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I want to do something like this:

var w = window.open("javascript: makeAnAjaxRequest();");

My question is, would the Ajax request (executed once the new window opens) be considered a cross-site request? Does the same-domain policy apply to the original domain whose page created the window?

In resposne to some of your comments:

someAjaxFunction() just has to make an Ajax request and be able to operate on the result. I understand that the function has to be defined in the window I am opening. No problem; I have a minified ajax function that I am using which I can inject into the URL as well. The point is to see what the limitations are of the request; i.e., under which domain will the same-domain policy be applied to?

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Good question! However, you are aware that you'll have to import quite a lot in order to run someAjaxFunction(), as you won't have the opening window's libraries available? Anyway, my bet is that the location of the script for the purposes of same-origin checking is undefined. –  Pekka 웃 Nov 10 '10 at 18:24
    
What does this even mean? Do you want the AJAX call to fetch the URL for the new window? Or is the AJAX call supposed to retrieve the new window contents? If the latter, it doesn't really make much sense unless what you're doing is a POST. –  Pointy Nov 10 '10 at 18:27
    
Also note that there's really no such thing as a "javascript:" URL. –  Pointy Nov 10 '10 at 18:27
    
Why do you want to do this? I can't think of why you would call window.open passing it a javascript: url... –  Juan Mendes Nov 10 '10 at 19:48
1  
I "understand" how that works; what's (somewhat) surprising is that the browser pays attention to that in a window.open() call. I guess it does it in any situation akin to an update to the URL bar, which is what an <a> tag effectively does, or obviously an explicit link (bookmarklet). I can't figure out any way to get window.open() to actually use any return value from the executed Javascript, or for anything to happen other than the creation of an empty new window (or tab). –  Pointy Nov 10 '10 at 21:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Some info from google: http://code.google.com/p/browsersec/wiki/Part2#Same-origin_policy_for_DOM_access

With no additional qualifiers, the term "same-origin policy" most commonly refers to a mechanism that governs the ability for JavaScript and other scripting languages to access DOM properties and methods across domains (reference). In essence, the model boils down to this three-step decision process:

If protocol, host name, and - for browsers other than Microsoft Internet Explorer - port number for two interacting pages match, access is granted with no further checks. Any page may set document.domain parameter to a right-hand, fully-qualified fragment of its current host name (e.g., foo.bar.example.com may set it to example.com, but not ample.com). If two pages explicitly and mutually set their respective document.domain parameters to the same value, and the remaining same-origin checks are satisfied, access is granted. If neither of the above conditions is satisfied, access is denied.

Info from Mozilla

I can not access the properties of the new secondary window. I always get an error in the javascript console saying "Error: uncaught exception: Permission denied to get property . Why is that?

It is because of the cross-domain script security restriction (also referred as the "Same Origin Policy"). A script loaded in a window (or frame) from a distinct origin (domain name) cannot get nor set properties of another window (or frame) or the properties of any of its HTML objects coming from another distinct origin (domain name). Therefore, before executing a script targeting a secondary window, the browser in the main window will verify that the secondary window has the same domain name. More reading on the cross-domain script security restriction: http://www.mozilla.org/projects/secu...me-origin.html

So your answer is

  1. So, if the protocol and hostname and port match for all browsers but IE, it's the same domain
  2. If the protocol and hostname match for IE, it's the same domain

Otherwise, you are restricted.

EDIT - real answer

window.open('javascript:doFunction()') would not do anything except open a new blank window which fails to do anything because doFunction is not defined. It needs to be defined in the same window.

Sidenote I can do the same-origin xhr request by injecting the ajax into the url directly, but it's still susceptible to the same-domain policy.

x = window.open('javascript:x = new XMLHttpRequest; x.open("GET", "http://medero.org", false); x.onreadystatechange = function(){ if ( x.readyState != 4 ) { return; }; alert(x); alert( x.responseText );}; try {x.send(null); } catch (e) { alert(e)}; alert("ok"); ');

It fails in Firefox. And I haven't tested it in MSIE yet. But

Tests:

(failure) Chrome 7 ( console ) from http://stackoverflow.com:80

>>> x = window.open('http://google.com', 'fds', 'width=200, height=300')
>>> x.document.body.innerHTML='test';
TypeError: Cannot read property 'body' of undefined

(success) Chrome 7 ( console ) from http://stackoverflow.com:80

>>> x = window.open('http://stackoverflow.com', 'fds', 'width=200, height=300')
>>> x.document.body.innerHTML='test';
"test"

(failure) Firefox 3.6 ( console ) from http://stackoverflow.com:80

>>> x = window.open('http://google.com', 'fds', 'width=200, height=300')
>>> x.document.body.innerHTML='test';
Permission denied for <http://stackoverflow.com> to get property Window.document from <http://www.google.com>.

(success) Firefox 3.6 ( console ) from http://stackoverflow.com:80

>>> x = window.open('http://stackoverflow.com', 'fds', 'width=200, height=300')
>>> x.document.body.innerHTML='test';
"test"

(failure) Firefox 3.6 ( console ) from http://stackoverflow.com:80

$.ajax({
   url:'http://bing.com',
   success:function(data) {
      alert(data) // blank alert
   }
})

(success) Firefox 3.6 ( console ) from http://stackoverflow.com:80

$.ajax({
   url:'http://stackoverflow.com',
   success:function(data) {
      alert(data) // success
   }
})
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Thank you for your detailed answer. I was aware of the rules of Same-Origin, but was unaware that "javascript: something()" counted as using a different protocol. I suppose this means that the window that somesite.com opens can't perform any Ajax request at all. This is because the Ajax request would have been initiated using a method similar to the one that I was looking into, which counts as using a different protocol, thus violating the same-origin policy. –  Chris Laplante Nov 10 '10 at 20:50
1  
Actually it looks like Chrome treats javascript: from the initial url. medero.org/ajax.html. Firefox doesn't permit it. –  meder Nov 10 '10 at 21:09
1  
Interesting. Here's the bug: code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=30660 –  Chris Laplante Nov 10 '10 at 21:11

The new window opens as about:blank and then runs the javascript in the context of that window. Making AJAX requests from that window, according to meder's comments, would fail because the protocol doesn't match, so you would not be able to open to connect to any http: url.

Your question could be improved if you mention what you really are trying to do, rather than just being curious...

share|improve this answer
    
Meder's comments hold true, no matter what I am trying to do. –  Chris Laplante Nov 10 '10 at 20:25

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