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As the title suggests, is this test name just a little of the top?

WhenChargeIsGreaterThanRestingChargeButLessThanChargeRestApproachStep_OnUpdate_ChargeIsSetToRestingCharge

Any suggestions on how to improve this? or is it fine as it is?

Below is the whole test fixture as it stands so you can get some context :)

public class NeuronTests    
{
        [Fact]
        public void OnUpdate_NeuronFiresWhenChargeIsEqualToThreshold()
        {
            Neuron neuron = new Neuron();
            bool fired = false;
            neuron.Fired += (s, e) => fired = true;
            neuron.Charge = Neuron.ChargeThreshold;

            neuron.Update();

            Assert.True(fired, "Neuron didn't fire");
        }

        [Fact]
        public void OnUpdate_NeuronDoesntFireWhenChargeIsLessThanThreshold()
        {
            Neuron neuron = new Neuron();
            bool fired = false;
            neuron.Fired += (s, e) => fired = true;

            neuron.Charge = Neuron.ChargeThreshold - 1f;
            neuron.Update();

            Assert.False(fired, "Neuron fired!");
        }

        [Fact]
        public void OnUpdate_NeuronFiresWhenChargeIsGreaterThanThreshold()
        {
            Neuron neuron = new Neuron();
            bool fired = false;
            neuron.Fired += (s, e) => fired = true;
            neuron.Charge = Neuron.ChargeThreshold + 1f;

            neuron.Update();

            Assert.True(fired, "Neuron didn't fire");
        }

        [Fact]
        public void WhenNeuronFires_ChargeResetsToRestingCharge()
        {
            Neuron neuron = new Neuron();
            neuron.Charge = Neuron.ChargeThreshold;

            neuron.Update();

            Assert.Equal(Neuron.RestingCharge, neuron.Charge);
        }

        [Fact]
        public void AfterFiring_OnUpdate_NeuronWontFire()
        {
            Neuron neuron = new Neuron();
            int fireCount = 0;
            neuron.Fired += (s, e) => fireCount++;

            neuron.Charge = Neuron.ChargeThreshold;
            neuron.Update();
            neuron.Charge = Neuron.ChargeThreshold;
            neuron.Update();

            Assert.Equal(1, fireCount);
        }

        [Fact]
        public void WhenResting_OnUpdate_NeuronWillFire()
        {
            Neuron neuron = new Neuron();
            int fireCount = 0;
            neuron.Fired += (s, e) => fireCount++;

            neuron.Charge = Neuron.ChargeThreshold;
            neuron.Update();
            neuron.Charge = Neuron.ChargeThreshold;
            neuron.Update();
            neuron.Charge = Neuron.ChargeThreshold;
            neuron.Update();

            Assert.Equal(2, fireCount);
        }

        [Fact]
        public void WhenChargeIsGreaterThanRestingCharge_OnUpdate_ChargeDecreasesTowardsRestingCharge()
        {
            Neuron neuron = new Neuron();

            neuron.Charge = Neuron.RestingCharge + (2 * Neuron.ChargeRestApproachStep);

            neuron.Update();

            Assert.Equal(Neuron.RestingCharge + Neuron.ChargeRestApproachStep, neuron.Charge);
        }

        [Fact]
        public void WhenChargeIsGreaterThanRestingChargeButLessThanChargeRestApproachStep_OnUpdate_ChargeIsSetToRestingCharge()
        {
            Neuron neuron = new Neuron();

            neuron.Charge = Neuron.RestingCharge + (Neuron.ChargeRestApproachStep * 0.5f);

            neuron.Update();

            Assert.Equal(Neuron.RestingCharge, neuron.Charge);
        }


    }
share|improve this question
8  
That looks like a name I would come up with. That's an AWESOME name for a test case! It's crystal clear, even without a comment, AND you get to get a chuckle imagining the reaction of the first maintenance programmer looking at it and thinking "what the ???" If you can inject humor into your code without hurting readability or performance, so much the better. – David Nov 10 '10 at 12:55
1  
clear, concise, self documenting...what more can anyone want? – user448374 Nov 10 '10 at 12:57
    
Could be useful some day when you got a test runner that can execute a name. – Hans Passant Nov 10 '10 at 13:02
    
I think it's terribly terribly wrong, but I wouldn't know how to improve it either except for a manual that explain what "Method_One" means but nobody likes a GOTO. And ye Quick Fix Nueron to Neuron. – Proclyon Nov 10 '10 at 13:03
    
Too short to post as an answer: It'd be perfect if there's nothing left to remove. If that means it's a long name, so be it. Only reason not to use long names is to save the eyes of a reader and/or if someone has to type out more than three characters before the autosuggest kicks in. – fwielstra Nov 15 '10 at 1:21
up vote 15 down vote accepted

My personal opinion is that method names can never be too long, as long as they are descriptive.

Unit test names tend to be a lot longer, since they have to contain more information. This is fine for me too, since they only appear in the method signature and in your list of tests (and this is where you want to have a good name), you'll never call them from any other code.

share|improve this answer

One popular way to layout tests like these is to use nested classes with a Given/When/Then type vocabulary as suggested by typical BDD practices, e.g.

public class NeuronStory
{
    public class GivenChargeIsGreaterThanRestingCharge
    {
        public class GivenChargeIsLessThanChargeRestApproachStep
        {
            public class WhenUpdated
            {
                public void ThenChargeIsSetToRestingCharge()
                {
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

This way you can also nest other tests which also fit into the GivenChargeIsGreaterThanRestingCharge storyline in the same place.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent way to lay out your tests. – Daniel May Nov 10 '10 at 13:16
    
That's certainly an interesting way of laying the tests out. It's a bit too nested for my aesthetic taste though. – Sekhat Nov 10 '10 at 13:18
1  
this is a better way to represent the name, while the other was good start. – none Nov 10 '10 at 13:21
    
I like this, could you link to where those BDD practices are listed? (BDD? TDD?) – fwielstra Nov 15 '10 at 1:22

The underscores give clues to what you think should be moved out of the method name.

  • Move what is under test to the class name.
  • Move what the test result should be to the assert statement (comment if necessary). Why? If the assertion in the test ever changes, should the name of the test change?

Then you could have:

public class NeuronOnUpdateTests
{
  public void WhenChargeIsBetweenRestingChargeAndChargeRestApproachStep
  {
    //Charge is set to resting state
    Assert.True(x);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Coming back to reviewing old questions. I noticed this and I like it. I had subconsciously grouped them with the underscore. Glad someone spotted it :) – Sekhat Nov 22 '11 at 12:14

It is a bit long, maintainers want to read the function to get a quick idea what the function does, having something that long makes it quicker to read the function itself.

This applies to tests also. When I feel the need to write a essay as a function title, I strip out 'When' 'Is' and repeated words... leaving:

ChargeGreaterThanRestingButLessThanRestApproachStep_OnUpdate_ChargeSetToResting

Not much less descriptive, much more easily readable...

As The Windows Phone 7 Ads say 'More Glance and Go'

share|improve this answer

As an aside, one way (certainly not THE one way) of naming tests is to write your test name as an assertion.

A simple (naive) example:

int Add(object a, object b)
{
   return a+b;
}

[TestMethod]
void AddFailsWithNonIntegerArguments()
{
    try
    {
      Add("Hello", "World");
      Assert::Fail();
    }
    catch
    {
      Assert::Pass();
    }
}

On the main question I think long test function names are fine, as long as they're unambiguous

share|improve this answer

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