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I'm using standard python logging module in my python application:

import logging
logging.basicConfig(level=logging.INFO)
logger = logging.getLogger("log")
while True:
  logger.debug('Stupid log message " + ' '.join([str(i) for i in range(20)]) )
  # Do something

The issue is that although debug level is not enable, that stupid log message is evaluated on each loop iteration, which harms performance badly.

Is there any solution for this?

In C++ we have log4cxx package that provides macros like this:
LOG4CXX_DEBUG(logger, messasage)
That effectively evaluates to

if (log4cxx::debugEnabled(logger)) {
    log4cxx.log(logger,log4cxx::LOG4CXX_DEBUG, message)
}

But since there are no macros in Python (AFAIK), if there a efficient way to do logging?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 31 down vote accepted

The logging module already has partial support for what you want to do. Do this:

log.debug("Some message: a=%s b=%s", a, b)

... instead of this:

log.debug("Some message: a=%s b=%s" % (a, b))

The logging module is smart enough to not produce the complete log message unless the message actually gets logged somewhere.

To apply this feature to your specific request, you could create a lazyjoin class.

class lazyjoin:
    def __init__(self, s, items):
        self.s = s
        self.items = items
    def __str__(self):
        return self.s.join(self.items)

Use it like this (note the use of a generator expression, adding to the laziness):

logger.info('Stupid log message %s', lazyjoin(' ', (str(i) for i in range(20))))

Here is a demo that shows this works.

>>> import logging
>>> logging.basicConfig(level=logging.INFO)
>>> logger = logging.getLogger("log")
>>> class DoNotStr:
...     def __str__(self):
...         raise AssertionError("the code should not have called this")
... 
>>> logger.info('Message %s', DoNotStr())
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
AssertionError: the code should not have called this
>>> logger.debug('Message %s', DoNotStr())
>>>

In the demo, The logger.info() call hit the assertion error, while logger.debug() did not get that far.

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Great tips! Thank you very-very much! –  Zaar Hai Nov 14 '10 at 19:21
import logging
import time

logging.basicConfig(level=logging.INFO)
logger = logging.getLogger("log")

class Lazy(object):
    def __init__(self,func):
        self.func=func
    def __str__(self):
        return self.func()

logger.debug(Lazy(lambda: time.sleep(20)))

logger.info(Lazy(lambda: "Stupid log message " + ' '.join([str(i) for i in range(20)])))
# INFO:log:Stupid log message 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

If you run the script, you'll notice the first logger.debug command does not take 20 seconds to execute. This shows the argument is not evaluated when the logging level is below the set level.

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Of course the following is not as efficient as a Macro:

if logger.isEnabledFor(logging.DEBUG):
    logger.debug(
        'Stupid log message ' + ' '.join([str(i) for i in range(20)])
    )

but simple and 4 times faster than this:

class lazyjoin:
    def __init__(self, s, items):
        self.s = s
        self.items = items

    def __str__(self):
        return self.s.join(self.items)

logger.debug(
    'Stupid log message %s', lazyjoin(' ', (str(i) for i in range(20)))
)

See benchmark-src for my setup.

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Simple and efficient. I like that. This should earn more upvotes. –  Rockallite Sep 16 at 13:26

As Shane points out, using

log.debug("Some message: a=%s b=%s", a, b)

... instead of this:

log.debug("Some message: a=%s b=%s" % (a, b))

saves some time by only performing the string formatting if the message is actually logged.

This does not completely solve the problem, though, as you may have to pre-process the values to format into the string, such as:

log.debug("Some message: a=%s b=%s", foo.get_a(), foo.get_b())

In that case, obj.get_a() and obj.get_b() will be computed even if no logging happens.

A solution to that would be to use lambda functions, but this requires some extra machinery:

class lazy_log_debug(object):
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.func = func
        logging.debug("%s", self)
    def __str__(self):
        return self.func()

... then you can log with the following:

lazy_log_debug(lambda: "Some message: a=%s b=%s" % (foo.get_a(), foo.get_b()))

In that case, the lambda function will only be called if log.debug decides to perform the formatting, hence calling the __str__ method.

Mind you: the overhead of that solution may very well exceed the benefit :-) But at least in theory, it makes it possible to do perfectly lazy logging.

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If you really want to disable debug logging everywhere than you could do something like this:

logger.debug = lambda *a, **kw: None

That's as fast as you can get it without actually removing the statements.

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2  
This wont work because the argument will still be evaluated. The evaluation happens before the function is even called. –  aaronasterling Nov 10 '10 at 20:39
    
@aaronasterling: that's true, a JIT compiler would help a lot here. For this special case one could consider writing a function that does this automatically when passed a list of arguments. –  Wolph Nov 10 '10 at 21:08
    
I'm sorry, how does JIT'ing it work again? It seems that the code would still get executed. A compiler (JIT or otherwise) could modify it so that the code isn't executed unless the result is used but that's a lot easier in a purely functional language where it knows that there are no side effects which might be desired anyways. Also, what would the function do when passed a list of arguments? I don't see how that helps in a general case either. If you mean formatting the string, then the function would have to be rewritten for every use. –  aaronasterling Nov 10 '10 at 21:15
    
@aaronasterling: A JIT compiler should be able to detect that the code doesn't actually modify anything so it can simply remove it. In a purely functional language that would be much easier indeed, but in Python (Psyco can probably do it) some things are still possible. As for the general case, it would be trivial to write a function that simply appends all the parameters after eachother separated by space (which is basically what this function does). –  Wolph Nov 10 '10 at 21:40

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