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I have a dictionary A, and a possible entry foo. I know that A[foo] should be equal to x, but I don't know if A[foo] has been already defined. In any case if A[foo] has been defined it means that it already has the correct value.

It is faster to execute:

if foo not in A.keys(): 
   A[foo]=x 

or simply update

A[foo]=x 

because by the time the computer has found the foo entry, it can as well update it. While if not I would have to call the hash table two times?

Thanks.

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1  
How can you even have this problem? Normally you'd know which keys you've set before or simply build the final dict in one go. –  Jochen Ritzel Nov 11 '10 at 16:06
    
I am calculating all the elements (and relations) in an Algebra. And I have to use what I know to find out the ones I don't know. Some calculations are harder, so I keep them for last. Hoping that by the time I go to calculate them, I can use the others to derive them for free. So soon I don't know anymore which relations I have already discovered and which I didn't. Since the elements are many, and the relations too, I need to be fast. –  Pietro Speroni Nov 11 '10 at 16:13
    
From the description of the problem, it seems as if dictionary storage will not be the major bottle-neck in your program. Just write the clearest program you can write and if it's too slow, profile it and optimize where needed. In my experience, I almost never get to to profile and optimize step. –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 11 '10 at 16:48
    
When you used timeit what did you learn? Please post the results. –  S.Lott Nov 11 '10 at 17:51
    
@S.Lott I just posted an answer using timeit. –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 11 '10 at 19:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just add items to the dictionary without checking for their existence. I added 100,000 items to a dictionary using 3 different methods and timed it with the timeit module.

  1. if k not in d: d[k] = v
  2. d.setdefault(k, v)
  3. d[k] = v

Option 3 was the fastest, but not by much.

[ Actually, I also tried if k not in d.keys(): d[k] = v, but that was slower by a factor of 300 (each iteration built a list of keys and performed a linear search). It made my tests so slow that I left it out here. ]

Here's my code:

import timeit

setup = """
import random
random.seed(0)
item_count = 100000
# divide key range by 5 to ensure lots of duplicates 
items = [(random.randint(0, item_count/5), 0) for i in xrange(item_count)]
"""
in_dict = """
d = {}
for k, v in items:
    if k not in d:
        d[k] = v
"""
set_default = """
d = {}
for k, v in items:
    d.setdefault(k, v)
"""
straight_add = """
d = {}
for k, v in items:
    d[k] = v
"""
print 'in_dict      ', timeit.Timer(in_dict, setup).timeit(1000)
print 'set_default  ', timeit.Timer(set_default, setup).timeit(1000)
print 'straight_add ', timeit.Timer(straight_add, setup).timeit(1000)

And the results:

in_dict       13.090878085
set_default   21.1309413091
straight_add  11.4781760635

Note: This is all pretty pointless. We get many questions daily about what's the fastest way to do x or y in Python. In most cases, it is clear that the question was being asked before any performance issues were encountered. My advice? Focus on writing the clearest program you can write and if it's too slow, profile it and optimize where needed. In my experience, I almost never get to to profile and optimize step. From the description of the problem, it seems as if dictionary storage will not be the major bottle-neck in your program.

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1  
Thanks for testing it out. Now WE know. Yes, of course if I was "just" interested in speed for this one program I should have gone for profiling. But I am not. I don't know you, but to me I am often in the situation where I need to decide if re-writing a dict entry or checking before. It's a matter of mental cleanliness to just know which one is better. And two orders of magnitude are a lot! –  Pietro Speroni Nov 11 '10 at 20:54
    
Nice note.. helpful –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 17 at 7:46
if foo not in A.keys(): 
    A[foo] = x 

is very slow, because A.keys() creates a list, which has to be parsed in O(N).

if foo not in A: 
    A[foo] = x 

is faster, because it takes O(1) to check, whether foo exists in A.

A[foo] = x 

is even better, because you already have the object x and you just add (if it already does not exist) a pointer to it to A.

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Am I wrong :-/ ? I think the question was how to set an item to dict if it is not there already... –  khachik Nov 11 '10 at 16:11
2  
His question is written a little weird, but he is saying that 'if the value already is set, it was set correctly', so yeah, overwriting with the exact same value is fine in this case. –  Thomas Vander Stichele Nov 11 '10 at 16:13
    
Hi Thomas, sorry, if I word it funny. Feel free to edit-correct it. But it seem to me that you got exactly what I meant :-) –  Pietro Speroni Nov 11 '10 at 16:17

There are certainly faster ways than your first example. But I suspect the straight update will be faster than any test.

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foo not in A.keys()

will, in Python 2, create a new list with the keys and then perform linear search on it. This is guaranteed to be slower (although I mainly object to it because there are alternatives that are faster and more elegant/idiomatic).

A[foo] = x

and

if foo not in A:
    A[foo] = x

are different if A[foo] already exists but is not x. But since your "know" A[foo] will be x, it doesn't matter semantically. Anyway, both will be fine performance-wise (hard to tell without benchmarking, although intuitively I'd say the if takes much more time than copying a pointer).

So the answer is clear anyway: Choose the one that is much shorter code-wise and just as clear (the first one).

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A.setdefault(foo, x) but i'm not sure it is faster then if not A.has_key(foo): A[foo] = x. Should be tested.

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I was thinking about setdefault as well, but I doubt it's faster than A[foo] = x –  Douglas Leeder Nov 11 '10 at 16:09
    
It is not faster, but A[foo]=x doesn't do what the original author wants. According to the snippet foo:x is added when and only when the dict doesn't have a key foo. –  khachik Nov 11 '10 at 16:13
    
Thanks khachik, the op (me) just need to make sure that by the end A[foo]=x. If it was already defined and a[foo] was already equal to x I am ok to reassign it if it's faster. –  Pietro Speroni Nov 11 '10 at 16:16
1  
@Pietro to make sure: I just tested, A[foo]=x is faster (1/1.5) then A.setdefault(foo, x). So you can just reassign, if the old value can be overridden. –  khachik Nov 11 '10 at 16:24
    
Thanks khachik. I'll do that –  Pietro Speroni Nov 11 '10 at 16:54

If you "know" that A[foo] "should be" equal to x, then I would just do:

assert(A[foo]==x)

which will tell you if your assumption is wrong!

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Although this will fail with a KeyError if foo not in A. But indeed, if the programs starts giving wrong results, use an if foo in A: assert A[foo] == x. –  delnan Nov 11 '10 at 16:18
    
Thanks, this would not work. foo might be not defined without this being an error at all. Only if it is defined, I know it is equal to x. If I check, I might make more robust code (and in fact I do have those asserts for now) but slower. Eventually the code must work without those asserts. –  Pietro Speroni Nov 11 '10 at 16:24

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