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Can anybody tell what is the module/method used to get current time?

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6  
>>> import datetime >>> current_time = datetime.datetime.now().time() >>> current_time.isoformat() '11:23:19.200283' -> datetime python 2.7.5 docs –  Moreno Aug 8 '13 at 14:25

12 Answers 12

up vote 495 down vote accepted
>>> import datetime
>>> datetime.datetime.now()
datetime(2009, 1, 6, 15, 8, 24, 78915)

And just the time:

>>> datetime.datetime.time(datetime.datetime.now())
datetime.time(15, 8, 24, 78915)

The same but slightly more compact:

>>> datetime.datetime.now().time()

See the documentation for more info.

To save typing, you can import the datetime object from the datetime module:

>>> from datetime import datetime

Then remove the leading datetime. from all the above.

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how to extract only the time? –  user46646 Jan 6 '09 at 6:28
    
Added to the answer –  Harley Holcombe Jan 6 '09 at 7:05
    
how could i compare it as in: a = datetime.time(datetime.now()) if a < 2: print 'done' –  user46646 Jan 6 '09 at 7:48
9  
upvote for tolerating newbies! like me! –  ehfeng Oct 10 '10 at 3:02
5  
Added link to doco (bad Harley!). –  Harley Holcombe Jul 7 '11 at 0:21

You can use time.strftime():

>>> from time import gmtime, strftime
>>> strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", gmtime())
'2009-01-05 22:14:39'
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44  
To get your local time, and not GMT time, simply remove gmttime from the above example. –  Dennis Dec 21 '12 at 2:07
5  
The %X directive represents the current time in 24-hour clock time notation. You can use %I:%M:%S for 12-hour clock time notation. –  Honest Abe Feb 20 '13 at 21:36
    
I got an error that says "TypeError: 'str' object is not callable" –  Xiam May 24 '13 at 13:30
1  
how can i get which timezone is being used? –  sunglim Dec 28 '13 at 18:30
1  
@sunglim: gmtime() returns time in UTC. If you omit it; time.strftime() uses your local timezone. You could change your local timezone on Unix using os.environ['TZ'] = ':America/Sao_Paulo'; time.tzset(), see tzset() docs or (better) use pytz. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 30 at 2:25

Similar to Harley's answer, but use the str() function for a quick-n-dirty, slightly more human readable format:

>>> from datetime import datetime
>>> str(datetime.now())
'2011-05-03 17:45:35.177000'
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8  
+ 1 for easy, already known way to manipulate. Use the types we know that are powerful in Python! –  Cosine Jun 8 '13 at 18:50
1  
I like this one because it gives me mySQL format. –  atmelino Feb 22 at 0:04
>>> from datetime import datetime
>>> datetime.now().strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S')

For this example, the output will be like this: '2013-09-18 11:16:32'

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1  
This is the most useful answer for most applications because it allows you to format the date or time however you like. It would be helpful if you included an example of what the output looks like. –  cxrodgers Sep 17 '13 at 19:18
    
@cxrodgers The output will be like this -- Output -- '2013-09-18 11:16:32' –  ParaMeterz Sep 18 '13 at 5:49
>>> from time import gmtime, strftime
>>> strftime("%a, %d %b %Y %X +0000", gmtime())
'Tue, 06 Jan 2009 04:54:56 +0000'

That outputs the current GMT in the specified format. There is also a localtime() method.

This page has more details.

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I must not fully understand this as doing "print strftime("%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S +0000", gmtime())" will lead to the same number being printed twice, irregardless to the actual time. What is going on? –  James McMahon Feb 10 '09 at 17:10
1  
+1. this is useful for generating http header: Last-Modified ( need to change +0000 to GMT). –  Brian Mar 12 '13 at 10:08

Do

from time import time

t = time()

t - float number, good for time interval measurement

there is some difference for Unix and Windows platforms.

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4  
use time.clock() on Windows and time.time() on *nix –  Corey Goldberg Jan 6 '09 at 20:23
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this is the time I was looking for! :) –  Sam Watkins Aug 8 '12 at 5:01
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I'd like to note that Corey's comment is only appropriate in regard to interval measurement. time.clock() has absolutely nothing to do with retrieving the current time. –  Honest Abe Feb 19 '13 at 21:17
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@CoreyGoldberg As of 3.3, time.clock() is deprecated (I know it wasn't when you posted your comment 5 years ago but I thought I'd add it now for good measure). –  M A Jan 3 at 18:00

If you need current time as a time object:

>>> import datetime
>>> now = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> datetime.time(now.hour, now.minute, now.second)
datetime.time(11, 23, 44)
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2  
Updated this answer to only evaluate the now() function once... –  Rob I Nov 23 '11 at 19:45

All good suggestions, but I find it easiest to use ctime() myself:

In [2]: from time import ctime
In [3]: ctime()
Out[3]: 'Thu Oct 31 11:40:53 2013'

This gives a nicely formatted string representation of current local time.

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I'll contribute to this because .isoformat() is in the documentation but not yet here (this is mighty similar to @Ray Vega's answer):

>>>import datetime
>>> datetime.datetime.now().isoformat()
'2013-06-24T20:35:55.982000'
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Quickest way is

>>> import time
>>> time.strftime("%Y%m%d")
'20130924'
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>>> import datetime, time
>>> time = strftime("%H:%M:%S:%MS", time.localtime())
>>> print time
'00:20:58:20S'
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Yet another answer, but maybe simpler :)

from datetime import datetime as time
time.now()

output Example:
2014-04-23 14:52:05.390800

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1  
This is really the same as Ray Vega's answer but it's not simpler, and the output is wrong. The output for this is still in datetime format: datetime.datetime(2014, 5, 20, 11, 5, 32, 205538) –  Dannid May 20 at 18:06
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when you do 'from datetime import datetime as time', you are shadowing the real 'time' module from the standard library, so it will not be useable elsewhere in your code if you need it (unless you import it as another name). so no, don't import it as 'time'... that's just bad practice.. –  Corey Goldberg Aug 25 at 7:59

protected by casperOne Apr 26 '12 at 12:03

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