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In java, I might have an object a with a bunch of properties like getColor. I then might make a second object b (possibly of the same class) that behaves similarly to object a in the sense that it does the same thing as a unless one of it's values is specifically changed (and unchanged, too).

a = new Foo()
b = new FooWhichRefersToAnotherFoo(a)

a.getColor() # returns blue
b.getColor() # returns blue
a.setColor(red)
b.getColor() # returns red
b.setColor(pink)
b.getColor() # returns pink
a.getColor() # returns red (unchanged)
b.deleteChangeToColor()
b.getColor() # returns red as it is now pointing back to a

I would assume it would be some kind of tree hierarchy as if I had c pointing to b pointing to a, the object would work up the chain to the first specified value or the default value of the original unparented object.

Does a pattern like this exist similar that works well with java? I would expect the first class would be one class, and the second would be an inherited class, which keeps track of which class it's instancing, and if it's own property is not set, queries the parent object.

I figure I can do this myself where every class I make, I can create a separate class like

class Foo {
  Color color = new Color("red");
  Color getColor() { color }
}

class FooInstance extends Foo {
  Foo parent = null;

  FooInstance(Foo parent) {
    this.parent = parent;
  }

  Color getColor() {
    if (color == null) return parent.getColor();
    else return color;
  }
}

but wanted to make sure there wasn't some easier mechanism for that like using javabeans or something. One problem with inheritance is it exposes all the methods of the parent, while I'd like to possibly specify which ones are actually available in the child, so maybe just a separate class altogether?

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4  
instance is not a verb. –  SLaks Nov 10 '10 at 21:54
    
Says who? dictionary.reference.com/browse/instance –  voodoogiant Nov 10 '10 at 21:57
5  
Regardless of what the dictionary says, "instantiate" is generally the verb form used in programming to indicate "to create an instance of." –  Michael McGowan Nov 10 '10 at 21:59
    
But the instance I'm referring to here isn't the same kind of instance referred to as instantiating an object. The instance here can be completely unrelated to the parent object in terms of class inheritance, for example. Like an instance object in a 3D scene. Maybe instance was a poor choice, but instantiate would mean something other that what I intended. I'll reword my question a bit. Thanks. –  voodoogiant Nov 10 '10 at 22:02
    
If you do not mean instantiate then I think instance was a poor choice, as it's rather unclear what you mean. –  Michael McGowan Nov 10 '10 at 22:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've read your post a couple of times and there are some things about it that still confuse me. For example, in your a/b/c example you talk about behaviour being the same unless a value is different. I think you need to separate the concepts of behaviour and state more clearly. Behaviour being what a class will do, state being the values of it's properties. The behaviour of a class if often dependant on the state, i.e.:

Color getColor() {
    if (color == null) return parent.getColor();
    else return color;
}

But they are two different things. From your examples I don't think you would need two or more different classes. You could recode Foo and FooInstance as a single class as follows:

class Foo {
    Foo parent = null;
    Color color;

    Foo(Foo parent) {
        this.parent = parent;
    }

    Color getColor() {
        //If there is no parent we have to return color regardless.
        if (parent == null) {
            return color;
        }

        // If there is a parent we can choose which to return.
        return color == null ? parent.getColor() : color;
    }

    void setColor(Color color) {
        this.color = color;
    }
}

Unless you needed different behaviour from your FooInstance, you can do what you require with a single class.

I don't know of any third party API which provides this sort of data structure. But they may exist.

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Looking at the various options over the past few days here and on the internet, this seems to be the most robust option for what I need. I guess I was hoping for some magic bullet, but I think it probably would have abstracted a lot of control I would have needed anyway. Thanks. –  voodoogiant Nov 11 '10 at 17:15

There is a little-known feature of java.util.Properties that allows you to create this kind of hierarchy with no special code:

package stackoverflow;
import java.util.Properties;

public class Main {
    static Properties propsBase;
    static Properties propsOverlay;
    static Properties propsOverlayOverlay;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        propsBase = new Properties();
        propsOverlay = new Properties(propsBase);
        propsOverlayOverlay = new Properties(propsOverlay);

        propsBase.setProperty("key1", "value1");
        propsBase.setProperty("key2", "value2");
        debugAllProps();

        propsOverlay.setProperty("key1", "overlayValue1");
        debugAllProps();

        propsOverlayOverlay.setProperty("key1", "overlayOverlayValue1");
        debugAllProps();

        propsOverlayOverlay.remove("key1");
        debugAllProps();

        propsOverlay.remove("key1");
        debugAllProps();
    }

    private static void debugAllProps() {
        printProps("propsBase", propsBase);
        printProps("propsOverlay", propsOverlay);
        printProps("propsOverlayOverlay", propsOverlayOverlay);
        System.out.println("------------------------------------------------");
    }

    private static void printProps(String desc, Properties props) {
        System.out.printf("%-25s", desc + " sees:");
        for (String key : props.stringPropertyNames()) {
            System.out.printf(" %s=%s", key, props.getProperty(key));
        }
        System.out.println();
    }
}


Output:

propsBase sees:           key2=value2 key1=value1
propsOverlay sees:        key2=value2 key1=value1
propsOverlayOverlay sees: key2=value2 key1=value1
-------------------------------------------------
propsBase sees:           key2=value2 key1=value1
propsOverlay sees:        key2=value2 key1=overlayValue1
propsOverlayOverlay sees: key2=value2 key1=overlayValue1
-------------------------------------------------
propsBase sees:           key2=value2 key1=value1
propsOverlay sees:        key2=value2 key1=overlayValue1
propsOverlayOverlay sees: key2=value2 key1=overlayOverlayValue1
-------------------------------------------------
propsBase sees:           key2=value2 key1=value1
propsOverlay sees:        key2=value2 key1=overlayValue1
propsOverlayOverlay sees: key2=value2 key1=overlayValue1
-------------------------------------------------
propsBase sees:           key2=value2 key1=value1
propsOverlay sees:        key2=value2 key1=value1
propsOverlayOverlay sees: key2=value2 key1=value1

There are some important limitations to this approach:

  • Because this is java.util.Properties, you can only store and retrieve String values.

  • You have to be careful to only use the accessor methods defined by java.util.Properties, as the methods defined by its superclass, Hashtable, do not know about the hierarchy and ignore it.

If I were doing anything serious, I'd probably not use java.util.Properties, but rather design my own collection using Properties's general approach as inspiration. You can read the source code to java.util.Properties by looking in src.zip, which is installed with the JDK.

My take on the collection would

  • Allow Object keys and Object values
  • Have methods that allow inspection and modification of the hierarchy chain
  • Probably wouldn't subclass any existing collection -- mostly to avoid having to make every superclass method "hierarchy-aware." Probably rather decorate a HashMap.
  • Might implement a few java.util collection interfaces if it made sense to
  • Might support generics
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It looks like you are trying to implement behavior similar to CSS -- particularly the Cascading part. This is not a particularly common pattern, but I've had to implement that sort of thing before. IMO, I wouldn't split the type up into Foo and FooInstance -- I'd make a single class that would handle this pattern in a general way, probably by using a HashMap for the property values. In this way, you could automatically handle the null case and bubble up to the parent. Something like:

public class Foo {
    private Foo parent;
    private HashMap<string, Object> propertyValues = new HashMap<string, Object)>();

    public Foo() {
    }

    public Foo(Foo parent) {
        this.parent = parent;
    }

    protected Object getProperty(string propertyName) {
        if (properties.containsKey(propertyName))
            return properties.get(propertyName);
        else if (parent != null)
            return parent.getProperty(propertyName);
        else
            return null;
    }

    protected void setProperty(string propertyName, value) {
        properties.put(propertyName, value);
    }

    public Color getColor() {
        return (Color)getProperty("color");
    }

    public void setColor(Color color) {
        setProperty("color", color);
    }
}
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I would just do this with the Decorator Pattern. The two classes wouldn't necessarily need to be the same, but would need to implement a common interface and would take the other in the constructor and then let the getter hand off to the wrapped class(es) until one is overriden in a wrapping class. In this example, I only used one class for simplicity, but could be flexible to work with any Colorful. Starting with the test:

import junit.framework.TestCase;

import java.awt.*;

public class CascadingTest extends TestCase {

    public void testCascade() throws Exception {
        Colorful a = new Foo();
        a.setColor(Color.RED);
        assertEquals(Color.RED, a.getColor());

        Colorful b = new Foo(a);
        assertEquals(Color.RED, b.getColor());

        b.setColor(Color.PINK);
        assertEquals(Color.PINK, b.getColor());

        b.setColor(null);
        assertEquals(Color.RED, b.getColor());
    }
}

import java.awt.*;

public interface Colorful {
    Color getColor();
    void setColor(Color color);
}

import java.awt.*;

public class Foo implements Colorful {

    private Color color;
    private Colorful parent;

    public Foo() {}

    public Foo(Colorful parent) {
        this.parent = parent;
    }

    public Color getColor() {
        if (parent != null && this.color == null) {
            return parent.getColor();
        } else {
            return color;
        }
    }

    public void setColor(Color color) {
        this.color = color;
    }
}
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