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I have a heap with intLevels levels and e elements (both ints) stored in a 2D array of Objects, heapArray, which is intLevels tall and Math.pow(2, intLevels) wide. For hypothetical purposes, let's say I input 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9. The heap will look something like this:

       9
   8       6
 7   3   2   5
1 4

and if you were to print it with a series of java.util.Arrays.toString(Object[] a)s, it would look like this:

[9, null, null, null, null, null, null, null]
[8, 6, null, null, null, null, null, null]
[7, 3, 2, 5, null, null, null, null]
[1, 4, null, null, null, null, null, null]

does anyone have any idea how to take this information and create a JTree out of it? For anyone who doesn't know, a JTree works much like a linked list. You have a root node which you add more nodes to, and you can add additional nodes on those. I know for a fact that if the only heap I was dealing with was this one, I would be able to make the tree this way:

jTree = new javax.swing.JTree();

treeNode1 = new javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode(9);
treeNode2 = new javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode(8);
treeNode3 = new javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode(7);
treeNode4 = new javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode(1);
treeNode3.add(treeNode4);
treeNode4 = new javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode(4);
treeNode3.add(treeNode4);
treeNode2.add(treeNode3);
treeNode3 = new javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode(3);
treeNode2.add(treeNode3);
treeNode1.add(treeNode2);
treeNode2 = new javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode(6);
treeNode3 = new javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode(2);
treeNode2.add(treeNode3);
treeNode3 = new javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode(5);
treeNode2.add(treeNode3);
treeNode1.add(treeNode2);
jTree.setModel(new javax.swing.tree.DefaultTreeModel(treeNode1));

which results in a tree looking like:

9
├8
│├7
││├1
││└4
│└3
└6
 ├2
 └5

Edit


I found implemented the answer's buildTree(List<Object[]>) method:

java.util.List<Object[]> objectArrays = new java.util.ArrayList<Object[]>();
objectArrays.addAll(Arrays.asList(heapArray));
jTree1 = buildTree(objectArrays);

it still doesn't seem to work; the tree remains empty.

Question


Does anyone know a relatively easy yet flexible way to make this 2D array into a JTree with the given information? If implemented correctly, inputting 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 to this tree/heap/array should end up with the same result as the concrete way I showed above.

share|improve this question
    
I think you'll find that my answer below does this. –  Jason Nov 22 '10 at 0:47
    
See my edit. It does not. –  Supuhstar Nov 22 '10 at 2:55
    
Have you tried stepping through the code in debug mode to see where it is going wrong? –  Jason Nov 23 '12 at 1:21
    
You need to post your entire code. The snippet you provided refers to an object called 'heapArray' which is not defined. –  Jason Nov 23 '12 at 1:25
    
@Jason think of it as pseudocode; heapArray is simply a heap that's stored as an array in memory. You don't need to know what's in it or what methods it has as long as you assume it has all the functions of a heap –  Supuhstar Nov 23 '12 at 21:40

1 Answer 1

This class should do the trick. I've used recursion to allow any number of child levels (assuming there are enough object arrays and objects to support the tree).

import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode;
import javax.swing.tree.DefaultTreeModel;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Enumeration;
import java.util.List;

public class TreeBuilder {

    public static void main(final String[] args) {

        // build the list of object arrays
        List<Object[]> objectArrays = new ArrayList<Object[]>();
        Object[] array1 = {9, null, null, null, null, null, null, null};
        Object[] array2 = {8, 6, null, null, null, null, null, null};
        Object[] array3 = {7, 3, 2, 5, null, null, null, null};
        Object[] array4 = {1, 2, null, null, null, null, null, null};
        objectArrays.add(array1);
        objectArrays.add(array2);
        objectArrays.add(array3);
        objectArrays.add(array4);

        // call the method under test
        JTree result = buildTree(objectArrays);

        // print the results
        if(result == null) {
            System.out.println("FAIL: returned null.");
        } else {
            recursePrintTree((DefaultMutableTreeNode)result.getModel().getRoot(), 0);
        }
    }


    public static void recursePrintTree(
            final DefaultMutableTreeNode treeNode,
            final int indentation) {

        // print the indentation spaces
        for(int index = 0; index < indentation; index++) {
            System.out.print("    ");
        }
        // print the value of the node
        System.out.println(treeNode.getUserObject());

        // enumerate the children of the node
        Enumeration enumeration = treeNode.children();
        while(enumeration.hasMoreElements()) {
            DefaultMutableTreeNode child =
                (DefaultMutableTreeNode)enumeration.nextElement();
            recursePrintTree(child, indentation + 1);
        }
    }


    public static JTree buildTree(final List<Object[]> objectArrays) {
        JTree jTree = new JTree();

        DefaultMutableTreeNode node = recurseBuildTree(objectArrays, 0, 0);
        if(node != null) {
            jTree.setModel(new DefaultTreeModel(node));
        }

        return jTree;
    }


    private static DefaultMutableTreeNode recurseBuildTree(
            final List<Object[]> objectArrays,
            final int objectArrayIndex,
            final int itemIndex) {

        DefaultMutableTreeNode node = null;

        if(objectArrayIndex < objectArrays.size()) {
            Object[] objectArray = objectArrays.get(objectArrayIndex);
            if(itemIndex < objectArray.length) {
                Object obj = objectArray[itemIndex];
                if(obj != null) {
                    node = new DefaultMutableTreeNode(obj);

                    DefaultMutableTreeNode childNode = recurseBuildTree(
                        objectArrays, objectArrayIndex + 1, itemIndex * 2);

                    if(childNode != null) {
                        node.add(childNode);
                    }

                    childNode = recurseBuildTree(
                        objectArrays, objectArrayIndex + 1, (itemIndex * 2) + 1);

                    if(childNode != null) {
                        node.add(childNode);
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return node;
    }

}

The results are:

9
    8
        7
            1
            2
        3
    6
        2
        5
share|improve this answer
    
I think I found a better way to do some of that. Posted above. –  Supuhstar Nov 11 '10 at 18:45
    
wait... no, what I posted doesn't work. The JTree stays looking like the default empty JTree. –  Supuhstar Nov 11 '10 at 19:25
    
If you would be so kind as to tell me why I'm not getting a JTree here, I much appreciate it. –  Supuhstar Nov 14 '10 at 20:29
    
Please respond. –  Supuhstar Oct 21 '12 at 19:13
    
You don't need to implement the method - I already did in the answer - you just need to scroll down in the code box. –  Jason Dec 10 '12 at 22:23

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