Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Is there a better way to write this code without using goto? It seems awkward, but I can't think of a better way. I need to be able to perform one retry attempt, but I don't want to duplicate any code.

public void Write(string body)
{
    bool retry = false;
RetryPoint:
    try
    {
        m_Outputfile.Write(body);
        m_Outputfile.Flush();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        if( retry )
            throw; 
        // try to re-open the file...
        m_Outputfile = new StreamWriter(m_Filepath, true);
        retry = true;
        goto RetryPoint;
    }
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by ChrisF May 5 '13 at 11:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

8  
sorry, can't resist! xkcd.com/292 –  Joe Nov 10 '10 at 20:44
2  
There's ALWAYS a better way to write logic without a goto. –  Paul Sonier Nov 10 '10 at 20:48
1  
@McWafflestix: I disagree. There are some very rare cases where using goto in fact yields cleaner code -- breaking out of nested loops is a commonly cited example (since C# does not have labeled breaks like Java). See stackoverflow.com/questions/2542289/… for more. –  Heinzi Nov 11 '10 at 23:52
    
@Heinzi: Okay, your point is taken: for certain conditions of very bad code, using goto can yield cleaner code; I'd classify that as a smell, though, and a particularly bad one. –  Paul Sonier Nov 12 '10 at 0:52
    
@McWafflestix: And an easily fixed one. It's usually an indicator of excessive nesting depth in a method. –  Steven Sudit Nov 12 '10 at 23:18
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Here is the basic logic that I would use instead of a goto statement:

bool succeeded = false;
int tries = 2;

do
{
    try
    {
        m_Outputfile = new StreamWriter(m_Filepath, true);
        m_Outputfile.Write(body); 
        m_Outputfile.Flush(); 
        succeeded = true;
    }
    catch(Exception)
    {
        tries--;
    }
}
while (!succeeded && tries > 0);

I just added # of tries logic, even though the original question didn't have any.

share|improve this answer
    
This performs infinite tries, uses C++ syntax for the catch, and doesn't rethrow. I have no idea why it was upvoted when it's clearly wrong. –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 20:55
    
Oh, and it doesn't reopen on failure. –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 20:57
2  
@Steven Sudit: The body of the catch block is implied to be the same as the original code. –  LBushkin Nov 10 '10 at 21:04
    
@LBushkin, not without some changes. The original catch block won't even compile in this code. In any case, this still retries forever, which is not the goal. –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 21:08
1  
The catch block needs to Close the streamwriter! –  Steven Sudit Nov 11 '10 at 15:38
show 2 more comments

Michael's solution doesn't quite fulfill the requirements, which are to retry a fixed number of times, throwing the last failure.

For this, I would recommend a simple for loop, counting down. If you succeed, exit with break (or, if convenient, return). Otherwise, let the catch check to see if the index is down to 0. If so, rethrow instead of logging or ignoring.

public void Write(string body, bool retryOnError)
{
    for (int tries = MaxRetries; tries >= 0; tries--)
    {
        try
        {
            _outputfile.Write(body);
            _outputfile.Flush();
            break;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            if (tries == 0)
                throw; 

            _outputfile.Close();
            _outputfile = new StreamWriter(_filepath, true);
        }
    }
}

In the example above, a return would have been fine, but I wanted to show the general case.

share|improve this answer
1  
if (tries == 0) –  Anthony Pegram Nov 10 '10 at 21:03
    
@Anthony: Thank you, that was a mistake. I'll fix it immediately. –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 21:08
    
I just made one more change that I think is applicable to any solution: I made it Close the old streamwriter before opening a new one. If this isn't done, then the old one would keep a handle open until GC kicks in, blocking new ones from working! –  Steven Sudit Nov 11 '10 at 15:38
add comment

@Michael's answer (with a correctly implemented out catch block) is probably the easiest to use in your case, and is the simplest. But in the interest of presenting alternatives, here is a version that factors the "retry" flow control into a separate method:

// define a flow control method that performs an action, with an optional retry
public static void WithRetry( Action action, Action recovery )
{
    try {
        action(); 
    }
    catch (Exception) {
        recovery();
        action();
    }
}

public void Send(string body)
{
    WithRetry(() =>
    // action logic:
    {
       m_Outputfile.Write(body);
       m_Outputfile.Flush();
    },
    // retry logic:
    () =>
    {
       m_Outputfile = new StreamWriter(m_Filepath, true);
    });
}

You could, of course, improve this with things like retry counts, better error propagation, and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm really not sure what to make of this. Arguably, this sort of delegate-driven solution is elegant, flexible and reusable. Then again, it currently doesn't actually do what's needed. In the end, I'm going to neither up- nor down-vote. –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 21:10
    
@Steven: Did I miss something? In what way does it not fulfill the requirements? –  LBushkin Nov 10 '10 at 21:12
    
The ways you mentioned: doesn't have a retry count, doesn't throw on last try, etc. No doubt you can make it do what's needed -- I've seen enough of your answers to be certain of that -- but you haven't at this time. –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 21:13
2  
@Steven: Well, in all fairness, the OP never mentioned a need to perform multiple retries, and in fact, as the original code is written it will only perform a retry once. As for throwing on the last attempt, the code should do that, since the action delegate is re-invoked in the catch block. –  LBushkin Nov 10 '10 at 21:15
    
If all we want to do is retry once, we can skip all the delegates and loops, instead hard-coding it. I would hope that we can do better than this sort of brute-force solution, particularly given how it fails for larger numbers of retries. –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 21:20
show 5 more comments

What if you put it in a loop? Something similar to this, maybe.

while(tryToOpenFile)
{
    try
    {
        //some code
    }
    catch
    {
    }
    finally
    {
        //set tryToOpenFile to false when you need to break
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This has infinite retries and generally does not solve the problem. –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 20:52
    
Yeah, which is why I said something similar. The idea was to do it in a loop, which seems to be the general idea in every answer here. –  Joe Nov 10 '10 at 20:54
    
Right, using a loop is pretty obvious (although not universal). The devil is in the details. –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 20:57
add comment
public void Write(string body, bool retryOnError)
{
    try
    {
        m_Outputfile.Write(body);
        m_Outputfile.Flush();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        if(!retryOnError)
            throw; 
        // try to re-open the file...
        m_Outputfile = new StreamWriter(m_Filepath, true);
        Write(body, false);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Recursion? Really? –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 20:56
    
@Steven: Sure, why not? It's a simple tail recursion and very readable: Write(body, false) quite clearly documents the writer's intention (try the same again but do not retry) and it avoids cluttering the code (no loop, no succeeded variable). Replacing retryOnError with a retry count is also an easy exercise... –  Heinzi Nov 11 '10 at 6:39
    
A few reasons. Due to the way GC works, recursion keeps objects alive longer, so it should be avoided when an iterative solution is sufficiently clear. When the tail recursion optimization is possible, this is less of an issue. This example recurses no more than once, but you would change the bool to a retry countdown if you wanted to increase that (and you likely would). Such a change would magnify the effects. –  Steven Sudit Nov 11 '10 at 15:33
    
But aside from this optimization issue, my main concern is that this problem does not lend itself particularly well to a recursive solution, so the code is going to be harder to understand and maintain. The iterative version makes its loop explicit instead of expecting the reader to notice that the third "Write" they see is actually a recursive call. A bool flag isn't needed, regardless, since the retry countdown doubles as an indicator of when we should rethrow. –  Steven Sudit Nov 11 '10 at 15:36
    
@Steven: True, it's definitely not one of those examples where recursion beats iteration (and +1 to your iterative solution without the flag, BTW). I still consider it a valid (and hopefully instructive) alternative, so I won't delete the answer. One advantage I see in the recursive solution is that the error-handling code is completely inside the catch clause (except for the additional parameter), so the code represents the natural (non-exceptional) flow of the program. The iterative solution, on the other hand, starts with a big loop which is only used in exceptional circumstances. –  Heinzi Nov 11 '10 at 17:57
show 1 more comment

Try something like the following:

int tryCount = 0;
bool succeeded = false;

while(!succeeded && tryCount<2){
    tryCount++;
    try{
        //interesting stuff here that may fail.

        succeeded=true;
    } catch {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The bool is not needed. More to the point, this does not throw the last failure. –  Steven Sudit Nov 10 '10 at 20:51
add comment

with a boolean

public void Write(string body)
{
        bool NotFailedOnce = true;            
        while (true)
        {
            try
            {
                 _outputfile.Write(body);
                 _outputfile.Flush();           
                 return;                    
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                NotFailedOnce = !NotFailedOnce;
                if (NotFailedOnce)
                {
                    throw;
                }
                else
                {
                     m_Outputfile = new StreamWriter(m_Filepath, true);
                }
            }
      }        
}
share|improve this answer
    
This can't possible work. For one thing, NotFailedOnce = !NotFailedOnce) will always be false, so it'll never throw. Instead, it'll loop forever. –  Steven Sudit Nov 11 '10 at 4:49
    
@Steve, look at the code again, it is not an equality check, but an assignment. –  Jimmy Nov 11 '10 at 9:48
    
that's clever, meaning bad. The compiler will generate warnings for that, and it ought to, since an assignment in the middle of a predicate is most likely due to a typo. Likewise, it's clever/bad to set a bool to false by NOTing it instead of, you know, setting it to false. This code is unnecessarily obfuscated. –  Steven Sudit Nov 11 '10 at 15:29
    
@Steven- agree with the point of assignment in the if(), I changed that. However, NOTing is completely different from setting it to false. It is the NOTing which will make sure it works only once. –  Jimmy Nov 11 '10 at 17:29
    
Thanks for moving the assignment out of the predicate. If you look at the flow, you'll see that you could have had a HasFailed, instead. It would be set right above the line that instantiates a streamwriter. Much simpler that way. Also, there's no need for an else (or all those braces), as a throw exits the current flow. –  Steven Sudit Nov 11 '10 at 18:33
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.