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actually i am converting a c++ code to delphi, but i have problem to translate this line

PIMAGE_NT_HEADERS header = (BYTE *)lib + ((PIMAGE_DOS_HEADER)lib)->e_lfanew;

to delphi (this is my result at the moment)

var
  lib        : THandle;
  header : PImageNtHeaders;
begin
   //....
  //.....
     header := Pointer(PByte(lib) + PImageDosHeader(lib)._lfanew);   
 end;

but the compiler gives me this message operator not applicable to this operand type

can you help me to translate this line.

share|improve this question
    
That looks a lot like C, not C++. –  Flexo Nov 10 '10 at 22:49
1  
You can't possibly convert C++ to Delphi line-by-line, as there are C++ operations that aren't in Delphi. It is therefore impossible to help you translate a single line, without knowing data definitions, context, and what the code is trying to do. –  David Thornley Nov 10 '10 at 22:50
2  
What are you doing? Parsing PE files? It would be much easier to keep it as C and link to it from Delphi. –  Martin Broadhurst Nov 10 '10 at 22:57
4  
Why the -1 vote? Seems a valid question to me, having trouble converting code between languages... –  David M Nov 10 '10 at 23:39
1  
@David Thornley, come on, it i possible, and is pretty trivial problem, see my text below –  Free Consulting Nov 14 '10 at 18:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted
header := Pointer(Integer(PByte(lib)) + PImageDosHeader(lib)._lfanew);
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Thanks very much. –  Salvador Nov 11 '10 at 0:03
1  
Since you have to cast to Integer anyway, the PByte cast is superfluous. Also, it's wiser to cast to Cardinal rather than Integer, lest you accidentally overflow. –  Rob Kennedy Nov 11 '10 at 0:28
1  
you not need to cast because lib is a THandle wich is declared as a Cardinal so you can use this header := Pointer(lib + PImageDosHeader(lib)._lfanew); –  RRUZ Nov 11 '10 at 0:51
    
Casting a pointer to an Integer might go wrong when using LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE PE flag or in the upcoming Delphi 64 bit compiler. –  Remko Nov 11 '10 at 12:24
    
@Remko: Indeed. Or rather, this is almost guaranteed not to work as is on WIN64. –  500 - Internal Server Error Nov 11 '10 at 16:43

You might be able to sidestep a lot of this. If you're looking for PE image header routines, look up the ImageHlp unit from the RTL, and the JclPeImage unit from the JCL. They've got lots of prebuilt code to make image and image header header work easier.

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the _lfanew member is most likely an offset so it needs to be an integer or DWORD instead of a pointer. Just guessing as I don't use Delhpi but have you tried :-

header := Pointer(PByte(lib) + (DWORD)(PImageDosHeader(lib)._lfanew));

A web search came up with the following : http://www.cheesydoodle.com/?p=175

This code is Delphi based and is using the same library you are. You will most likely find a solution hidden in this code listing on CheesyDoodle.

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Pointer arithmetic is much more limited in delphi, and direct addition is not allowed. You'll have to use the Inc function on your pointers.

example(source ):

    program PointerArithmetic;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils;

procedureWritePointer(P: PDouble);
begin
  Writeln(Format('%8p', [P]));
end;

var
  P: PDouble;

begin
  P := Pointer($50000);
  WritePointer(P);
  Inc(P);    // 00050008 = 00050000 + 1*SizeOf(Double)
  WritePointer(P);
  Inc(P, 6); // 00050038 = 00050000 + 7*Sizeof(Double)
  WritePointer(P);
  Dec(P, 4); // 00050018 = 00050000 + 3*Sizeof(Double)
  WritePointer(P);
  Readln;
end.
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1  
This is incorrect - you can, with the {$POINTERMATH ON} directive. I posted an answer giving more information. –  David M Nov 10 '10 at 23:17
1  
The POINTERMATH directive was added in D2009, so pointer arithmetic is not available in earlier versions. –  Remy Lebeau Nov 11 '10 at 1:37

What you are working on is called RVA (Relative Virtual Address). Basic formula is Address = Base + Displacement. Naturally, Address and Base are untyped pointers while Displacement is signed integer. Object Pascal disallows pointer arithmetics, so typecasting is required. So:

var 
  Address, Base: Pointer; 
  Displacement: Integer;
{ ... }
Address := Pointer(Cardinal(Base) + Displacement);
{ or, in your case }
var
  Module: HMODULE; { opaque type designates module handle and equals to load address }
  NTHeaders: PImageNtHeaders;
begin
  NTHeaders := Pointer(Cardinal(Module) + PImageDosHeader(Module)^._lfanew);
  if NTHeaders^.Signature = ......
share|improve this answer

I don't work in Delphi day-to-day, but I suspect the error is due to one of two things:

  1. Pointer math is not enabled. Delphi, by default, does not allow you to to C-style pointer manipulation, eg adding a number to a pointer to get another pointer - remember Delphi is a 'safe' language. To enable this, turn on pointer math using the {$POINTERMATH ON} directive. This forum posting has some more info too.

  2. This is the bit I can't remember because it's been a while: You may not be able to add pointers of different types - remember the size of what the pointer points to is different. Without knowing what _lfanew is I can't give you more information. If this is the case, get everything in bytes and add those.

You may want to use the Inc function too, to convert your code to be more Delphi-like. Inc will increment a typed pointer by the size of the structure that pointer points to, not by one byte. Pointer math generally is not quite C-style :) I think it's better though, since it's type-aware.

Edit: I noticed Martin Broadhurst's comment on your question pointing out this is probably parsing a PE image. If so, look up the Jedi Code Library's PE image unit. I've never used it but I know it exists, and it's a translation of the C headers. It may include helper functions too. Using it might mean rewriting code rather than converting it, but you'll probably get cleaner, more Delphi-style code at the end.

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