Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to include a .h file to my project which will be supplied at the runtime. Since .h files are linked at linking time i am unable to include .h file. So i decided to write a dummy program which would create .h file and then i would call my actual program. Is there anyway to do this. Or any other solution is possible. I basically need to create a .h file before my program starts execution and need to link it up to my program. i actually should take a file which is created by user, parse the file and then create a structure with the fields present in that file.for example if the file contains the following data:- fno:int:4,fname:char:30,ftype:int:4 then i should create a structure like struct somename { int fno; char fname[30]; int ftype }; Then i should be able to create instances of the structure created. This is what i like to do

share|improve this question
    
As Steve said - don't do this. :-) – Prof. Falken Nov 10 '10 at 14:23

dlopen is a solution. It allows to load dynamic library at runtime.

  • Compile your dummy program as a dynamic library.
  • Make use of dlopen on your .so
  • Call any function you need as if it has been linked by gcc (see dlsym).
share|improve this answer
4  
+1 but also: don't do this. Solve the real problem instead of this crazy problem that you've created for yourself in an attempt to solve the real problem ;-) – Steve Jessop Nov 10 '10 at 14:13
    
I agree with Steve. dlopen is basically for plugins (I still don't get if that's what you're doing by the way) – log0 Nov 10 '10 at 16:30

What you can do is:

  • create .h file
  • fork
    • if in child: execve
    • if in father: wait (or not, depends on what you want to do)
share|improve this answer

I would use a Makefile; your program would receive the header file at runtime, (perhaps check it?) then execve() the make command passing the name of the file.

However, this sounds very cumbersome; perhaps you are trying to achieve something with the wrong tool. Maybe you want to use some scripting first? Or write two separate programs..? What are you trying to do?

share|improve this answer
    
i actually should take a file which is created by user, parse the file and then create a structure with the fields present in that file.for example if the file contains the following data:- fno:int:4,fname:char:30,ftype:int:4 then i should create a structure like struct somename { int fno; char fname[30],int ftype }; Then i should be able to create instances of the structure created. This is what i like to do – nikhil Nov 10 '10 at 19:52
    
@nikhil: consider using python and executing C code from within it if you're concerned about performances. Your approach is quite difficult, since you're basically trying to write a parser to check for the syntax and to allocate memory.. good luck avoiding errors there. – lorenzog Nov 10 '10 at 21:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.