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I'm studying UNIX programming and was experimenting with read/write system calls. I have a file with a pair of integer:

4 5

and I wrote this code to read the numbers:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

typedef struct prova {
    int first;
    int second;
} prova_t;

int main(void) {
    int fd;
prova_t origin;
prova_t result;
ssize_t bytes_read;
size_t nbytes;

fd = open("file.bin", O_WRONLY | O_CREAT);
origin.first = 24;
origin.second = 3;
write(fd, &origin, sizeof(prova_t));
close(fd);


fd = open("file.bin", O_RDONLY);
nbytes = sizeof(prova_t);
/* 1.BAD */
bytes_read = read(fd, &result, nbytes);
write(STDOUT_FILENO, &(result.first), sizeof(int));
write(STDOUT_FILENO, &(result.second), sizeof(int));
close(fd);

    /* 2.GOOD */
    nbytes = sizeof(int);
    bytes_read = read(fd, &(result.first), nbytes);
    write(STDOUT_FILENO, &(result.first), bytes_read);
    bytes_read = read(fd, &(result.second), nbytes);
    write(STDOUT_FILENO, &(result.second), bytes_read);

    return 0;
}

In my first attempt I tried to read the whole struct from file and write its members to stdout. In this way, along with the numbers, I get some weird characters

4 5
E�^�

In my second attempt I read the numbers one by one and there were no problems in the output.

Is there any way to read and write the struct using the first method?

Edit: I updated the code to reflect suggestion from other users but still getting strange characters instead of numbers

share|improve this question
    
DeadMG is right, but I am wondering if there might not be another aspect: does your input file contain the text "4 5", or is it a binary file holding the numbers 4 and 5 in binary form? –  Lars Nov 10 '10 at 17:18
    
Reading other suggestions I tried writing the struct on file using write and reading it back, but the problem persist. I updated my code –  JustB Nov 10 '10 at 17:46
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, let's do a hex dump to see what is really stored in the file.

hexdump -C b.txt or od -t x2 -t c b.txt are two examples (od is for octal dump, more common, less pretty output in my opinion)

00000000  34 20 35 0a                                       |4 5.|
00000004

That's is what the file looks like if it was a created as an ASCII text file (such as using a text editor like vi). You can use man ascii to double check the hexadecimal values.

Now if you had a binary file that only contains two 8-bit bytes, in the system's native byte ordering (e.g. little-endian for x86, big endian for MIPS, PA-RISC, 680x0) then the hexdump would look like:

00000000  04  05                                            |..|
00000004

Here is the code to both create (open & write) a binary file, and read it back.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdint.h>     /* uint32_t */
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>

/* User has read & write perms, group and others have read permission */ 
const mode_t mode = S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR | S_IRGRP | S_IROTH;

typedef struct prova {
   uint32_t first;
   uint32_t second;
} prova_t;

#define FILENAME "file.b"

/* 'Safe' write */
int safewrite( int fd, const void *p, size_t want) {
   int ret;

   errno = 0;
   while (want) {
      ret = write(fd, (uint8_t *)p, want);
      if (ret <= 0) {
         if (errno != EINTR && errno != EAGAIN) {
            return -1;
         }
         errno = 0;
         continue;
      }
      want -= ret;
      p = (uint8_t*) p + ret;
   }
   return 0;
}

int saferead(int fd, const void *p, size_t want) {
   int ret;

   errno = 0;
   while (want) {
      ret = read(fd, (uint8_t*)p, want);
      if( ret == 0 )
         return -1;  /* EOF */
      if (ret <= 0) {
         if( errno != EINTR && errno != EAGAIN ) {
            return -1;
         }
         errno = 0;
         continue;
      }
      want -= ret;
      p = (uint8_t*) p + ret;
   }
   return 0;
}


int main(int argc, char **argv) {
   int fd;
   prova_t result;
   size_t nbytes;

   /* Create file */
   fd = creat(FILENAME, mode);
   if (fd < 0) {
      fprintf(stderr, "Unable to open " FILENAME ": %s\n",
            strerror(errno));
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
   }
   nbytes = sizeof(prova_t);

   result.first = 4;
   result.second = 5;

   if (0 != safewrite(fd, &result, nbytes)) {
      fprintf(stderr, "Unable to write to " FILENAME ": %s\n",
            strerror(errno));
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
   }

   close(fd);
   fd = -1;

   /* Reopen and read from binary file */
   fd = open(FILENAME, O_RDONLY);
   nbytes = sizeof(prova_t);

   if (0 != saferead(fd, &result, nbytes)) {
      fprintf(stderr, "Unable to read file \"" FILENAME "\": %s\n",
            strerror(errno));
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
   }
   close(fd);

   printf( "Read: %d %d (%#.02x%.02x)\n",
         result.first, result.second,
         result.first, result.second);

   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Now the data file contents look like:

00000000  04 00 00 00 05 00 00 00                           |........|
00000008

Because the integers were specified as 32-bit integers (32-bits / 8 bits per byte = 4 bytes). I'm using a 64-bit system (little endian, x86), so I wanted to be explicit so the your results should match, assuming little-endian.

share|improve this answer
1  
I should note the very important detail, for when dealing with binary files in read life, is that you cannot rely on structures to be written as you want when dumping them to disk. In C, the compiler has the right to silently pad a structure to align structure members so as to be accessible on memory boundaries. Ref: c-faq.com/struct/align.html and Michael Crawford's goingware.com/tips/getting-started/alignment.html –  mctylr Nov 10 '10 at 18:09
    
+1 for actually doing the right thing, i.e. checking the number of bytes actually read or written. –  ninjalj Nov 10 '10 at 20:11
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You tried to read to a struct containing two ints, by passing a pointer to some data and telling read that you had one int's worth of storage. The first should be

bytes_read = read(fd, &result, sizeof(prova_t));
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you: it was a typo in the cut&paste. It's correct now, but the output is always corrupted –  JustB Nov 10 '10 at 17:06
add comment

You need to write the integers to the file as a prova_t in the first place using write. If you wrote them as 2 integers, you won't get them back as a prova_t because of struct padding.

share|improve this answer
add comment

From the name of your file, I assume that you are trying to read a text file. read from unistd.h reads from binary files. If you are indeed trying to read from a text file, you should use fscanf or in ifstream

To read a struct in binary:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

typedef struct prova {
    int first;
    int second;
} prova_t;

int main(void) {
    int fd;
    prova_t result;
    ssize_t bytes_read;
    size_t nbytes;
    prova_t initial;

    // create a binary file
    fd = open("file.bin", O_WRONLY | O_CREAT);
    initial.first = 4;
    initial.second = 5;
    write(fd, &initial, sizeof(prova_t));
    close(fp);

    // read it back
    fd = open("file.bin", O_RDONLY);
    nbytes = sizeof(prova_t);
    bytes_read = read(fd, &result, nbytes);
    write(STDOUT_FILENO, &(result.first), sizeof(int));
    write(STDOUT_FILENO, &(result.second), sizeof(int));
    close(fp);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I know there are other ways: I was asking if it's possible to read and then print on stdout a struct using only write/read system calls. –  JustB Nov 10 '10 at 17:10
    
@JustB it is possible. See my updated answer. –  Rod Nov 10 '10 at 17:26
    
Uhm, it makes sense, but it doesn't function. It print only weird characters :( –  JustB Nov 10 '10 at 17:37
1  
That is because the binary numbers are written directly to stdout, instead of translating them into text. For example, to see the character '4' appear using write(), you would have to write its numeric value 36. –  Lars Nov 10 '10 at 17:59
1  
@Lars: I'd upvote your comment, but ASCII for '4' is 0x34 = 52 –  ninjalj Nov 10 '10 at 20:07
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