Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We're trying to figure out validation in the mvvm doing validation in the business logic or model. I've implemented the validate by exception type in our business logic - a simplified diagram can be found here: alt text

If we've got lot's of inputs that are independent of each other, there is no problem, the exception is thrown, the textbox catches it an marks it's borders red for each wrong input. However, when we've got dependent values we're in trouble. e.g.

  • Value1 and Value2 in the model must not be the same, so we've got a validate function in each of those looking for the equals value and throw an exception if that happens

  • now, if we set Value1 to 0 and Value2 to 1 everything is fine

  • Value1 gets set in the GUI to 1 --> this one gets marked red, because the validation of the other values is not triggered, so Value2 in the GUI is not marked faulty

  • Value2 gets set to 2 in the GUI, now we've reached a valid state, but only Value2 gets validated, so Value1 still is marked as faulty

Is there a common pattern to solve that issue? we don't want to introduce a dependency in the GUI between the two textboxes, because this logic should only be present in the business logic layer.

Instead of implementing the validate by exception one could also implement the IDataErrorInfo interface, but the problem still exists, there is no way to force depending values to validate their values again, at least none that i can see :)

Any help is appreciated

cheers, manni


[cleanup, removed unecessary step]


15.11.2010 - Part2

ok, big rethought here, we're going with the businesslogic tier. here is our current planned configuration: alt text ( the image is a bit small scaled here, please open it on a separate window to show it in full size) everything is more or less clear, except how to notify all the viewmodels/model clones of the different editors if the data-model under the business logic gets changed. one way to do it is to track the cloned models in the business logic which creates them. When the data-model is changed using the business logic commit(), all the other registered model clones can be notified of the changes and propagate them further. alternatively the business logic could post an event to which all the viewmodels subscribe so that they get the changes as well - could anyone give me a hint what's better?

Thanks again for the help, sorry i'm so mind-blocked ;)

share|improve this question
    
Why is the VM setting property values in the business layer? This seems to be the root cause of some of your issues. Everyone (it seems) has a slightly different interpretation on what MVVM means, but IMHO the model is a combination of a data model and controller, so it holds a superset of the data in the VM and coordinates access to web services/repositories/etc. So your existing business layer should be either incorporated into the current model, or possibly moved to after the model (i.e. on the other side of a WCF boundary). –  slugster Nov 15 '10 at 8:39
    
we're thinking about collapsing the Model(which is our datamodel) and BusinessLogic into one layer, that is essentially what you mean if i understood it correctly. but still i think that the vm should not contain the validation. But still the string passing problem continues. When moving the business logic to the other side of a wcf boundary, would that imply that all the model is simply a dumb dataholder that can be edited and is submitted as a whole to the business logic and evaluated there? do you have any links regarding the usage of a wcf boundary and the splitup? thanks for the help –  manni Nov 15 '10 at 9:29
    
Absolutely you do validation in the VM, but it is simple validation, like password is longer than 6 chars or email address is valid format. You may want to keep your business logic decoupled from the model, consider using an n-tier approach for the model->business logic->data repository (it is common for the BL and data layer to be incorporated into a web service, but it doesn't have to be if you are just using a local database). Having the BL in the model is still a better option than what you have currently though. –  slugster Nov 15 '10 at 10:05
    
@slugster: you're absolutely right with the simple validation in the vm, i should have made that clearer. i've updated the post above, a pity that there is no possibility to create a thread for discussion here. and thanks very much, i appreciate your patience with me ;) –  manni Nov 15 '10 at 10:33
    
You seem to be concerned about having validation in the VM which is quite a valid concern. The VM is a mediator between your view and model. Why not delegate validation from the view through the view model using IDataErrorInfo, to the model? Put validation in your Model, and call that validation from the VM? Like client side javascript doing an XHR to the server for validation so it is all contained in one place. –  Josh Smeaton Nov 15 '10 at 21:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You could consider using the System.ComponentModel.IDataErrorInfo interface. This very handy interface gives you the ability to:

  • do validation in a MVVM compliant manner
  • do custom validation for any particular field (the validation could check several values if you want it to)
  • bind your UI to the validation errors

You implement IDataErrorInfo on your viewmodel (or even virtually in your view model base, and override it in your derived view models). Due to the nature of databinding, the values i need to check are all there in the view model, and i can test any combination of them. Of course you still have your validation in your business layer, but you no longer need to make a trip to your business layer (or Model) just to effect some validation.

Here is a quick example from a (WPF) screen that gathers some user details and does basic validation on them:

C# code:

    #region IDataErrorInfo Members

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets an error message indicating what is wrong with this object.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value></value>
    /// <returns>An error message indicating what is wrong with this object. The default is an empty string ("").</returns>
    public override string Error
    {
        get
        {
            return this["UserCode"] + this["UserName"] + this["Password"] + this["ConfirmedPassword"] + this["EmailAddress"];
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the <see cref="System.String"/> with the specified column name.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value></value>
    public override string this[string columnName]
    {
        get
        {
            switch (columnName)
            {
                case "UserCode":
                    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(UserCode) && UserCode.Length > 20)
                        return "User Code must be less than or equal to 20 characters";
                    break;

                case "UserName":
                    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(UserCode) && UserCode.Length > 60)
                        return "User Name must be less than or equal to 60 characters";
                    break;

                case "Password":
                    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Password) && Password.Length > 60)
                        return "Password must be less than or equal to 60 characters";
                    break;

                case "ConfirmedPassword":
                    if (Password != ConfirmedPassword)
                        return Properties.Resources.ErrorMessage_Password_ConfirmedPasswordDoesntMatch; 
                    break;

                case "EmailAddress":
                    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(EmailAddress))
                    {
                        var r = new Regex(_emailRegex);
                        if (!r.IsMatch(EmailAddress))
                            return Properties.Resources.ErrorMessage_Email_InvalidEmailFormat;
                    }
                    break;
            }
            return string.Empty;
        }
    }

    #endregion

and here is the XAML markup for two of the textboxes on the page (note particularly the ValidatesOnDataErrors and ValidatesOnExceptions properties in the Text binding):

<TextBox Name="UserCodeTextBox" 
         Text="{Binding UserCode, 
                Mode=TwoWay, 
                UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged, 
                ValidatesOnDataErrors=True, 
                ValidatesOnExceptions=True, 
                NotifyOnSourceUpdated=True, 
                NotifyOnTargetUpdated=True}" 
         GotFocus="Input_GotFocus"
         VerticalAlignment="Top"
         Margin="165,0,150,0"  
         CharacterCasing="Upper"
         />

<TextBox Name="UserNameTextBox" 
         Text="{Binding UserName, 
                Mode=TwoWay, 
                UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged, 
                ValidatesOnDataErrors=True, 
                ValidatesOnExceptions=True, 
                NotifyOnSourceUpdated=True, 
                NotifyOnTargetUpdated=True}" 
         GotFocus="Input_GotFocus"
         VerticalAlignment="Top"
         Margin="165,30,0,0"  
         />
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the detailed answer. it is quite different to the exception approach, because with the IDataErrorInfo interface you essentially - set the value - check if the object is in a valid state this means that inbetween you get an object with an invalid state this is fine if you've got a commit/save button and are working on a clone from the model, but going directly to the model with an invalid state is a bit dangerous –  manni Nov 11 '10 at 9:07
    
@user The data will never hit the view model in this example if validation fails. The binding will first validate, and then reject the data before it binds to the view model. –  Josh Smeaton Nov 11 '10 at 10:59
1  
@josh: since the line this[string] method takes the propertyname and accesses it's own member with that name, that member has to have the new invalid value, otherwise that check can't be made (and would be made to the old value) - or am i missing something here? –  manni Nov 11 '10 at 11:26
1  
I don't like having no many strings in the code, it feels like it will all break at runtime if I every rename a property –  Ian Ringrose Nov 11 '10 at 14:58
    
@Manni, you're right, sorry. But you'd use the validation from the view model to decide if you go any further with the property. @Ian in common mvvm frameworks, a lot of property names are already contained within a string bound to a private member, to raise propertychanged events. You can leverage those names for validation also. Then when a property name changes, you just change the assignment to the private variable and binding + validation continue to work. –  Josh Smeaton Nov 11 '10 at 23:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.