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I have had this happen to me often. I am working on a master branch and I need to test a plugin, so I create a new branch and check it out. I download the plugin into the project directory and test it out. Then I switch back to the master branch and delete the branch I had created.

What ends up happening is the files of the plugin remain in the project directory. I'm wondering if this is normal behavior. What do I have to do in order to have a seamless switch between branches?

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@ipsum: Answer? –  Mark Peters Nov 11 '10 at 16:33
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git will not remove untracked files from your working copy, so unless you added the files of the plugin and created a commit on the new branch git will not do anything to your plugin files –  knittl Nov 11 '10 at 16:40
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@knittl: that is the answer. Might as well post it. (Along with a mention of git clean, perhaps.) –  Jefromi Nov 11 '10 at 16:47
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up vote 7 down vote accepted

git will not remove untracked files from your working copy, so unless you added the files of the plugin and created a commit on the new branch git will not do anything to your plugin files.

if you want to remove untracked file from your working tree, use git clean – be careful, it will remove any untracked file from disk and there's no way to recover from that (without using undelete software)

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The potential danger of git clean, of course, is why it won't even do anything unless you pass it the -f option. (Possibly helpful for this case - you can use it on specific paths.) –  Jefromi Nov 11 '10 at 20:00
    
why "git will not remove untracked files from your working copy"? will my next git add add those untracked files from different branch? –  joetsuihk Oct 29 '11 at 16:51
    
@joetsuihk: untracked files in the working directory do not belong to any branch, they belong to the working directory. if you git add untracked files, they will be included in the next commit –  knittl Oct 30 '11 at 13:06
    
@knittl git add . do not add those files from my experience, not even listed as "untracked", why? But it has a potential to mess up different branches files if branches contains different files? –  joetsuihk Nov 1 '11 at 15:21
    
@joetsuihk: I don't understand what you are trying to say … git add . will add all files contained in the current directory and all it's subdirectories, unless they match a rule from a .gitignore file. And it will never mess up branches. Branches are only pointers to a commit object – which in turn points to it's ancestor commit(s) – and those commit objects are set in stone and not touched by git (except for rebase, filter-branch and commit --amend). Maybe we should move this discussion to Stack Overflow Chat? –  knittl Nov 1 '11 at 15:41
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try checkout -f

see git --help checkout:

Proceed even if the index or the working tree differs from HEAD. This is used to throw away local changes.

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I don't think this is what the OP's experiencing. The checkout proceeds, but leaves some files there. –  Jefromi Nov 11 '10 at 16:47
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