Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anyone recommend a good IDE for general C coding and kernel development under Linux?

A few conditions would be:

  1. NOT ECLIPSE - or any other heavy-weight Java based monstrosity that has esoteric compatibility issues, and runs like a pig.

  2. Must work and play nice with Cygwin - or other ways of running it remotely (through X, or - I'm open to alternatives).

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by artless noise, peko, Steve Czetty, greg-449, salva Jan 30 '14 at 17:06

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking us to recommend or find a tool, library or favorite off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." – artless noise, peko, Steve Czetty, greg-449, salva
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I have never seen any kernel-related IDE, but it seems that Emacs and Vim are quite popular among kernel hackers. –  William Briand Nov 10 '10 at 17:04
    
"Questions asking us to recommend or find a tool, library or favorite off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." Reference: What topics can I ask about here? –  Sly Raskal Jan 29 '14 at 22:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

KDevelop is a wonderful IDE and it actually supports some Kernel-type of projects such as writing device drivers, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Will definitely check out! Thanks! –  Brad Nov 10 '10 at 18:14

Isn't vim + ctags + gdb enough?

share|improve this answer
    
That has been my mainstay for many, many years now - Just seeing what else may be out there for a more integrated and graphical environment. You forgot cscope, too ;-) –  Brad Nov 10 '10 at 17:01
3  
Nay! Nay! Listen not to the 6m heretics! Follow the true faith! Use emacs! –  dmckee Nov 10 '10 at 17:19
1  
[[ Flag last comment as inappropriate, spam, and/or porn ;-) ]]] –  Brad Nov 10 '10 at 18:08

In short no.

I used pida for a while, which was cool, but a bit buggy. Looks like they've had another release since then so might be worth a try. It's python focused but perfectly usable for other things. http://pida.co.uk

I use gvim, with the git plugin http://github.com/motemen/git-vim

And just make tags, gitk, gitg, git grep.

share|improve this answer

Code::Blocks I use it for both app dev and kernel dev.
Now I was scared by Eclipse as well and for the same reasons.
But it ended up being the only IDE I found so far that is able to handle the set of Linux kernel symbols for the WHOLE kernel source tree (functions, defines, structures, everything). It is able to parse the whole kernel sources in a decent time, some tens of minutes (one time operation for each kernel tree). So I at least use it as a very smart symbol browser.
What does this bring you? Full instant code navigation:
When studying kernel and developing kernel modules, this happens to be a HUGE time saver: To follow a function call, move the mouse cursor to the (called) function name, press Ctrl, click on the symbol, bingo, it loads the source module and instantly gets you to the function source code. Press the back arrow, you're back at the call place.
You can follow whole call chains / stacks / programming trees this way, and just naturally following code paths. Link from a var usage to a var definition, then follow up to the struct definitions and back...
And finally, I found that Eclipse was actually perfectly integrated in Linux:
It runs just like a native app and is not sluggish like I expected it to be. I didn't feel its large size. Now to get it working and achieve that, I had to install the latest / greatest Sun Java and make that the default java machine -- the open source Java package didn't cut it.

Just my 10c...

share|improve this answer

Well, NetBeans is a java monstrosity, but it's bearable, even on my netbook. I like the vi/vim plugin, and the undockable windows so that you can have a nice big editor window with the other stuff off in a separate window. Yes, it does a lot more than just Java, even C.

screenshots on my site

share|improve this answer

vim + gedit + acme, combination.

vim is good for console environment.

gedit with plugins is good for multiple files open.

acme just another way to open multiple files.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.