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A python newbie question: I need to do the following

try:
  do-something()
except error1:
  ...
except error2:
  ...
except:
  ...
#Here I need to do something if any exception of the above exception was thrown.

I can set a flag and do this. But is there a cleaner way of doing this?

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What's unclean about setting a flag? I mean, an if statement is generally considered inoffensive... –  detly Nov 11 '10 at 6:11
1  
+1 for a flag. otherwise you are going to confuse things with an extra level of nesting. Perhaps there is a better way to structure the flow of the code so you don't need to do this at all –  gnibbler Nov 11 '10 at 6:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I just tried a couple different idea's out and it looks like a flag is your best bet.

  • else suite is only called if there is no exception
  • finally will always be called
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2  
probably best set in the else clause. –  aaronasterling Nov 11 '10 at 5:54

From the docs: http://docs.python.org/reference/compound_stmts.html#finally

If finally is present, it specifies a ‘cleanup’ handler. The try clause is executed, including any except and else clauses. If an exception occurs in any of the clauses and is not handled, the exception is temporarily saved. The finally clause is executed. If there is a saved exception, it is re-raised at the end of the finally clause. If the finally clause raises another exception or executes a return or break statement, the saved exception is lost. The exception information is not available to the program during execution of the finally clause.

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4  
The body of a finally clause will execute even if there is no exception. I don't think this is what the OP wants. –  detly Nov 11 '10 at 5:25
    
yes. finally will execute always. I want something like opposite of else. –  amit Nov 11 '10 at 5:48

You can do this with a nested try. The except block of the outer try should catch all exceptions. Its body is another try that immediately re-raises the exception. The except blocks of the inner try actually handle the individual exceptions. You can use the finally block in the inner try to do what you want: run something after any exception, but only after an exception.

Here is a little interactive example (modeled on Applesoft BASIC for nostalgia purposes).

try:
    input("]")  # for Python 3: eval(input("]"))
except:
    try:
       raise
    except SyntaxError:
       print "?SYNTAX",
    except ValueError:
       print "?ILLEGAL QUANTITY",
    # additional handlers here
    except:
       print "?UNKNOWN",
    finally:
       print "ERROR"
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It's not clear if you need to handle differently error1, error2 etc. If not, then the following code will do the trick:

try:
    do_something()
except (error1, error2, error3), exception_variable:
    handle_any_of_these_exceptions()

if you do need to handle different errors differently as well as having the common code, then in the except block, you can have code of the following type:

    if isinstance(exception_variable, error1):
       do_things_specific_to_error1()
share|improve this answer
    
i need to do different things. using isinstance looks like unpythonic, but definitely an option. –  amit Nov 11 '10 at 5:59
    
@amit I generally agree that isinstance is a bad thing but except implicitly uses it by only exceptions based on their type to begin with. I think it's appropriate here. –  aaronasterling Nov 11 '10 at 6:07

This is the best way I can think of. Looks like a code smell though

try:
  exception_flag = True
  do-something()
  exception_flag = False
except error1:
  ...
except error2:
  ...
except:
  ...
finally:
  if exception_flag:
    ...

You wouldn't need the finally if you are not reraising exceptions in the handler

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Actually I don't like flags and consider them as the last resort solution. In this case I'd consider something like this:

def f():
  try:
    do_something()
  except E1:
    handle_E1()
  except E2:
    handle_E2()
  else:
    return
  do_stuff_to_be_done_in_case_any_exception_occurred()

Of course, this is only an option if you can return in the else: case.

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