Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose you have two classes, as in the example below.

How would you modify SplitObject such that it always returns an object of type t, such as in Main(), where it should return an object of type DerivedClass?

I'm guessing the solution would involve reflection? I haven't learned anything about reflection yet, so I don't know how this would work.

public class BaseClass
{
    float _foo;

    public BaseClass(float foo){_foo = foo}

    public BaseClass SplitObject()
    {
        Type t = GetType();

        // Do something with t 

        _foo = _foo/2f;
        return new BaseClass(_foo); // I want to construct an 
                                   // object of type t instead 
                                  // of type BaseClass
    }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedClass(float foo) : base(foo){}
}

class Program
{
    static void Main() 
    {
        BaseClass foo = new DerivedClass(1f);

        BaseClass bar = foo.SplitObject(); // should return a DerivedObject
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you really wanted to use reflection, you could do something like:

return (BaseClass)Activator.CreateInstance(GetType(), _foo);

Of course, there is now an implicit contract that all derived classes must implement such a constructor. Unfortunately, such contracts cannot be specified in the current type-system; so violations will not be caught at compile-time. It would be much better to go with erash's idea. I would do something like:

//... Base class:   

public BaseClass SplitObject()
{      
    _foo = _foo / 2f;
    return NewInstance(_foo);
}

protected virtual BaseClass NewInstance(float foo)
{
   return new BaseClass(foo);   
}

//... Derived class:

protected override BaseClass NewInstance(float foo)
{
   return new DerivedClass(foo);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The Activator.CreateInstance method was what I was looking for. However, I might go with the virtual methods to not overcomplicate things by requiring that specific constructor signature. I picked your answer because it's a nice short bit of code. –  Tim R. Nov 11 '10 at 2:43

No reflection required -- just make SplitObject() be virtual and implement it differently in your derived classes.

Another option would be to extract the Split behavior into an interface, say ISplittable<T>

public class BaseClass
{
      public virtual BaseClass SplitObject()
      {
           BaseClass splitObject = new BaseClass();
           //initialize the split object
           return splitObject;
      }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
     public override BaseClass SplitObject()
     {
          DerivedClass derivedSplitObject = new DerivedClass();
          //initialize the derived split object
          return derivedSplitObject;
     }
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't want to use the virtual method approach because that involves copying code. I usually don't like anything that requires me to change something in more than one place because they're all using effectively the same code! I'd rather be able to write a method once and have it work the same for any object. –  Tim R. Nov 11 '10 at 2:36

If you only want the code to appear in one place (better for maintenance, especially if there are many derived types), you will need to use reflection:

  public class BaseClass
{
    float _foo;

    public BaseClass(float foo){_foo = foo;}

    public BaseClass SplitObject()
    {
        Type t = GetType();
        _foo = _foo / 2f;

        //Find the constructor that accepts float type and invoke it:
        System.Reflection.ConstructorInfo ci = t.GetConstructor(new Type[]{typeof(float)});
        object o=ci.Invoke(new object[]{_foo});

        return (BaseClass)o; 
    }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedClass(float foo) : base(foo) { }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        BaseClass foo = new DerivedClass(1f);

       //Cast the BaseClass to DerivedClass:
        DerivedClass bar = (DerivedClass)foo.SplitObject(); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.