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Hey, I'm new to Objective-C and as well as programming with Cocoa at all.. anyways my code looks like:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
printf("how many address would you like to input?\n");
int numAddresses;
scanf("%i", &numAddresses);
char *inputString;

NSMutableArray * arrayOfBooks = [NSMutableArray array];
for (int i = 0; i < numAddresses; ++i) {
 book * f = [[book alloc] init];


 printf("Please input the name of contact %i\n", i+1);
 scanf("%s",inputString);
 [f setName: inputString];

 printf("Please input the address of contact %i\n", i+1);
 scanf("%s", inputString);
 [f setAddress: inputString];

 printf("Please input the birthday of contact %i\n", i+1);
 scanf("%s", inputString);
 [f setBirthday: inputString];

 printf("Please input the phone number of contact %i\n", i+1);
 scanf("%s", inputString);
 [f setPhoneNumber: inputString];

 [f print]; 

 [arrayOfBooks addObject:f];
 [f release];
 }

for(int i = 0; i < numAddresses; i++){
 [arrayOfBooks[i] print];

}

return 0;
 }

I'm basically just making an address book. When I input the first name, it throws an "EXC_BAD_ACCESS" error. Why?

#import "book.h"


@implementation book

-(void) setName: (char*) nameInput{
name = nameInput;

 }

-(void) setAddress: (char*) addressInput{
address = addressInput;

}

-(void) setPhoneNumber: (char*) phoneNumberInput{
phoneNumber = phoneNumberInput;
}

-(void) setBirthday: (char*) birthdayInput{
birthday = birthdayInput;
}

-(void) print{
printf("Name: %s\n", name);
printf("Address: %s\n", address);
printf("Phone Number: %s\n", phoneNumber);
printf("Birthday: %s\n", birthday);
 }

@end

EDIT: I no longer get the error.. but now I have a new problem. It prompts me for the name input, then instantly prompts me for the address input before I have a chance to do anything. Why could this be happening?

share|improve this question
    
Not related to your EXC_BAD_ACCESS error, but if you're actual goal is to make an address book application, you should probably use the AddressBook framework. –  Alex Martini Nov 10 '10 at 21:01
1  
Also, you should always check the return value of scanf. scanf returns the number of items that were successfully parsed, so in your code, each invocation of scanf should return 1. If it doesn't return 1, that means an error occurred. –  dreamlax Nov 10 '10 at 21:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A good idea is to use fgets() instead of scanf(). Any whitespace (spaces, tabs, newlines etc.) will cause scanf() to stop parsing, which—based on the input you are trying to obtain—is probably not what you want.

Use fgets() like this:

char lineBuffer[100]; // or some number large enough

puts("Enter something:");
if (fgets(lineBuffer, sizeof lineBuffer, stdin))
{
    // lineBuffer contains the input, but it also contains the '\n' at the end.
    doSomething(lineBuffer);
    // etc. etc.
}
share|improve this answer

"inputstring" is just a char * - it is unassigned, and has no storage associated with it.

You have to pass it a pointer to an array of sufficient size, of use the "a" modifier and pass a pointer to a pointer to a char for scanf to allocate for you.

See the man page on scanf http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Darwin/Reference/ManPages/man3/scanf.3.html

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, that makes a lot of sense.. but it just brings me to a new problem I'm having. Once I have input the name/address/etc. it sets them, but all of them are somehow set to whatever I input last. –  submergd Nov 10 '10 at 21:10
1  
You're re-reading to the same buffer - then uour "set" routines are just pointing them all to that same buffer. You need to copy the data to unique NSStrings. –  Brad Nov 10 '10 at 21:43

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