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I'd like to write some simple code that helps to determine if some instructions have been executed in the intended order client-side. This is to make things difficult for anyone wishing to alter behaviour by editing byte code. For example, using a JMP so some instructions are never executed. I'm a bit short on ideas though.

To check if the last two instructions have been run in the correct order something simple like this could be used (pseudo code):

// Variables initialized by server
int lastInt;
// Monitored at regular intervals
// Saves using callback which could be tampered with 
boolean bSomethingFishyHere;
int array[20]

...
execute( array[5], doStuff1() )
execute( array[6], doStuff2() )
...

// This could be tested remotely with all combinations of values possible
execute( int i, boolean b ){
    if( lastInt >= i ){
        bSomethingFishyHere = true; 
    }

    lastInt = i;
}

I'm at a loss at to what approach could be used to verify if all instructions have been run in the correct order though. Maybe I could add an array and have it populated by the server with some randomly ascending numbers or use some sort checksum. What are your suggestions?

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4  
If someone wants to edit your bytecode, that person can easily put what's necessary in lastInt so that you'll never find out some instructions haven't beed run. – Loïc Février Nov 11 '10 at 3:43
    
True. I have this reflex of always initializing variables. It could of course be initialized by the server before the client-side code kicks in. Of course, many things could be changed depending on how well someone knows the bytecode. With the particular language I'm using, there's hardly any documentation. What I've seen in modified code so far are jumps, modified string values and branch modifications ( == becomes <= or similar) and it dates back to a few years with nothing new since. – James Poulson Nov 11 '10 at 3:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is just to patch some holes in an fps shooter. The designers of the game left some temporary variables that can be changed in the console. Some of them are harmless but others like Texture transparent=true are abusive. What I'm aiming for is to redesign an existing modification so most of the code is on the server as you suggest. The variables in question are set in the "world" that is mimicked by the client. Ultimately, I'm planning to extend some classes so they ignore them and just need to monitor values where this isn't possible.

If you do want a short-term patch, a more practical approach (than the one you are looking at) would to send encrypted bytecodes to the client and using a special classloader to decrypt them on the fly. Beware however that it wouldn't be that difficult for a hacker to reverse engineer the classloader, get hold of the client-side bytecodes, and modify them to install the cheats.

So my advice is that any client-side "patch" to stop users tampering with the bytecodes is never going to be hack-proof. Skip that idea, and go straight to your long term solution of rearchitecting the game so that it is not necessary to trust that the client-side code plays by the rules.

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The problem is, that no matter what kind of book-keeping you do, a malicious user can always do the same book-keeping, but skip over the actual doing stuff. If you can do it, so can they. You can rely on external mechanisms, like code-signing to ensure that your executable hasn't been tampered with and CPU protections to prevent on-the-fly modification of the code in memory. But in that case you're only as secure as the platform you're running on.

I'm assuming this is some sort of copy-protection scheme. (If not, feel free to correct me, and you might get some better, more applicable advice). There isn't a fool-proof way to prevent someone from running your software, but you can license an existing scheme where the vendor has already put enough effort into it, that it's not worth it for an attacker to bother, for the most part.

The one way that is pretty much fool-proof, is if you control the code. Run the real meat of the code on your servers, and provide some sort of front end remote client.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply Eclipse. This is just to patch some holes in an fps shooter. The designers of the game left some temporary variables that can be changed in the console. Some of them are harmless but others like Texture transparent=true are abusive. What I'm aiming for is to redesign an existing modification so most of the code is on the server as you suggest. The variables in question are set in the "world" that is mimicked by the client. Ultimately, I'm planning to extend some classes so they ignore them and just need to monitor values where this isn't possible. – James Poulson Nov 11 '10 at 4:01

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