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How does one make a method in an interface that's not abstract? I know that it CAN be done, I just don't know how.

I'll give an example of my confusion. In Java you can implement java.awt.event.MouseListener, then you must call the method addMouseListener(Object)... passing your class as a parameter, so the MouseListener knows what object to cast from. How is the addMouseListener(Object) method possible?

Someone said I was confusing the way anonymous classes work with interfaces having non-abstract methods. How would you implement an anonymous class within a interface so the implementer can call its methods? I'm very new and still a 'noob' at OOP.

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Here you have a nice article to understand anonymous classes: developer.com/java/other/article.php/3300881/… –  mgv Nov 11 '10 at 1:58
    
Perhaps if you edit the question to outline exactly what it is you are trying to achieve, that will help. You current question is "asked and answered" - that is, you can't do what you are describing. –  Lawrence Dol Nov 11 '10 at 2:26
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you're interested in anonymous inner classes, they work as shown below.

We'll continue with the MouseListener example.

The interface for java.awt.event.MouseListener looks something like this:

public interface  MouseListener {
  void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e);
  void mouseEntered(MouseEvent e);
  void mouseExited(MouseEvent e);
  void mousePressed(MouseEvent e);
  void mouseReleased(MouseEvent e);
}

Somewhere in your app you may want to respond to mouse events, so using an anonymous inner class you could do something like this.

component.addMouseListener(new MouseListener() {
  public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e){/*implementation goes here...*/}
  public void mouseEntered(MouseEvent e){/*implementation goes here...*/}
  public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e){/*implementation goes here...*/}
  public void mousePressed(MouseEvent e){/*implementation goes here...*/}
  public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent e){/*implementation goes here...*/}
});

What you've done here is created a new class (without name, hence anonymous) that implements the MouseListener interface. You have not, as suggested above, created a non-abstract method on an interface.

You could have also just created a new named class ("named class" means regular old class):

class MyMouseListener implements MouseListener {
  public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e){/*implementation goes here...*/}
  public void mouseEntered(MouseEvent e){/*implementation goes here...*/}
  public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e){/*implementation goes here...*/}
  public void mousePressed(MouseEvent e){/*implementation goes here...*/}
  public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent e){/*implementation goes here...*/}
}

Then somewhere else you would do component.addMouseListener(new MyMouseListener());

See the difference?

I hope this helps. Good luck.

P.S. - Read up on inheritance, interfaces, inner classes and anonymous inner classes in Java for a deeper understanding.

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This isn't part of the answer so I'll put it down here. In this particular case the MouseListener interface has a bunch of methods. If you only want to implement a sub-set of the methods you can extend the MouseAdapter. The MouseAdapter is an abstract class with empty implementations for each method. You can extend it anonymously like above and just implement the methods you care about. component.addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() { public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e){/*this is the only method I care about...*/} }); –  Todd Nov 11 '10 at 4:41
    
The answer was utter brilliance... thanks a bunch! I just wanted to understand how it worked; you provided just that and more! –  Ben Nov 11 '10 at 5:23
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Interface methods are by definition public and abstract, so you cannot have non-abstract methods in your interface.

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I know that. How does one make a method in an interface that's not abstract? Or can't it be done? –  Ben Nov 11 '10 at 1:34
2  
You can't. I think you are confusing abstract classes and interfaces. –  mgv Nov 11 '10 at 1:36
1  
I can't be done. That's what mgv just said. All methods on an interface are public and abstract. That means you cannot make a method that is not abstract. –  Todd Nov 11 '10 at 1:38
    
See my comment on Matt's answer to see where my confusion comes from :) –  Ben Nov 11 '10 at 1:43
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No, it can't be done in Java 6 or 7. It will become possible, in a round-about way, as part of project lambda, which is slated for Java 8. The proposed mechanism is called extension methods.

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I'll give an example of my confusion. In Java you can implement java.awt.event.MouseListener, then you must call the method addMouseListener(Object)... passing your class as a parameter, so the MouseListener knows what object to cast from. How is the addMouseListener(Object) method possible? –  Ben Nov 11 '10 at 1:41
    
You are confusing the interface definition with anonymous classes, which allows you to do things like new interface-name () { class-body }. It's just the IMPLEMENTATION of the interface, not the definition. –  mgv Nov 11 '10 at 1:45
    
How would one make a 'anonymous class' within an interface and be able to have the interface's implementer call the anonymous class methods? –  Ben Nov 11 '10 at 2:02
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You're confusing "non-abstract method in interface" with "class implementing an interface". Your question:

How is the addMouseListener(Object) method possible?

It's possible because the object you pass to addMouseListener(MouseListener) (which doesn't take an Object, btw, but an instance of the MouseListener interface) is an instance of a class that implements that interface:

public MyMouseListener implements MouseListener { ... }
addMouseListener(new MyMouseListener());

I'd recommend you read a tutorial on Java (or OO) basics, such as this section of the Java Tutorial.

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So where does the method 'addMouseListener(MouseListener)' come from?... how are you able to access it from the implementing class? I'm obviously not making much sense to people... :( –  Ben Nov 11 '10 at 4:27
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In Java you just can't. Perhaps what you are thinking about is an abstract class.

An abstract class in Java may implement interfaces and define some method signatures while keeping other methods abstract with the "abstract" keyword -- Wikipedia

So, like in a regular class, you can provide implementation to some concrete methods. And, like in an interface, you can declare the signature of abstract methods. Theses methods will be implemented by the concrete classes that extend the abstract one. Like an interface an abstract class cannot be instantiated.

The main practical difference is that concrete classes are created by sub-classing the abstract one. So one concrete class can only extend one abstract class while it could implement many interfaces.

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I'll give an example of my confusion. In Java you can implement java.awt.event.MouseListener, then you must call the method addMouseListener(Object)... passing your class as a parameter, so the MouseListener knows what object to cast from. How is the addMouseListener(Object) method possible and how could I do it? –  Ben Nov 11 '10 at 3:52
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In Java, interface methods are public and abstract by default.

For example:

public interface IPrint{
    public abstract void print();
}

And that is same as:

public interface IPrint{
    void print();
}

So first option is bad practice. Point is that you can't use non-abstract methods inside of interface, because they are abstract by default. But in abstract class you can use non-abstract or abstract methods.

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