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public class Generator {
private static final Map<byte[], byte[]> cache = new HashMap<byte[], byte[]>();

public static byte[] generate(byte[] src) {
    byte[] generated = cache.get(src);
    if (generated == null) {
        synchronized (cache) {
            generated = cache.get(src);
            if (generated == null) {
                generated = doGenerate(src);
                cache.put(src, generated);
            }
        }
    }
    return generated;
}

private static byte[] doGenerate(byte[] src) {...}

}

Can anybody answer, what's wrong in this code? Maybe generate() method can return partially constructed array, isn't it?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For a start, you are using the HashMap unsynchronised. This can lead to, say, infinite loops (this is real - it has been observed in production environments).

It also suffers from the general double-checked locking bug of not having a happens-before relationship from writing the contents of the array to reading from it (I am assuming there will be some data).

(Note, you are comparing object identities here, not array contents.)

Another problem is that you have mutable statics, which is poor design that causes serious problems.

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But in HashMap I use only get() method whitout synchronize. Can I get incorrect data from HashMap?(put() placing in synchronized block and any changes must fetch in a main memmory when synchronized block is finished) –  artem Nov 11 '10 at 11:51
1  
@artem, if the put() changes the map's internal structures while the get() is using those, the get() can fail like Tom described. (all use of the map must be synchronised.) –  rsp Nov 11 '10 at 11:54
    
Could you tell me more, what can go wrong. I can't understand this. I think at the worst case HashMap return null... –  artem Nov 11 '10 at 12:03
    
I don't think this example suffers from the "general" double-checking bug, as synchronize establishes a happens-before relationship (according to this: java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/memory.html) –  Cephalopod Nov 11 '10 at 12:15
1  
@Arian - The fast case doesn't enter the synchronized block. Therefore, no happens-before. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 11 '10 at 15:13

Replace your HashMap with ConcurrentHashMap.

Your synchronization looks not useful. I would rewrite the whole thing in this way:

private static final Map<byte[], byte[]> cache = new ConcurrentHashMap<byte[], byte[]>();

public static byte[] generate(byte[] src, int counter) {
    byte[] generated = cache.get(src);
    if (generated == null) {
        generated = doGenerate(src);
        cache.put(src, generated);
    }        
    return generated;
}

Edit: The try/catch was bizarre and not necessary. For the OP's purposes, it suffices to use a ConcurrentHashMap. If the OP really doesn't want to suffer the costs of calling doGenerate twice for the same dataset, then they will have to continue with the DCL pattern, but use of a ConcurrentHashMap is still recommended.

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In that particular code, it's not the potential overhead of generating the value which is the main concern. You may end up getting different values for the same key. (putIfAbsent is helpful here. Certainly don't use broken double-checked locking.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 2 '10 at 17:37

While one thread is executing line 11, another thread may be executing line 5. This is why you need a synchronized map here, and why when using an unsynchronized HashMap your results will be indeterminate.

The solution here is a synchronized Map (see java.util.Collections#synchronizedMap). Of course, if you use a wholly synchronized map then your double-checked locking (extra optimization) becomes redundant.

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Could you please tell me more in details what can go wrong. I think in a worst case generate() can return null... or it can return partially constructed array or array with inconsistent date, isn't it? –  artem Nov 11 '10 at 12:39
    
The side effects are implementation specific - the contract is what's important here, and that contract requires that where many threads access a HashMap, and at least one thread changes the content, the access MUST be synchronized. A ConcurrentModificationException would be perfectly a perfectly valid result. From the API docs: "If multiple threads access a hash map concurrently, and at least one of the threads modifies the map structurally, it must be synchronized externally." –  joelittlejohn Nov 12 '10 at 16:45

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