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I have a query that performs quite nicely when run like this:

SELECT YADAYADA FROM MYTABLE WHERE FVAL <= 100 AND TVAL >= 100

Since there's an index for (FVAL,TVAL), the query is totally optimal as a nonclustered index seek for the whole query.

Now, it'd be nice to use a constant returned from a user defined function here. The function will return a constant value for the entire transaction, not just this query. But doing this:

SELECT YADAYADA FROM MYTABLE WHERE FVAL <= dbo.myVal() AND TVAL >= dbo.myVal()

Yields suboptimal results - the query plan no longer nicely runs as an index seek, but instead insists on seeking and then filtering, which is obviously MUCH slower - even though in this instance my function is defined as returning a constant value in this really simple case.

I've tried using a BETWEEN clause - no better. I've tried table-valued functions, no better (in fact, the query plan gets rapidly more complex).

Is there any way of persuading SQL*Server that 'hey buddy, this is a constant value we're getting here, and to optimize the plan accordingly??

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2 Answers 2

The best that you could do would be to declare a variable within the query, assign the value of the UDF to that variable, then use the variable in the query.

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I could do that - but ultimately this SQL is also hidden within a view (hence the need to use a UDF in the first place, it's actually being pulled from context_info).. and I can't put a DECLARE in a view. I could put the whole thing in a user TDF or stored proc - which would then hide all the other columns from the query optimizer :-( –  user340535 Nov 10 '10 at 18:04
    
Unfortunately, it doesn't look like you can get what you want. It sounds like you're going to have to perform whatever lookups the UDF would perform as joins in the view instead. –  Adam Robinson Nov 10 '10 at 19:33

SQL Server is trying to be clever and suggests what will be the values for the query, but sometimes developer knows better.

The following concept should help you

DECLARE @fval INT
DECLARE @tval INT
SET @fval = dbo.myVal()
SET @tval = dbo.myVal()

SELECT YADAYADA FROM MYTABLE WHERE FVAL <= @fval AND TVAL >= @tval
OPTION (OPTIMIZE FOR(@fval= 100, @tval = 100))
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