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I'm trying to build an application using some of ffmpeg's libraries and I'm noticing many data structures with the word "Context" in them.

You can see some here http://www.ffmpeg.org/doxygen/trunk/classes.html

I don't understand the use of the word "context" in this.. context.

Any hints as to what it generally means?

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1  
Translate to "state", maybe that helps. –  Hans Passant Nov 10 '10 at 12:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Looking at documentations you provided it seems related to the context of a particolar codec so that every SomethingContext encapsulates

  • the structs necessary for that particular codec (headers and so on)
  • the available operations when wortking with that codec (which may vary according to the complexity of the codec itself)

something like "when working with H264.."

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In C, a struct is usually the means by which instantiation of an object occurs.

An API will have a new() type function, which will allocate one of these 'context' structures and provide a pointer to it.

That pointer is then typically passed to any public functions from that API.

e.g.

struct btree_state
   *btree_state;

btree_new( &btree_state );
btree_new_element( btree_state, pointer_to_user_data );

This way we can have multiple instances of the given object. We select which one to use by the state pointer we pass into the API functions.

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For FFMpeg, think of "context" to be kind of like an object instance (c++, java "this"). A context is created when a format session is opened within FFmepg, when an input device is opened, a codec, and for an output device

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