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Assuming I have a xdocument called xd, with the following xml already created.

<Alert>
  <Source>
    <DetectTime>12:03:2010 12:22:21</DetectTime>
  </Source>
</Alert>

How would I be able to add another Alert element, such that the xml becomes:

<Alert>
  <Source>
    <DetectTime>12:03:2010 12:22:21</DetectTime>
  </Source>
</Alert>
<Alert>
</Alert>

Adding an additional elements seems to be fairly easy, but when adding in a top level element it excepts.

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Could you show us the code you are using to add the top level node? –  jdecuyper Nov 11 '10 at 1:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your desired XML structure is invalid; you need a root element in order to add another "Alert" node. The following code shows how to add it when a root node exists:

var xdoc = XDocument.Parse(@"<root>
    <Alert>
    <Source>
        <DetectTime>12:03:2010 12:22:21</DetectTime>
    </Source>
    </Alert>
</root>");
xdoc.Root.Add(new XElement("Alert"));
Console.WriteLine(xdoc);

The above code produces <Alert /> since no child nodes are added to it (this will change once you add to it). If you want the closing tag as you have shown you can use xdoc.Root.Add(new XElement("Alert", String.Empty)); instead.

To verify that your desired output has an invalid structure you can try parsing it using XDocument.Parse similar to what I've shown above.

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Thanks for the quick response Ahmad. The xml I have is being generated dynamically, i.e. on the fly. Static blocks like that are out the window. Its did report an exception, when I tried to add another <Alert> element. –  scope_creep Nov 11 '10 at 12:25
    
So it only seems to work if their is an enclosing element above the element your trying to enter. –  scope_creep Nov 11 '10 at 12:34
    
@scope_creep I'm not sure what your end goal is, but one thought is to concatenate the <root> and </root> tags to your XML, add the elements you need, then use LINQ to do your work and finally extract all Alert nodes out as a string. Again, not sure what your goal is but this would ultimately get you a string with the XML structure you want. Is that something you would be interested in doing? –  Ahmad Mageed Nov 11 '10 at 14:42

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