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I want to create a model that doesn't map to a database table. Instead, stays in memory as a python object.

Actually, this model is supposed to represents normalised data from many other table-mapped models.

The other models store data which can be edited multiple times in a single day. Because of these multiple edits, I don't want a table-mapped-model that performs normalisations/calculations and stores them in a database as, this stored data can go out of date right away.

Every time this normalised model is accessed (via admin), I want it to perform the normalisations on data from the other models from scratch (So that it can show the most up to date data) and behave just like a normal model would under admin like Showing the list view and a detailed view for each row.

Edit after Shintoist's answer:

@Shintoist Thanks for the clearing things out and providing a usable approach. I have just implemented it but hitting a small wall in the end :)

@skirmantas: Yes, the calculations are in a separate object. This object is being passed into the custom views.

Problem: One problem is that under admin.py, I have created an modeladminclass for this object(which doesn't inherit models.Model) so my custom views can overide the changelist view and changeview. I then use admin.site.register() to register this model-like class and the modeladmin. But, since this model is not a django model at all (as it is an independant python object in memory) admin.site.register() throws a " 'type' object is not iterable" error. I don't want to use the url.py instead of admin.py as it's meant for the frontend while Im trying to overide the backend-admin.

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1  
I understand you wanting to use the admin, but for your needs it's a very round-about way of doing it. Couldn't you just override the admin template with a link somewhere on the page to the url that uses the view you wrote? That way it would be "in" the admin. Django will automatically look for templates that override the built ins. Otherwise I suggest you go with Tomasz Zielinski's solution. –  Erik Kronberg Nov 10 '10 at 18:53
    
@tomas. If I create the normalisation model to map to a table in memory, would'nt it still be static. I mean, the model when opened, fetches the latest data from other models, normalises/processes that data and shows a list. Now in the mean time, if someone edits the other models, these wouldn't show in the normalisation model until the server is restarted (which would reload the memory table). –  sysasa Nov 10 '10 at 20:31
    
I would also like to add, my django implementation already uses three databases, one that contains legacy data (so that I can migrate it to the new system), one SQLlite for running tests via fixtures and third, the main database. This would also mean, I will be adding a fourth database only for the sake of one model. –  sysasa Nov 10 '10 at 20:34
1  
Why would you even want to register some class which isn't django model with admin.site.register? Make your view and your own forms which do the stuff you need. –  skyjur Nov 10 '10 at 21:40

4 Answers 4

What about using multiple databases, and configuring one of them to use in-memory tables?

For MySQL it would look like this:

DATABASES = {
    'default': {
    },
    'memory': {
        'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.mysql',
        'NAME': 'dbname',
        'USER': 'dbuser',
        'PASSWORD': '',  
        'HOST': 'localhost',
        'PORT': '',         

        'OPTIONS': {"init_command": "SET storage_engine=MEMORY"}
    }
}

Note that you only need to use SET storage_engine when creating tables, but it might be that it doesn't add too much overhead anyway for your use case.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/memory-storage-engine.html

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you beat me to the punch. Although I would've done it in SQLite. –  JudoWill Nov 10 '10 at 15:51
    
@JudoWill: Right, SQLite is also a way to go. Personally I prefer to use the same DBMS for all work, just to stay on the safe side in case of some incompatibilities. This, however, mostly concerns unit testing. –  Tomasz Zielinski Nov 10 '10 at 16:39
    
If I create the normalisation model to map to a table in memory, would'nt it still be static. I mean, the model when opened, fetches the latest data from other models, normalises/processes that data and shows a list. Now in the mean time, if someone edits the other models, these wouldn't show in the normalisation model until the server is restarted (which would reload the memory table) –  sysasa Nov 11 '10 at 15:59

Why have a model at all? Reference your calculations in a view, write a template for it and require admin login to access it. That would recreate this normalised data only when you load the page and would only ever exist in memory, saving you resources.

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2  
Put your calculations in a view Thats the worst thing you could do. It will result unreadable and unmaintainable code. Views should be kept minimalist. Any calculations should be done somewhere else. Forms works well to parse request data. Calculations could be done within helpers. –  skyjur Nov 10 '10 at 17:24
1  
Clarified for you. –  Erik Kronberg Nov 10 '10 at 17:26
    
I have edited my question. Please see above –  sysasa Nov 10 '10 at 17:59

Depending on how complex these "calculations" are, it sounds like you want a custom database view (supported, I believe, by SQLite, MySQL, Postgres, and Oracle, at least) used in conjunction with a model with Meta.managed=False.

If you're lucky, you'll be able to get South to create it for you in a migration, but it doesn't look like South supports views yet.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

hmmm. Thanks for your help everyone. The solution I have come up (with your help ofcourse) is as follows:

I have two custom templates:

   my_model_list.html
   my_model_detail.html

Under views.py:

class MyModel(object):
    # ... Access other models
    # ... process / normalise data 
    # ... store data

@staff_member_required
def my_model_list_view(request) #show list of all objects
    #. . . create objects of MyModel . . .
    #. . . call their processing methods . . .
    #. . . store in context variable . . . 
    r = render_to_response('admin/myapp/my_model_list.html', context, RequestContext(request))
    return HttpResponse(r)

@staff_member_required
def my_model_detail_view(request, row_id) # Shows one row (all values in the object) in detail     
    #. . . create object of MyModel . . .
    #. . . call it's methods . . .
    #. . . store in context variable . . . 
    r = render_to_response('admin/myapp/my_model_detail.html', context, RequestContext(request))
    return HttpResponse(r)

Under the main django urls.py:

urlpatterns = patterns( 
    '',
    (r'^admin/myapp/mymodel/$', my_model_list_view),
    (r'^admin/myapp/mymodel/(\d+)/$', my_model_detail_view),
    ( r'^admin/', include( admin.site.urls ) )
)

As you've already noticed, I had to insert url patterns to my url.py file. I don't know if thats the best way to do it, as I reckon, the url.py file is not meant for admin related pages. It's only for the site frontend.

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