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Can any one tell the difference between:

NSString* myStr = @"Some value";

and

NSString* myStr = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@""];

why i should alloc a string even i can give some value directly..?

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I've been programming with Cocoa for about 8 years and I have never alloc'd an NSString directly like that. I can't think of any reason for doing it. –  JeremyP Nov 11 '10 at 15:48
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From Apple's String Programming Guide, "Creating Strings"

The simplest way to create a string object in source code is to use the Objective-C @"..." construct:

  NSString *temp = @"/tmp/scratch";

Note that, when creating a string constant in this fashion, you should avoid using anything but 7-bit ASCII characters. Such an object is created at compile time and exists throughout your program’s execution. The compiler makes such object constants unique on a per-module basis, and they’re never deallocated, though you can retain and release them as you do any other object.

The "compiler makes such object constants unique [...]" suggests to me that string literals are interned for each module. As far as I know, interning and object lifetime & memory management are the main differences between the two approaches.

As for why one might use the latter, if for some reason you wanted myStr to not be a unique, interned string, then you might try the -initWithString: approach, though the interned string would still exist, using -copy would be simpler (as NR4TR points out) and (as Yuji notes in the comments) the resulting string will likely be the exact same one as the string literal, despite what Apple's documentation suggests.

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1  
The last paragraph is incorrect. As you can check by yourself, the current implementation of NSString, NSString*foo=[[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"boo"] just returns the same @"boo" as an optimization. This is an implementation detail and you shouldn't rely on it; in particular, you should still release foo. But it doesn't guarantee that foo is different from @"boo" either. –  Yuji Nov 11 '10 at 13:40
    
Apple documentation strikes (out) again. -initWithString: (and +stringWithString) are stated to copy characters from the source (though -initWithString: may return an object that's not the original receiver). Returning the source isn't copying any characters. –  outis Nov 11 '10 at 14:01
    
The docs are right in spirit. It's just that copy is optimised out if you are initialising from a constant string that can't be changed. –  JeremyP Nov 11 '10 at 15:45
    
@Jeremy: they may be right in spirit (I'm not quite ready to concede the point), but they're wrong in the letter, which is terrible for documentation because it makes them misleading. Not copying immutable objects is a fairly standard optimization, but that's not the behavior the docs describe. Docs need to stand up to close reading. –  outis Nov 12 '10 at 0:05
    
"suggests to me that string literals are interned for each module" That is incorrect. The compiler groups string constants at compile time, and inserts the same reference in every place the same constant string are used. This is not unique to Objective-C; C string constants are similarly grouped by all C compilers. There is no "interning" at runtime. –  user102008 Jun 8 '12 at 20:09
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Consider you want to store a a string that gets passed in, exactly the way as it was when passed in:

@implementation AddressCard;

-(NSString *) name
{
   return name;
}

-(void) setName: (NSString *) theName
{
   [name release];
   name = [[NSString alloc] initWthString: theName];
}

//rest of class implementation code snipped
@end

If you would only use

-(void) setName: (NSString *) theName
{
   [name release];
   name = [theName retain];
}

then a NSMutableString that gets passed into as the name could be changed later, without an explicit setting of the name property in AddressCard. This is often not what one wants.

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1  
I'd just use copy instead of retain in the second listing. And no there is no problems –  NR4TR Nov 11 '10 at 11:12
    
As NR4TR says, you should use copy. Also setName: has a bug. if name == theName it's possible that theName gets deallocated by the release. –  JeremyP Nov 11 '10 at 15:51
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Its all about memory management hence if you write

NSString* myStr = @"Some value";

it will assign string value with some resource and at the end of the script memory will be auto release, where as in second case

NSString* myStr = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@""];

you assign some memory and after use of that variable you can release the memory of the variable. Hence you do your self memory management. So chances of memory leak is less in second case. First case solely depends on garbage collection which is not much reliable in case of this language.

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I don't believe that is correct. The chance of a memory leak is greater in the second case, because if the programmer forgets to release myStr, it is a leak - whereas the first can never be a leak. –  makdad Nov 11 '10 at 11:18
1  
In the current implementation of Cocoa, there's no chance of a memory leak in either case. Constant strings are never released and initWithString: just returns the constant string passed in. –  JeremyP Nov 11 '10 at 15:53
    
@phooze: yeah you are write, as I forgot to mention to release the variable in dealloc method in xcode or after the usage if the variable is over. Hence whenever we manually allocate memory its a practice to dealloc(release) the memory of the variable. Sorry for not mentioning this, would take care of this in future. –  Sushil Jaiswar Nov 12 '10 at 4:50
    
@Jeremy, my understanding is that any alloc/init pair will return an object with a retain count of 1 - failing to release that would yield a leak, no? –  makdad Nov 12 '10 at 13:17
1  
@phooze: your understanding is incorrect. alloc returns an object that you own, which you should release. However, init is not under any obligation to return the receiver, and in this case it doesn't, it returns the NSString you passed in as an optimisation. Of course you should still release it, but if you do, it won't leak because constant strings always have a retain count of MAX_INT. –  JeremyP Nov 14 '10 at 9:21
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