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I have a list pointer in type of A (called ListA) container a vector of pointers B. (Each A object is a container class that has a private attribute: std<vector> *B). Then, I declare a pointer (called C having the same type as A), make a for-loop through ListA to get all pointers B and put them in C. When I quit my program, I deallocate ListA first, ListA in turn deallocates their own vector of pointers B. Then I deallocate pointer C, but the program crashes.

I have debugged this a bit and know that pointer C at the time of deallocation points to nothing, so it doesn't know what to deallocate.

Am I doing wrong? Or what is the solution for my problems?

Sorry, I'll put my code below

//Class A
#pragma once

#include "MyContainer.h"
class B;
class A
{
public:
    A();
    ~A();
    MyContainer<B> *pListOfB;
}

A::A()
{
    pListOfB = new MyContainer<B>;
}
A::~A()
{
    if(pListOfB)
    {
        delete pListOfB;
        pListOfB = NULL;
    }
}
//Class C
#pragma once

#include "MyContainer.h"
class B;
class C
{
public:
    C();
    ~C();
    MyContainer<B> *pListOfB;
    void getListOfB(MyContainer<A> *pListOfA);
}

C::C()
{
    pListOfB = new MyContainer<B>;
}
C::~C()
{
    if(pListOfB)
    {
        delete pListOfB;
        pListOfB = NULL;
    }
}
void C::getListOfB(MyContainer<A> *pListOfA)
{
    for(pListOfA->isBegin(); !pListOfA->isEnd();)
    {
        A *pA = pListOfA->getNext();
        for(pA->isBegin(); !pA->isEnd();)
        {
            B* pB = pA->*pListOfB->getNext();
            pListOfB->add(pB);
        }
    }
}
//Class MyContainer
#pragma once

#include <vector>

template <class T> 
class MyContainer
{
public:
    MyContainer(void);
    ~MyContainer(void);
    T* getNext();
    void removeAll();
    void add(T* t);
    void isBegin();
    bool isEnd();   
private:
    std::vector<T*> items;  
    typename std::vector<T*>::iterator it;
};

template <class T> MyContainer<T>::~MyContainer()
{
    removeAll();
}

template <class T> void MyContainer<T>::add(T *t)
{
    items.push_back(t);
}

template <class T> void MyContainer<T>::removeAll()
{
    while(!isEmpty())
    {
        std::vector<T*>::iterator tempIt =items.begin();
        T* t = (*tempIt);
        items.erase(tempIt);
        delete t;
        t=NULL;
    }
}

template <class T>
T* MyContainer<T>::getNext()
{
    if(isEnd() || isEmpty())
        return NULL;    
    return (T*)(*(it++));
}

template <class T>
void MyContainer<T>::isBegin()
{
    it = items.begin();
}

template <class T>
bool MyContainer<T>::isEnd()
{
    return it==items.end();
}

I do the following action: 1. Initial a list A object : MyContainer *pListOfA; 2. Insert B data to each A object in pListOfA 3. Initial C object 4. Call C object operation getListOfB to get B data from pListOfA. 5. Quit program

Program first dealloc pListOfA, each A then dealloc their own pListOfB. After that program dealloc C object in turn dealloc pListOfB attribute of C. But pListOfB point to nothing because pListOfA deallocs every data. So my program crash. I fix by rem the line delete pListOfB in the dtor of class C but I got a warning memory leak at that line. That's all my problem. Please show me the right way. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
Yes, you are doing something wrong; your program would not crash otherwise. However, it is going to be extremely difficult to deduce what you are doing wrong from the description above. I recommend showing a minimal program that reproduces the problem. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 11 '10 at 4:33
1  
A std<vector> *B? Are you sure? –  James McNellis Nov 11 '10 at 4:34
1  
Yeah, without code things like "list pointer in type of A" are just really confusing. –  ssube Nov 11 '10 at 4:35
    
I've just added my simplized code. –  ducva Nov 11 '10 at 5:50

2 Answers 2

  • first, you allocate
  • then you "take and put" somewhere (not allocating, just copying pointers)
  • then you deallocate
  • then you deallocate. ...wait
share|improve this answer
    
In other words, you copied the contents of a list to another list, but you're not actually cloning the objects. The lists refer to the same objects. So when you delete the first list's objects, you're also deleting the objects referenced by the second list. Deleting the second list then double deletes an object and crashes. –  John Ripley Feb 8 '11 at 8:10

The right way is not to use plain pointers.

The moment you start to write delete pointer;, you have to reconsider if you really need that pointer and if you do need it, if there is not some pre-packaged smart-pointer class that can take the burden of memory management from you.

The example code you posted can be written entirely without the use of pointers:

//Class A
#pragma once

#include "MyContainer.h"
#include "B.h"

class A
{
public:
    A() { };
    ~A() { };
    MyContainer<B> ListOfB;
};

//Class C
#pragma once

#include "MyContainer.h"
#include "B.h"

class C
{
public:
    C() { };
    ~C() { };
    MyContainer<B> ListOfB;
    void getListOfB(MyContainer<A>& ListOfA);
};

void C::getListOfB(MyContainer<A>& ListOfA)
{
    for(ListOfA.isBegin(); !ListOfA.isEnd();)
    {
        A& anA = ListOfA.getNext();
        for(anA.ListOfB.isBegin(); !anA.ListOfB.isEnd();)
        {
            B aB = anA.ListOfB.getNext();
            ListOfB.add(aB);
        }
    }
}

//Class MyContainer
#pragma once

#include <vector>

template <class T> 
class MyContainer
{
public:
    MyContainer(void);
    ~MyContainer(void) { };
    T& getNext();
    void removeAll();
    void add(const T& t);
    void isBegin();
    bool isEnd();   
private:
    std::vector<T> items;  
    typename std::vector<T>::iterator it;
};

template <class T> void MyContainer<T>::add(const T& t)
{
    items.push_back(t);
}

template <class T> void MyContainer<T>::removeAll()
{
    items.clear();
}

template <class T>
T& MyContainer<T>::getNext()
{
    if(isEnd() || isEmpty())
        return throw std::out_of_range("");
    return *it++;
}

template <class T>
void MyContainer<T>::isBegin()
{
    it = items.begin();
}

template <class T>
bool MyContainer<T>::isEnd()
{
    return it==items.end();
}

If the B instances need to be shared between class A and class C (the lists in A and C refer both to the same B objects), then you could store shared pointers in the lists.

share|improve this answer
    
@downvoter: a comment why the downvote would be nice. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Nov 12 '10 at 14:56
    
Thanks for your help, I will give it a try –  ducva Nov 14 '10 at 16:06
    
My idea behind three class A B C is synchronize data between class A and C. It means when class B is changed by class A or C, the other class will know that change. So I decide class A and C point to the same data. But after days for testing and thinking, I recognize that what I tried to do will result memory leak. I definitely have to use pointer for passing parameters in my project. So my instant thinking is each class A or C will store a copy of class B and each time I make a change to data of a class, I also have to make a change to the other class. Do you know a better way for my problem? –  ducva Nov 15 '10 at 12:43
    
@ducva: Yes: use boost::shared_ptr (or std::shared_ptr if you have it). The shared_ptr class will take care of the memory management for you and is explicitly designed for the case that two classes need to share ownership of some common data. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Nov 19 '10 at 10:44
    
Thanks for your help. It works :) –  ducva Nov 20 '10 at 12:04

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