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Sample code:

m1.pm

my $a;
my $b;
sub init {
    $a = shift;
    $b = shift;
}

sub printab {
    print "a = -$a-\n";
    print "b = -$b-\n";
}

1;

m2.pm

my $a;
my $b;
sub init {
    $a = shift;
    $b = shift;
}

1;

test.pl

use strict;
use warnings;

use m1;
use m2;

init('hello', 'world');
printab();

Run:

$ perl test.pl
a = --
b = --
$

What happens is that the init('hello', 'world') call is mapped to m2.pm and initializes the variables ($a and $b) there.

This kind of makes sense, but what I do not understand is why those values are not available in test.pl.

  • Is there something fundamentally wrong that I am trying to do here? What is the correct way to use two modules with same named subroutines and variables?

  • How exactly does a Perl use work? It would help if someone could contrast it with C's #include directive.

share|improve this question
    
For why I need this, please see this SO thread. –  Lazer Nov 10 '10 at 18:30
2  
Is this your complete code? Do either of your modules define an import routine or inherit from Exporter. If not, you aren't exporting the subroutines into test.pl –  Eric Strom Nov 10 '10 at 18:33
    
@Eric: yes, this is all. –  Lazer Nov 10 '10 at 18:38
    
Ok, see my answer for why it is not working. –  Eric Strom Nov 10 '10 at 18:45
1  
Because m1 and m2 say they're theirs, and that other scopes should keep their mitts off of them. –  Axeman Nov 10 '10 at 19:42
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First, do read perldoc perlmod.

You do not declare a namespace in either module, so everything is in the main namespace. Declare package m1; in m1.pm and package m2; in m2.pm.

At the very least, you should implement an import method (or inherit the one Exporter provides) so that programs that use modules can decide what to import from where.

It also seems to me that you are exploring around the edges of OO.

Further:

  • Avoid using $a and $b as variable names because it is easy to confuse them with the package variables $a and $b used by sort.

  • Don't use lower case module names: They are reserved for pragmata.

A minimal implementation (all in one file for testing convenience) looks like this:

package My::M1;

use strict; use warnings;

sub new { my $class = shift; bless { @_ } => $class }

sub a {
    my $self = shift;
    my ($v) = @_;
    $self->{a} = $v if @_;
    return $self->{a};
}

sub b {
    my $self = shift;
    my ($v) = @_;
    $self->{b} = $v if @_;
    return $self->{b};
}

package My::M2;

use strict; use warnings;
use base 'My::M1';

sub printtab {
    my $self = shift;
    for my $x (qw(a b)) {
        printf "%s = -%s-\n", $x, $self->$x;
    }
}

package main;

my $m = My::M2->new(a => 'hello', 'b' => 'world');
$m->printtab;
share|improve this answer
    
Does package name have to be same as the module name? (I dont think so). –  Lazer Nov 10 '10 at 18:39
3  
@Lazer => It does not have to be, but by convention it is. –  Eric Strom Nov 10 '10 at 18:40
1  
@Lazer: No, they don't technically have to be the same. However, exports don't work correctly if they're different because, as Eric Strom said, use Module; implicitly does Module->import() after loading it. If the package in Module is named something other than Module, then Module->import() will be looking at the wrong package and fail to import anything. If you're not exporting, then there's no reason (other than convention) why the package name and module name would need to be the same. –  Dave Sherohman Nov 11 '10 at 10:38
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In Perl, the use keyword is exactly equivalent to the following:

use Mymodule;

#is the same as

BEGIN {
   require Mymodule;
   Mymodule->import();
}

So if you are not defining an import routine in your code (or inheriting from Exporter), then your modules are not importing anything into test.pl

As Sinan caught, you are not declaring a package in your modules, so they are defaulting to the main package. In that case, all of your subroutines are in main, but the lexical variables (declared with my) are only scoped to the file they are declared in.

So m1 defines sub init and sub printab to which the lexicals $a and $b are in scope. But then when test.pl loads m2, the init routine is overwritten with the new definition, which is not closed around the two lexicals anymore. So it is writing to the package variables $main::a and $main::b instead of the lexicals which printab is bound to.

If you had warnings enabled (which you always should when learning), you would have been warned about the subroutine redefinition.

You should start each of your modules with:

package Some::Package::Name;
use warnings;
use strict;

and then end each module with:

1;

This is because when you use/require a module, it needs to return a true value at the end so that Perl knows it loaded properly.

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printab() is defined in the file m1.pm and only has access to the $a and $b variables that are scoped to that file. The variables $a and $b in m2.pm are scoped to that file, and they are different variables than the $a and $b in m1.pm.

init() sets the variables scoped in m2.pm (because that's the last place the &init function was defined) so it is not setting the same variables that printab() will be trying to print.

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1  
@DVK - No, I meant what I said. Adding a package Foo at the top of every file in the OP won't make the lexical variables from one file visible in another file. –  mob Nov 10 '10 at 19:47
    
rule - will the scope persist across package boundaries within the same file? E.g. package A; my $var1 = "x"; 1; package B; print $var1; - will the print $var1 see the variable delcared "in" the A package? –  DVK Nov 10 '10 at 21:05
2  
@DVK => a my variable is block scoped (where the end of file constitutes an end of block), so in your example, $var1 is visible in both packages. When I am using more than one package in a file, I usually enclose the entire package declaration in a block: {package ...; ....} so that the lexicals don't leak out –  Eric Strom Nov 10 '10 at 21:09
    
@Eric - then I stand corrected, it is indeed the file an not the package scope. For some reason I was under impression that a enw package imposes new block scope. –  DVK Nov 10 '10 at 21:35
    
@DVK: no, you need to explicitly create a new scope around a package declaration if you need that. –  Ether Nov 11 '10 at 0:13
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