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Why are properties of an instance that store primitive values, not references, updated when the prototype is updated if the property has not been set by the instance itself?

Let me give an example:

var Obj = function () {};
Obj.prototype.num = 1;

var myObj = new Obj();
var myOtherObj = new Obj();
console.log(myObj.num); //logs 1
console.log(myOtherObj.num); //logs 1

//After instances are created they still share the value (which is strange):
Obj.prototype.num = 3;
console.log(myObj.num); //logs 3
console.log(myOtherObj.num); //logs 3

//Update one of the instances property
myObj.num += 2;
console.log(myObj.num); //logs 5
console.log(myOtherObj.num); //logs 3

//Here it gets weird:
Obj.prototype.num = 4;
console.log(myObj.num); //logs 5 not updated
console.log(myOtherObj.num); //logs 4 updated

Couple of weird things here:

After an instance is created, updating the class definition updates the instance value if and only if it's never been updated by the instance itself.

If I attempt to reason it out, it seems like the initially the instance does not have its own num property and a lookup happens where it's discovered on the prototype, but once you actually set the property (internally with this.num or externally with instanceName.num) you create a property on the instance.

That doesn't seem to jive with what the ECMA5 specification says:

The value of the prototype property is used to initialise the [[Prototype]] internal property of a newly created object before the Function object is invoked as a constructor for that newly created object.

Sounds like it's supposed to populate the instances internal [[Prototype]], but yet it's still able to be modified by updating the constructor's prototype property. I get that if I set the class definition's property to an object like an array that the reference is actually getting passed to the instance and updating the array anywhere will modify the property for everyone, but these are primitive values and it doesn't seem to make much sense.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The way this works is that properties are looked up on the object first, then if they're not found, by looking them up in the prototype.

If I attempt to reason it out, it seems like the initially the instance does not have its own num property and a lookup happens where it's discovered on the prototype, but once you actually set the property (internally with this.num or externally with instanceName.num) you create a property on the instance.property on the instance.

This is exactly how it works. If you want to remove the property that's set on an object, you can use delete:

delete myOtherObj.num;

this will remove myOtherObj's num property and allow the prototype version to show through.

The portion of the spec that you quoted is attempting to explain how the internal [[Prototype]] property is set for newly-created instances. Other than its role in property lookup, [[Prototype]] is like any other Javascript object reference.

So, when the "prototype" property of the constructor is "copied" into [[Prototype]] for a newly-created object, it actually gets a reference to the original prototype property on the constructor, which can be modified later.


As another example:

function Obj() {};
Obj.prototype.num=1;

var myObj = new Obj();
console.log(myObj.num); // logs 1

Obj.prototype = {num:3}; // replaces Obj.prototype
console.log(myObj.num); // logs 1

var myOtherObj = new Obj(); 
console.log(myOtherObj.num); // logs 3
console.log(myObj.num); // still logs 1

Note that once the object has been constructed, it keeps a reference to whatever object was set as the constructor's prototype at the time the constructor was called. Changing a property on that object will still affect any other references to the same prototype.

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Aha. That makes sense. Thanks. –  Bjorn Tipling Nov 10 '10 at 21:25

This is completely normal, not weird. ;)

When you try to access a property of an object, that's not set in that object, the JS engine gets up the prototype chain and tries to read it there. This is true as long as the property is not explicitly set in that object.

When you change a prototype of a class the object has inherited, the property on the object itself doesn't change, it is just still not set and the property of the class is still read.

Only when you set a certain property of an object, the property is defined within that object. This is also why a certain property of an already declared object changes, when you change an object's prototype.

To clarify:

Obj.prototype.num = 3;
console.log(myObj.num); //logs 3
console.log(myOtherObj.num); //logs 3

Here you actually still read Obj.prototype.num.

myObj.num += 2;

Here you actually read Obj.prototype.num and write to myObj.num.

Obj.prototype.num = 4;
console.log(myObj.num); //logs 5 not updated
console.log(myOtherObj.num); //logs 4 updated

Now you read myObj.num and Obj.prototype.num, respectively.

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Others will explain this better than I, so fellow SO users, feel free to critique my answer. I'll delete if it is terribly egregious.


Think of it like inheritance. If an object that was created from the constructor doesn't have its own num property, it looks to its prototype (or parent or super or whatever) for the value.

So whatever that value is, is the value you'll get. Update it, and any object that looks to it will find that updated value.

I believe the prototyped properties are not copied for each instance, but rather are "looked up" by the instance. As such, the values of the prototyped properties don't really add to the size of the object, since the all share the same set.


EDIT: This may help too. Sections 4.3.4 and 4.3.5 under Definitions in the spec, 5th edition.

4.3.4

constructor

Function object that creates and initialises objects. NOTE The value of a constructor’s “prototype” property is a prototype object that is used to implement inheritance and shared properties.

4.3.5

prototype

object that provides shared properties for other objects.

NOTE When a constructor creates an object, that object implicitly references the constructor’s “prototype” property for the purpose of resolving property references. The constructor’s “prototype” property can be referenced by the program expression constructor.prototype, and properties added to an object’s prototype are shared, through inheritance, by all objects sharing the prototype. Alternatively, a new object may be created with an explicitly specified prototype by using the Object.create built-in function.

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