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The event logs for my .NET application show that it occasionally deadlocks while reading from Sql Server. This is usually very rare as we have already optimized our queries to avoid deadlocks, but they sometimes still occur. In the past, we've had some deadlocks that occur while calling the ExecuteReader function on our SqlCommand instance. To fix this we've added retry code to simply run the query again, like this:

//try to run the query five times if a deadlock happends
int DeadLockRetry = 5;

while (DeadLockRetry > 0)
{
    try
    {
        return dbCommand.ExecuteReader();
    }
    catch (SqlException err)
    {
        //throw an exception if the error is not a deadlock or the deadlock still exists after 5 tries
        if (err.Number != 1205 || --DeadLockRetry == 0)
            throw;
    }
}

This worked very well for the case where the deadlock happened during the initial query execute, but now we are getting deadlocks while iterating through the results using the Read() function on the returned SqlDataReader.

Again, I'm not concerned about optimizing the query, but merely trying to recover in the rare case that a deadlock occurs. I was thinking about using a similar retry process. I could create my own class that inherits from SqlDataReader which simply overrides the Read function with retry code. Like this:

public class MyDataReader : SqlDataReader
{
    public override bool Read()
    {
        int DeadLockRetry = 5;
        while (DeadLockRetry > 0)
        {
            try
            {
                return base.Read();
            }
            catch (SqlException ex)
            {
                if (ex.ErrorCode != 1205 || --DeadLockRetry == 0)
                    throw;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
}

Is this the right approach? I want to be sure that records aren't skipped in the reader. Will retrying Read after a deadlock skip any rows? Also, should I call Thread.Sleep between retries to give the database time to get out of the deadlock state, or is this enough. This case is not easy to reproduce so I'd like to be sure about it before I modify any of my code.

EDIT:

As requested, some more info about my situation: In one case, I have a process that performs a query that loads a list of record ids that need to be updated. Then I iterate through that list of ids using the Read function and run an update process on that record, which will eventually update a value for that record in the database. (No, there is no way to perform the update in the initial query, many other things occur for each record that is returned). This code has been working fine for a while, but we are running quite a bit of code for each record, so I can imagine one of those processes is creating a lock on the initial table being read through.

After some thought, Scottie's suggestion to use a data structure to store the results would likely fix this situation. I could store the ids returned in a List<int> and loop through that. That way the locks on the rows can be removed right away.

However, I would still be interested in knowing if there is a general way to recover from deadlocks on a read.

share|improve this question
    
Could you give more info on your DB use ? It is strange to get a deadlock while reading data. It means that your code is already holding some locks for other data and another transaction has locked what you are trying to read and is waiting for the data that you have previously accessed. Can you call ExecuteReader on another transaction ? –  Timores Nov 10 '10 at 16:00
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your entire transaction is lost in a deadlock. You have to restart from scratch, from way above the level where you read a data reader. You say that you read some records, then update them in a loop. You have to restart with reading again the records:

function DoWork() {
  using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope(...)) {
    cmd = new SqlCommand("select ...");
    using (DataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader ()) {
        while(rdr.Read()) {
          ... process each record
        }
    }
    scope.Complete ();
  }
}

you have to retry the entire DoWork call:

retries = 0;
success = false;
do {
 try {
  DoWork ();
  success = true;
 }
 catch (SqlException e) {
   if (can retry e)  {
     ++retries;
   }
   else {
     throw;
   }
 }
} while (!success);
share|improve this answer
    
This. You can't just try to reread, you need to rerun the command. But you should definitely limit number of retries to 3-5 max, it takes SQL server some time to handle deadlocks. –  Pavel Urbančík Nov 11 '10 at 8:58
    
Ok thanks, this is what I was looking for. We have an abstracted data layer that returns IDataReaders for all our read queries, and then our logic code uses the readers. So in my application coding my reads as you suggested is not easy. I was hoping for a general solution, but it looks like this is not possible. I will consider using this suggestion for the specific cases that are causing occasional deadlocks. Thanks all for you suggestions! –  InvisibleBacon Nov 11 '10 at 16:51
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Could you possibly consider using DataSets or DataTables instead of DataReaders?

My fear here, although I'm not positive, is that the read throwing the error will discard that record altogether. You might want to test this in a controlled environment where you can force an error and see if it re-reads the record or if it just discards it.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm fairly sure that using a DataTable or set would have the same vulnerabilities. Wouldn't .NET use Read internally to fill the DataTable? I would definitely like to be able to test this in a controlled environment. Not sure exactly what causes the deadlocks though, so this would be difficult. –  InvisibleBacon Nov 10 '10 at 15:54
    
You don't have to test for deadlock specifically. If you are in a controlled environment, you could take the SQL server down for a second and trap THAT error. That would at least tell you if the record is re-read or discarded. –  Scottie Nov 10 '10 at 15:59
    
Yes, DataSets use the same read mechanisms, but I wonder if MS has deadlock code already in place when reading? –  Scottie Nov 10 '10 at 15:59
    
As I noted in my edit, the idea of storing my results in a data structure and reading all at once might work in one case (it's just returning a list of ids). What MS functions are you referring to that might have deadlock handling built in? –  InvisibleBacon Nov 10 '10 at 16:32
    
Using DataAdapters to Fill the DataSet. I can't say for sure that they have deadlock support built in, but it might be worth checking into. –  Scottie Nov 10 '10 at 16:47
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