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http://jsfiddle.net/bSnaG/

In my mind the above example should look like a grey box with #x not going past the edge and #y poking out the bottom.

But it's not like that - apparently setting overflow-x: hidden; causes overflow-y: scroll | auto;.

Is there any way around this?
I need to allow certain elements to escape the bounding box without setting overflow: visible on #box.

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I can't come up with a solution using the markup you posted, but if you tell us more about what you need we might be able to suggest an alternative? –  roryf Nov 17 '10 at 16:42
    
More detail is needed, what is the exact behavior/context of the items in the box and under which conditions do they get bound or hidden? –  kmiyashiro Nov 18 '10 at 1:08
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

#y can't break out of its bounding box without being taken out of the flow of the document. Does adding position: absolute; to #y give the effect you're after?

Update

Restructured HTML example, including a containing box to allow everything to be easily positioned together. Try it out here: http://jsfiddle.net/GfNbp

<div id="container">
    <div id="box">
        <div id="x"></div>
    </div>
    <div id="y"></div>
</div>


#box {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 10px;
    background: #ededed;
    padding: 10px;

    /* ADD THE OVERFLOW */
    overflow-x: hidden;
    overflow-y: visible;
}

#container{
    position: absolute;
    top: 30px;
    left: 20px;
}

#x {
    width: 150px;
    height: 10px;
    background: #c1ffb2;
}

#y {
    width: 10px;
    height: 150px;
    background: #c4b2ff;
    position: absolute;
    left: 20px; /* margin+padding */
    top: 30px; /* margin+padding+x-height */
}
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As a proof of concept it works, but I still need #y to be relative to #box –  Sam Nov 11 '10 at 11:03
    
Then add position: relative; to the #box –  Allan Kimmer Jensen Nov 11 '10 at 11:43
    
That won't work as it's not taking #y out of context. It has the same effect as not adding position: absolute. Thanks for your answers! –  Sam Nov 17 '10 at 16:33
1  
It sounds like the structure of your HTML is wrong then, and you don't actually want #y to be a child of #box as you don't want it to be bound by it in any way, just positioned next to it. Take it outside of the box (ha ha) and it's a simple case of positioning. –  batwad Nov 17 '10 at 16:45
    
It's kind of strange but just adding position:absolute to #y makes it work on Chrome 7. Since you said it needs to be relative to #box, does #box have any special positioning? As far as I tried, if you leave it on default, it works. –  syockit Nov 17 '10 at 17:20
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Here's what I have, and it works:

#box {
    position:absolute;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 10px;
    background: #ededed;
    padding: 10px;

    /* ADD THE OVERFLOW */
    overflow-y:visible;
    overflow-x:hidden;

}

#x {
    width: 150px;
    height: 10px;
    background: #c1ffb2;
}


#y {
    width: 10px;
    height: 150px;
    background: #c4b2ff;
    position: fixed;
}
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Doesn't look like you need to position #box absolutely either. –  Plan B Nov 17 '10 at 16:43
    
That will only work as long as the page itself doesn't scroll. Try adding body { height: 1000px; } to the example. –  roryf Nov 17 '10 at 16:45
    
Have you tried using a different methodology? Perhaps using a vertically-tiled graphic in an offset div layered above the #box div or something along those lines? –  Plan B Nov 17 '10 at 16:48
    
position: fixed; makes the block relative to viewport; not what OP wants. –  syockit Nov 17 '10 at 17:09
    
yes, thank you for clearing that up –  Plan B Nov 17 '10 at 17:52
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I think the problem is your height: 100px in the outer div. If you remove this height attribute, do you get the result you're looking for?

Otherwise, I think batwad's probably knocked the nail on the head using three divs.

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