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I have to store millions of URLs in a database, and be able to find rows by URL quickly.

MySQL's string indexes aren't quick enough for this, because they only index the first 4 characters of the string, which are generally www., and then MySQL iterates over each of those rows starting with www. and compares the value with the URL I searched for.

MongoDB doesn't let you customize how many characters are indexed for strings, and the docs aren't very detailed, so I don't think MongoDB is suitable.

Google App Engine has a special URL type, which is great, but I can't use GAE.

Any suggestions?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

MySQL's string indexes aren't quick enough for this, because they only index the first 4 characters of the string, which are generally www., and then MySQL iterates over each of those rows starting with www. and compares the value with the URL I searched for.

This is not true. MySQL can index up to 1000 bytes for MyISAM and 767 bytes for InnoDB.

If you only need literal matches for your URL strings, index their hashes.

This will keep your index size low (16 byte per key if you use something like MD5) and the key values will be distributed evenly.

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I'll test this. Thanks. –  Amy B Nov 11 '10 at 14:00

If you use MySQL, read pages 103-104 of High Performance MySQL (2nd ed.) (link allows you to search inside book - look for "pseudohash"), which covers hashing approach for indexing URLs. Most importantly, it suggests using MySQL's CRC32 function instead of MD5 for better performance because it produces a shorter value that can be compared more rapidly.

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How would crc32 give better selectivity? Performance, maybe, but selectivity??? –  Seun Osewa Nov 11 '10 at 20:36
    
You're correct, answer edited. –  orangepips Nov 11 '10 at 21:40

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