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Is was wondering how to search for try/catch block that does't have log.Error(ex) inside its catch block. By search, I mean using Visual Studio built in regex search.

Regex would find block like this:

try
{
    CallSomeExceptionalFunction();
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    CallSomething();
    // missing error handling
}

This block should be skipped by regex since it contains log.Error:

try
{
    CallSomeExceptionalFunction();
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    log.Error(ex);
}
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1  
You mean you want to use Visual Studio's built-in regex search? Or do you want to do it in a C# program that analyzes source code? Also, can there be more than one pair of braces after a try or catch block? If so, you can't do it with a regex. –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 11 '10 at 9:53
    
Don't be so lazy :) –  Ahmet Kakıcı Nov 11 '10 at 9:59
    
As already stated, if you have arbitrary catch blocks regular expressions cannot really help you. If all your catch blocks are exactly as the one in your example it can be done. But my bet is that you will spend less time and effort by just searching all your code for the “catch” phrase and then manually check if you use your preferred logger. –  Mikael Nov 11 '10 at 10:17
    
Tim Pietzcker: Yes, I want to use Visual Studio built-in regex search –  Ivan Milosavljevic Nov 11 '10 at 10:18
1  
Ahmet Kakıcı: No, I don't want to be lazy, I wan't to be more productive. –  Ivan Milosavljevic Nov 11 '10 at 10:19

2 Answers 2

You cannot parse programming languages based on a context-free grammar with a regular expression.

Just imagine that there was a try-catch block inside your catch block, and another try-catch block in its catch block, and only one of them has the log.Error in it.

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Assuming that you want to do it in code I wouldn't worry about a Regex, I'd just search for the word catch, then count the number of starting braces after that { and subtracting any ending braces } from that count, stopping when I found a line containing log.Error and if the line isn't found before the count reaches zero, then you've got an instance where the log is missing.

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But that would require writing custom search tool? I can`t be done inside Visual Studio built-in search? –  Ivan Milosavljevic Nov 11 '10 at 10:22
    
@Ivan: I misunderstood, I thought that was what you were doing since you had C# as a tag. However, I'd thought you could write a VS macro to do this otherwise (or a VS addin if you want to get advanced) and that way you'd still have it inside VS. –  ho1 Nov 11 '10 at 10:32

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