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I have a family of classes which i feel needs some encapsulation over the creation methods. Take for example:

public abstract class File
{   
    protected File(string fileName)
    {
        Name = fileName;
    }
    string Name {get; set;}
}

public class ImageFile : File
{
    protected ImageFile(string fileName, int width, int Height) :base(fileName)
    {
        Height = height;
        Width = width;  
    }

    int Height {get; set;}
    int Width {get; set;}
}

public class WordFile : File
{
    protected WordFile(string fileName, int wordCount) :base(fileName)
    {
        WordCount = wordCount;
    }

   int WordCount {get; set;}
}

Given this class hierarchy, what is the best method for me to encapsulate the creation method of each distinct classes? It would be helpful if you can provide some examples of using a factory class?

Many Thanks

Edit

One idea i had i mind was a Factory method in the abstract class which returns the concrete class. e.g

public abstract class File
    {   
        protected File(string fileName)  
        {
         ....
        } 

        string Name {get; set;}
        public static File Create(string fileName) 
        {
            if(filename.Contains("jpg")
            {
               return new ImageFile(...);
            }
            .... 
        }
    }

But in this example im not sure how i can pass the unqiue parameters for each of the concrete types. i.e Width, Height, WordCount...

share|improve this question
1  
Factories come at a cost, so you should only use them if they are going to add value. What problem do you expect them to solve in your example? What sort of code construct do you want to allow? File.Create(...), returning one of your subclasses? If so, how is that going to be implemented? How will the factory know which class to instantiate? –  Kirk Woll Nov 11 '10 at 15:33
    
Edited my question to elaborate a little. The idea is to pass the fileName and the factory will "figure" what the concrete type is based on the file extension. But I'm stuck on how to deal with the concrete type parameters. –  Fixer Nov 11 '10 at 15:52
    
This is probably off-topic, but you should probably use Path.GetExtension(fileName).toUpperInvariant() == ".JPG" instead of just using fileName.Contains. This will allow mixed cases like "file.JpG", or non-extension use like "listofjpgfiles.txt". –  MiffTheFox Nov 11 '10 at 16:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about creating a different factory for each of these file types? Your File.Create(...) method can choose which one to invoke, and then each factory would be responsible for reading a particular type of file, creating the data necessary to generate the File object you want to have, and returning it.

public static File Create(string fileName)
{
    var factory = GetFactory(fileName);
    return factory.CreateFile(fileName);
}

public static IFileFactory GetFactory(string fileName)
{
    if(Path.GetExtension(fileName).toUpperInvariant() == ".JPG")
    {
        return new ImageFileFactory();
    }
    //...
}

public interface IFileFactory
{
    File CreateFile(string fileName);
}
public class ImageFileFactory : IFileFactory
{
    public File CreateFile(string fileName)
    {
        int width = GetWidth(fileName);
        int height = GetHeight(fileName);
        return new ImageFile(fileName, width, height);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting! Is this also know as the abstract factory pattern? –  Fixer Nov 11 '10 at 16:27
    
Bump, but would be better served with a FileData DTO for the constructor methinks. –  annakata Nov 11 '10 at 16:33
    
@Fixer: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abstract_factory_pattern –  annakata Nov 11 '10 at 16:34
    
@Fixer: I don't know what it's called. It's just a pattern that makes sense for me with what you're trying to do. It maintains separation of concerns better, as each class is really only concerned with performing one action, rather than making the File class responsible for knowing how to generate every possible type of file. It's very flexible, too. You could even make your FileFactory implementations more like "plugins", where you or third parties could add new supported file types simply by providing a new factory implementation that registers itself with your software. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 11 '10 at 16:37

You've got a couple of options, I think:

  1. Define some sort of object (such as a Dictionary) that contains the parameters that each different instance should have. The code which calls the factory method will be responsible for constructing the Dictionary correctly (you should probably make sure the keys are constants defined in each of the sub-classes) and passing it in. The constructor for each of the sub-classes will be responsible for validating the object and ensuring that everything they need is present. If it isn't, they should throw an exception providing reasonable information.

  2. If the parameters aren't directly needed for object construction, you could add them as properties. The calling code would be responsible for setting these properties, and the subclasses would need to validate the properties have been set when they need the properties. If they haven't, then again they should throw an exception providing reasonable information.

The biggest thing you're going to lose here is compile-time error checking of these parameters - if the calling code isn't providing, for instance, the word count parameter for the WordFile class, there won't be a compiler error.

share|improve this answer

It looks like you are trying to create objects of classes which have different parameters to their constructors. The Factory pattern does not help you solve that. It does help solve the fact that depending on the filename it will create an appropriate object. To pass them different parameters, you will have to do that once the objects are created.

One solution could be to have a list or array of arguments to be passed and your factory could determine the type of object to create and then use the parameter list or array to create the desired object. For example

List<int> param = new List<int>();
param.Add(200);   //So add as many parameters as you want
//The factory will simply pass those to the objects it is creating
//And then pass this pass this param to your File.Create() method
File.Create(param);

The only benefit here of using a factory here is that your code will be independent of the specific implementations of the various File Type classes that you implementing. Otherwise, I would suggest not use to use this pattern and simply create your objects directly as you already know what to create.

share|improve this answer
    
I wondered about that but then i think there are benefits of using a factory because i am encapsulating the instantiating. Say i had several hundred files to process, i certainly would want to avoid doing the file extension checks in the client code and instead let the factory handle it, if possible... –  Fixer Nov 11 '10 at 16:24

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