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I want to create an efficient circular buffer in python (with the goal of taking averages of the integer values in the buffer).

Is this an efficient way to use a list to collect values?

def add_to_buffer( self, num ):
    self.mylist.pop( 0 )
    self.mylist.append( num )

What would be more efficient (and why)?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 69 down vote accepted

I would use collections.deque with a maxlen arg

>>> import collections
>>> d = collections.deque(maxlen=10)
>>> d
deque([], maxlen=10)
>>> for i in xrange(20):
...     d.append(i)
... 
>>> d
deque([10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19], maxlen=10)

There is a recipe in the docs for deque that is similar to what you want. My assertion that it's the most efficient rests entirely on the fact that it's implemented in C by an incredibly skilled crew that is in the habit of cranking out top notch code.

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3  
+1 Yes it's the nice batteries included way. Operations for the circular buffer are O(1) and as you say the extra overhead is in C, so should still be quite fast –  gnibbler Nov 11 '10 at 9:38

popping from the head of a list causes the whole list to be copied, so is inefficient

You should instead use a list/array of fixed size and an index which moves through the buffer as you add/remove items

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Agree. No matter how elegant or inelegant it may look or whatever language is used. In reality, the less you bother garbage collector (or heap manager or paging/mapping mechanisms or whatever does actual memory magic) the better. –  user215054 Nov 11 '10 at 4:56
    
@RocketSurgeon It's not magic, it's just that it's an array whose first element is deleted. So for an array of size n this means n-1 copy operations. No garbage collector or similar device is involved here. –  Christian Sep 26 '12 at 11:49
2  
I agree. Doing so is also much easier than some people think. Just use an ever increasing counter, and use the modulo operator (% arraylen) when accessing the item. –  Andre Blum Dec 6 '12 at 17:41
    
idem, you may check my post above, that is how I did it –  MoonCactus Dec 5 at 11:47

ok with the use of deque class, but for the requeriments of the question (average) this is my solution:

>>> from collections import deque
>>> class CircularBuffer(deque):
...     def __init__(self, size=0):
...             super(CircularBuffer, self).__init__(maxlen=size)
...     @property
...     def average(self):  # TODO: Make type check for integer or floats
...             return sum(self)/len(self)
...
>>>
>>> cb = CircularBuffer(size=10)
>>> for i in range(20):
...     cb.append(i)
...     print "@%s, Average: %s" % (cb, cb.average)
...
@deque([0], maxlen=10), Average: 0
@deque([0, 1], maxlen=10), Average: 0
@deque([0, 1, 2], maxlen=10), Average: 1
@deque([0, 1, 2, 3], maxlen=10), Average: 1
@deque([0, 1, 2, 3, 4], maxlen=10), Average: 2
@deque([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5], maxlen=10), Average: 2
@deque([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6], maxlen=10), Average: 3
@deque([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], maxlen=10), Average: 3
@deque([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], maxlen=10), Average: 4
@deque([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9], maxlen=10), Average: 4
@deque([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10], maxlen=10), Average: 5
@deque([2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11], maxlen=10), Average: 6
@deque([3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12], maxlen=10), Average: 7
@deque([4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13], maxlen=10), Average: 8
@deque([5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14], maxlen=10), Average: 9
@deque([6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15], maxlen=10), Average: 10
@deque([7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16], maxlen=10), Average: 11
@deque([8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17], maxlen=10), Average: 12
@deque([9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18], maxlen=10), Average: 13
@deque([10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19], maxlen=10), Average: 14
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I get TypeError: 'numpy.float64' object is not callable when trying to call average method –  scls Oct 3 '13 at 13:03
    
Is for my post?, the code don´t use numpy anywhere. ¿? –  SmartElectron Oct 4 '13 at 16:01
    
Yes... in fact I guess that deque uses numpy arrays internally (after removing @property it works fine) –  scls Oct 7 '13 at 7:21
3  
I guarantee that deque does not use numpy arrays internally. collections is part of the standard library, numpy is not. Dependencies on third party libraries would make for a terrible standard library. –  Nathan Hoad May 29 at 11:56

You can also see this quite old Python recipe.

Here is my own version with NumPy array:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import numpy as np

class RingBuffer(object):
    def __init__(self, size_max, default_value=0.0, dtype=float):
        """initialization"""
        self.size_max = size_max

        self._data = np.empty(size_max, dtype=dtype)
        self._data.fill(default_value)

        self.size = 0

    def append(self, value):
        """append an element"""
        self._data = np.roll(self._data, 1)
        self._data[0] = value 

        self.size += 1

        if self.size == self.size_max:
            self.__class__  = RingBufferFull

    def get_all(self):
        """return a list of elements from the oldest to the newest"""
        return(self._data)

    def get_partial(self):
        return(self.get_all()[0:self.size])

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        """get element"""
        return(self._data[key])

    def __repr__(self):
        """return string representation"""
        s = self._data.__repr__()
        s = s + '\t' + str(self.size)
        s = s + '\t' + self.get_all()[::-1].__repr__()
        s = s + '\t' + self.get_partial()[::-1].__repr__()
        return(s)

class RingBufferFull(RingBuffer):
    def append(self, value):
        """append an element when buffer is full"""
        self._data = np.roll(self._data, 1)
        self._data[0] = value
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+1 for using numpy –  shx2 Mar 14 at 21:01

Python's deque is slow. You can also use numpy.roll instead How do you rotate the numbers in an numpy array of shape (n,1)?

In this benchmark, deque is 448ms. Numpy.roll is 29ms http://scimusing.wordpress.com/2013/10/25/ring-buffers-in-pythonnumpy/

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This one does not require any library. It grows a list and then cycle within by index. I am new to python so I may be wrong, but I guess the footprint is smaller (and it may be faster once the circular buffer is filled because the array never gets shifted). This is good to compute moving averages indeed, but be aware that the items are not kept sorted by age as above.

class CircularBuffer(object):
    def __init__(self, size):
        """initialization"""
        self.index= 0
        self.size= size
        self._data = []

    def record(self, value):
        """append an element"""
        if len(self._data) == self.size:
            self._data[self.index]= value
        else:
            self._data.append(value)
        self.index= (self.index + 1) % self.size

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        """get element by index like a regular array"""
        return(self._data[key])

    def __repr__(self):
        """return string representation"""
        return self._data.__repr__() + ' (' + str(len(self._data))+' items)'

    def get_all(self):
        """return a list of all the elements"""
        return(self._data)
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