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I'm doing my first steps with OpenGL in processing.org. I'd like to draw two crossed triangles, but don't really get how to rotate the triangles to cross them.

PGraphicsOpenGL pgl = (PGraphicsOpenGL) g;
GL gl = pgl.beginGL();

gl.glTranslatef(width/2, height/2, 0);
gl.glRotatef(a, 0, 0, 0);

gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES);
gl.glColor4f(0.7, 0.1, 0.7, 0.8);
gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 0);
gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0);
gl.glVertex3f(25, 0, 25);
gl.glEnd();

gl.glRotatef(90, 1, 0, 0);
gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES);
gl.glColor4f(0.1, 0.9, 0.7, 0.8);
gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 0);
gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0);
gl.glVertex3f(25, 0, 25);
gl.glEnd();

pgl.endGL();

The triangles should be crossed like these old 3D models of trees. They should rotate and move as one object in later use, which I figured works with pop and push around both vertices, I just can't figure out the rotation to get these two triangles together.

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3 Answers 3

If I understand you correctly you are trying to rotate the triangles independently of eachother? In that case you would need to use gl.PushMatrix() before the triangle and gl.PopMatrix(); after the triangle. Ex:

gl.PushMatrix();
{
  gl.glTranslatef(width/2, height/2, 0); 
  gl.glRotatef(a, 0, 0, 0); 

  gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES); 
  gl.glColor4f(0.7, 0.1, 0.7, 0.8); 
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 0); 
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0); 
  gl.glVertex3f(25, 0, 25); 
  gl.glEnd(); 
}
gl.PopMatrix();

gl.PushMatrix();
{
  gl.glRotatef(90, 1, 0, 0); 
  gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES); 
  gl.glColor4f(0.1, 0.9, 0.7, 0.8); 
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 0); 
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0); 
  gl.glVertex3f(25, 0, 25); 
  gl.glEnd(); 
}
gl.PopMatrix();

other wise the top rotation will be applied to both triangles.

Also, I noticed you said you need two crossed "rectangles". If that is the case you will need 4 triangles or one quad for each. So one Quad, rectangle, would be:

gl.PushMatrix();
{

  gl.glTranslatef(width/2, height/2, 0);       
  gl.glRotatef(a, 0, 0, 0);       

  gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES);       
  gl.glColor4f(0.7, 0.1, 0.7, 0.8);       
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 0);       
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0);       
  gl.glVertex3f(25, 0, 25);
  gl.glVertex3f(25, 0, 25);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0);
  gl.glVertex3f(25, 50, 25);     
  gl.glEnd();

}
gl.PopMatrix();

or even better

gl.PushMatrix();
{    
  gl.glTranslatef(width/2, height/2, 0);       
  gl.glRotatef(a, 0, 0, 0);       

  gl.glBegin(GL.GL_QUADS);
  gl.glColor4f(0.7, 0.1, 0.7, 0.8);       
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 0);       
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0); 
  gl.glVertex3f(25, 50, 25);      
  gl.glVertex3f(25, 0, 25);         
  gl.glEnd();      
}
gl.PopMatrix();

Hope this helps.

Ahh, now we are getting somewhere! Ok this is way simple. As far as the rotation goes you can avoid that and go directly to drawing the quads on top of each other. Going based on your original values of 25 and 50 here is an Example with triangles:

gl.PushMatrix();
{
  gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES);       
  gl.glColor4f(0.7, 0.1, 0.7, 0.8);  

  gl.glVertex3f(-12.5, -25, -12.5);       
  gl.glVertex3f(-12.5, 25, -12.5);       
  gl.glVertex3f(12.5, -25, -12.5);
  gl.glVertex3f(12.5, -25, -12.5);
  gl.glVertex3f(-12.5, 25, -12.5);
  gl.glVertex3f(12.5, 25, -12.5); 

  gl.glVertex3f(0, -25, 0);       
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 25, 0);       
  gl.glVertex3f(0, -25, -25);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, -25, -25);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 25, 0);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 25, -25); 

  gl.glEnd();

}
gl.PopMatrix();

Example with Quads:

gl.PushMatrix();
{
  gl.glBegin(GL.GL_QUADS);
  gl.glColor4f(0.7, 0.1, 0.7, 0.8); 

  gl.glVertex3f(-12.5, -25, -12.5);       
  gl.glVertex3f(-12.5, 25, -12.5);  
  gl.glVertex3f(12.5, 25, -12.5);      
  gl.glVertex3f(12.5, -25, -12.5);


  gl.glVertex3f(0, -25, 0);       
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 25, 0);   
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 25, -25);      
  gl.glVertex3f(0, -25, -25);
  gl.glEnd();     
}
gl.PopMatrix();

If this is just for an example then this code should be fine. However, if your going to be rendering multiples of these then you are going to want to store the quad render code into a vertex buffer object and then render multiple of the vertex buffer objects.

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I will try to be more clear: I just need two triangles, which should be crossed in the middle (like these old 3d models of trees, it's hard to explain). They should rotate together, which I got so far, but not the crossed triangles themselves. –  Patrick Nov 10 '10 at 17:06
    
Well I have two solutions for you for the tree. What I need to know is if you mean the trees they used to use in games where the leaves where just two crossed quads with a texture on them or if you mean a pyramid shaped top for the leaves. Otherwise I'm not sure what you mean by two crossed trianges. Maybe you could mock something simple up in paint real quick. I promise I won't grade you on your programmer art. –  lrussell851 Nov 10 '10 at 17:45
    
I mean the trees from the games, where two textured quads where crossed. If seen from the button, it should look like a +, and from the the sides just like a triangle. Can draw something tomorrow, but I guess with the + it's getting clear? Next time I'll draw directly. –  Patrick Nov 10 '10 at 18:08

I'll try to answer your question in several parts.

1) This code will draw a single rectangle, but you mention 2 rectangle and 2 triangles and it's fairly confusing what you are trying to do.

2) "Both rectangles should act as one object later". This really isn't possible via OpenGL. In opengl (at least at beginner levels), entire objects are created by chaining together single commands. So you don't say "here is an object, now draw it here, here and here". Instead you say "draw this triangle, now draw this rectangle, now rotate, now draw this triangel". It's a step-by-step process.

OpenGL knows nothing about objects or models, it's up to you to define that in your code, then tell OpenGL how to draw each object.

One of the best sources for learning OpenGL is the NeHe tutorials found here http://nehe.gamedev.net/ They should have java versions of the tutorials, otherwise not hard to understand.

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Tried to reformulate the question above. Thanks for the link! –  Patrick Nov 10 '10 at 17:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to your code and some geometry on paper, I finally found the solution(s) for my problem:

Crossed-triangle solution:

gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES);
  gl.glColor4f(0.1, 0.9, 0.7, 0.8);
  gl.glVertex3f(-25, 0, 0);    // lower left vertex
  gl.glVertex3f( 25, 0, 0);    // lower right vertex
  gl.glVertex3f( 0,  50, 0);    // upper vertex
gl.glEnd();

gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES);
  gl.glColor4f(0.9, 0.1, 0.7, 0.8);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 25);    // lower left vertex
  gl.glVertex3f( 0, 0, -25);    // lower right vertex
  gl.glVertex3f( 0,  50, 0);    // upper vertex
gl.glEnd();

Or the same with four triangles:

gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES);
  gl.glColor4f(0.7, 0.1, 0.7, 0.8);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 0);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0);
  gl.glVertex3f(25, 0, 25);
gl.glEnd();

gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES);
  gl.glColor4f(0.1, 0.9, 0.7, 0.8);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 0);
  gl.glVertex3f(-25, 0, -25);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0);
gl.glEnd();

gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES);
  gl.glColor4f(0.1, 0.1, 0.9, 0.8);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 0);
  gl.glVertex3f(25, 0, -25);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0);
gl.glEnd();

gl.glBegin(GL.GL_TRIANGLES);
  gl.glColor4f(0.1, 0.9, 0.7, 0.8);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 0, 0);
  gl.glVertex3f(-25, 0, 25);
  gl.glVertex3f(0, 50, 0);
gl.glEnd();
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