Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following program flow:

pthread_rwlock_rdlock( &mylock);
... compute a lot, maybe be the target of a pthread_cancel() ...
pthread_rwlock_unlock( &mylock);

that is going to leave the lock in a rdlock state if thread is canceled.

It appears that the "right" thing to do is to use pthread_cleanup_push() and pthread_cleanup_pop() and do the unlock inside my cleanup function, but there doesn't seem to be a valid order for the function calls:

void my_cleanup(void *arg) { pthread_rwlock_unlock(&mylock); }
...
pthread_cleanup_push( my_cleanup, 0);
/* A */
pthread_rwlock_rdlock( &mylock);
... compute a lot, maybe be the target of a pthread_cancel() ...
pthread_cleanup_pop( 1);

... that appears nearly correct, except that if the pthread_cancel() hits at "A" then the cleanup will unlock a mylock which is not yet locked leading to undefined behavior.

The whole answer may be:

void my_cleanup(void *arg) { pthread_rwlock_unlock(&mylock); }
...

pthread_setcancelstate( PTHREAD_CANCEL_DISABLE, &oldstate);
pthread_cleanup_push( my_cleanup, 0);
pthread_rwlock_rdlock( &mylock);
pthread_setcancelstate( oldstate, 0);
... compute a lot, maybe be the target of a pthread_cancel() ...
pthread_cleanup_pop( 1);

but at that point it seems like I'm wrapping some well defined primitives in bandages.

So is there a better idiom for this?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I took a look at the glibc/nptl source and I don't see a better way than what you suggested. There's not even enough state in a rwlock for you to "cheat" and trust that the unlock side will know if you got the lock or not. If you didn't acquire the lock but someone else did, a spurious unlock will corrupt the state (rather than returning error).

In fact, offhand I can't find a reason why a well-placed SIGCANCEL couldn't interrupt pthread_rwlock_rdlock itself and leave the lll_lock (glibc internal) lock held, causing all other access to the rwlock to hang. So your PTHREAD_CANCEL_DISABLE might be even more important. Add one around the cleanup as well if you really plan to create/cancel many of these threads. It would be worth writing a test program to stress-test it.

share|improve this answer
    
pthread_rwlock_rdlock is not a cancellation point, so you don't have to consider it. tHeDoc's answer is correct. Cancellation is not asynchronous by default, and if you did enable async cancellation, you are not allowed to call any library functions except those related to disabling cancellation - certainly not locking primitives. –  R.. Jun 1 '11 at 23:44
add comment

Unless you allow asynchronous cancel, the pending pthread_cancel() will be processed only at known points. Therefore it should be safe to push just after successfully locking, and the pop just before unlocking.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer is correct. The accepted answer is wrong. –  R.. Jun 1 '11 at 23:44
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.