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I have a situation where it seems like I need to add instance variables to a category, but I know from Apple's docs that I can't do that. So I'm wondering what the best alternative or workaround is.

What I want to do is add a category that adds functionality to UIViewControllers. I would find it useful in all my different UIViewControllers, no matter what specific UIViewController subclass they extend, so I think a category is the best solution. To implement this functionality, I need several different methods, and I need to track data in between them, so that's what led me to wanting to create instance methods.

In case it's helpful, here's what I specifically want to do. I want to make it easier to track when the software keyboard hides and shows, so that I can resize content in my view. I've found that the only way to do it reliably is to put code in four different UIViewController methods, and track extra data in instance variables. So those methods and instance variables are what I'd like to put into a category, so I don't have to copy-paste them each time I need to handle the software keyboard. (If there's a simpler solution for this exact problem, that's fine too--but I would still like to know the answer to category instance variables for future reference!)

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4  
Can you make a subclass? –  KennyTM Nov 10 '10 at 15:46
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6 Answers

Yes you can do this, but since you're asking, I have to ask: Are you absolutely sure that you need to? (If you say "yes", then go back, figure out what you want to do, and see if there's a different way to do it)

However, if you really want to inject storage into a class you don't control, use an associative reference.

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I didn't know about associative references, nice tip! –  Felipe Sabino Jun 21 '11 at 18:56
3  
New associative reference link: developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/… –  lilbyrdie Jun 24 '11 at 17:55
    
@lilbyrdie thanks i fixed the link :) –  Dave DeLong Jun 24 '11 at 18:00
1  
Thank you! There's a lot in the Apple docs that I haven't seen yet (not even just a little). Apple should improve the structure of their docs. –  Randy Marsh Jan 11 '12 at 21:17
1  
Though it seems that associative reference documentation could not be found anymore! I had used a sample code that i have found on: davidhamrick.com/2012/02/12/… –  LolaRun Jan 31 '13 at 18:15
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Recently, I needed to do this (add state to a Category). @Dave DeLong has the correct perspective on this. In researching the best approach, I found a great blog post by Tom Harrington. I like @JeremyP's idea of using @property declarations on the Category, but not his particular implementation (not a fan of the global singleton or holding global references). Associative References are the way to go.

Here's code to add (what appear to be) ivars to your Category. I've blogged about this in detail here.

In File.h, the caller only sees the clean, high-level abstraction:

@interface UIViewController (MyCategory)
@property (retain,nonatomic) NSUInteger someObject;
@end

In File.m, we can implement the @property (NOTE: These cannot be @synthesize'd):

@implementation UIViewController (MyCategory)

- (NSUInteger)someObject
{
  return [MyCategoryIVars fetch:self].someObject;
}

- (void)setSomeObject:(NSUInteger)obj
{
  [MyCategoryIVars fetch:self].someObject = obj;
}

We also need to declare and define the class MyCategoryIVars. For ease of understanding, I've explained this out of proper compilation order. The @interface needs to be placed before the Category @implementation.

@interface MyCategoryIVars : NSObject
@property (retain,nonatomic) NSUInteger someObject;
+ (MyCategoryIVars*)fetch:(id)targetInstance;
@end

@implementation MyCategoryIVars

@synthesize someObject;

+ (MyCategoryIVars*)fetch:(id)targetInstance
{
  static void *compactFetchIVarKey = &compactFetchIVarKey;
  MyCategoryIVars *ivars = objc_getAssociatedObject(targetInstance, &compactFetchIVarKey);
  if (ivars == nil) {
    ivars = [[MyCategoryIVars alloc] init];
    objc_setAssociatedObject(targetInstance, &compactFetchIVarKey, ivars, OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC);
    [ivars release];
  } 
  return ivars;
}

- (id)init
{
  self = [super init];
  return self;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
  self.someObject = nil;
  [super dealloc];
}

@end

The above code declares and implements the class which holds our ivars (someObject). As we cannot really extend UIViewController, this will have to do.

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I believe it is now possible to add synthesized properties to a category and the instance variables are automagically created, but I've never tried it so I'm not sure if it will work.

A more hacky solution:

Create a singleton NSDictionary which will have the UIViewController as the key (or rather its address wrapped as an NSValue) and the value of your property as its value.

Create getter and setter for the property that actually goes to the dictionary to get/set the property.

@interface UIViewController(MyProperty)

@property (nonatomic, retain) id myProperty;
@property (nonatomic, readonly, retain) NSMutableDcitionary* propertyDictionary;

@end

@implementation  UIViewController(MyProperty)

-(NSMutableDictionary*) propertyDictionary
{
    static NSMutableDictionary* theDictionary = nil;
    if (theDictionary == nil)
    {
        theDictioanry = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
    }
    return theDictionary;
}


-(id) myProperty
{
    NSValue* key = [NSValue valueWithPointer: self];
    return [[self propertyDictionary] objectForKey: key];
}

-(void) setMyProperty: (id) newValue
{
    NSValue* key = [NSValue valueWithPointer: self];
    [[self propertyDictionary] setObject: newValue forKey: key];    
}

@end

Two potential problems with the above approach:

  • there's no way to remove keys of view controllers that have been deallocated. As long as you are only tracking a handful, that shouldn't be a problem. Or you could add a method to delete a key from the dictionary once you know you are done with it.
  • I'm not 100% certain that the isEqual: method of NSValue compares content (i.e. the wrapped pointer) to determine equality or if it just compares self to see if the comparison object is the exact same NSValue. If the latter, you'll have to use NSNumber instead of NSValue for the keys (NSNumber numberWithUnsignedLong: will do the trick on both 32 bit and 64 bit platforms).
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2  
.... or you can just use an associated reference –  Dave DeLong Nov 10 '10 at 17:28
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I believe it is possible to add variables to a class using the Obj-C runtime.
I found this discussion also.

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Did this make it into iOS? I haven't kept up with that new feature (it seems so dirty to me :-)). –  Joshua Nozzi Nov 10 '10 at 16:05
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Why not simply create a subclass of UIViewController, add the functionality to that, then use that class (or a subclass thereof) instead?

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5  
UITableViewController is a subclass of UIViewController. A category will add functionality to both, whereas a subclass won't. –  Stephen Furlani Nov 10 '10 at 15:50
1  
I suspect the OP has encountered UIViewController subclasses that they don't control. –  Justin Nov 10 '10 at 15:51
    
I see your point. Something about the wording made me think these were purely the OP's own direct UIViewController subclasses. I suspect KennyTM (based on his comment) read it the same way. :-) –  Joshua Nozzi Nov 10 '10 at 16:01
1  
Correct, I want to extend both UIViewController and UITableViewController subclasses. –  Josh Justice Nov 10 '10 at 18:11
    
+1 for Stephen. It's a great comment. Yes a category will add functionality to both. –  Jim Thio Jan 31 '12 at 4:44
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Depending on what you're doing, you may want to use Static Category Methods.

So, I assume you've got this kind of problem:

ScrollView has a couple of textedits in them. User types on text edit, you want to scroll the scroll view so the text edit is visible above the keyboard.

+ (void) staticScrollView: (ScrollView*)sv scrollsTo:(id)someView
{
  // scroll view to someviews's position or some such.
}

returning from this wouldn't necessarily require the view to move back, and so it doesn't need to store anything.

But that's all I can thinkof without code examples, sorry.

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