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Consider the following code:

public class Outer<T>  {

    public class Inner{
    }

    public static <T> Outer<T>.Inner get(){
        Object o = new Object();
        return (Outer<T>.Inner)o;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Outer.<String>get();
    }
}

This code compiles successfully in Eclipse, but fails to compile in javac:

Outer.java:10: ')' expected
        return (Outer<T>.Inner)o;
                        ^
Outer.java:10: ';' expected
        return (Outer<T>.Inner)o;
                         ^
Outer.java:10: illegal start of expression
        return (Outer<T>.Inner)o;
                              ^
3 errors

Is this a bug in javac or Eclipse?

If I change the cast to (Outer.Inner)o it compiles, although there is a warning:

Eclipse:

Outer.Inner is a raw type. References to generic type Outer<T>.Inner should be parameterized

javac:

Outer.java:10: warning: [unchecked] unchecked conversion
found   : Outer.Inner
required: Outer<T>.Inner
        return (Outer.Inner)o;
               ^
1 warning

Javac version: 1.6.0_21

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What's the warning? –  Buhake Sindi Nov 11 '10 at 16:34
    
added to question –  dogbane Nov 11 '10 at 16:37
    
wow! i too tried this. Eclipse is okay with 1st code but javac is not +1 for telling me something new. –  Rakesh Juyal Nov 11 '10 at 16:45
2  
I don't have an answer for you. I would suggest you search for a bug like this on the Eclipse database and if you can't find it, post it. The Eclipse folks are usually better at quickly deciding whether it's a bug or not. If they determine it's a javac bug, post it to Oracle. It could be neither, in which case it's probably a spec bug (ambiguity). –  Mark Peters Nov 11 '10 at 16:52
    
I agree with Mark. It looks like a compiler bug to me; you could also check out the Java Language Specification and see if you can match your syntax to a valid production. –  erickson Nov 11 '10 at 16:57
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8 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have found that this is a bug in the javac compiler that has since been fixed. JDK 7b100 compiles this fine.

See http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6665356

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The most amusing thing is that, unless there is something that I miss about Java generics, both

return (Outer<T>.Inner) o;

And

return (Outer.Inner) o;

Both compile to the same bytecode.

The problem for the first line happens at parsing - meaning that javac and Eclipse do not use the same parser for Java source code. You should ask a question about what differences there are between Eclipse JDT's java parser and javac's. (Or post a bug at Eclipse).

If you insist on keeping that behaviour (I would suggest refactoring Inner to a static inner class), you could use @SuppressWarning with a field assignation (in order to restrict the @SuppressWarning to the smallest scope possible).

@SuppressWarnings({"rawtypes","unchecked"})
Outer<T>.Inner casted = (Outer.Inner)o;
return casted;

EDIT: OK, I believe I got it - Eclipse's JDT parses the Java code before passing it to the compiler - and their parser can make sense of such a cast, while (at least your and my version of) javac's cannot. (And after that, Eclipse directly passes the parsed code to compilation). Before filing a bug, look at how the last version of Java 6 behaves.

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The bytecode is the same because of "type erasure" in which all information about generics is removed at compile time. –  dogbane Nov 11 '10 at 17:37
    
Edited that answer, I am currently downloading Sun's latest JDK version to see what happens. –  Jean Hominal Nov 11 '10 at 17:52
    
so you're telling me you've never compiled with a Sun JDK yet? –  Buhake Sindi Nov 11 '10 at 18:18
1  
@The Elite Gentleman: I'm usually using openJDK on my computer, which has worked well enough for my uses, however it is currently at version 6.20 while Sun's is at 6u22. –  Jean Hominal Nov 11 '10 at 18:20
    
my javac version: 1.6.0_21. –  dogbane Nov 11 '10 at 18:30
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Sadly, if you're casting from an Object, then you can't dodge the unchecked cast warning. That's because Object doesn't have enough type information by itself to have the T.

(Java generics are erasure-based. Therefore there is no way to know whether an object has type argument T at runtime---type arguments are used at compile-time only.)

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1  
It's not the unchecked cast warning that's a problem. Javac will actually fail to compile due to the errors he's listed. In eclipse the warning is given because it compiles successfully. –  Mark Peters Nov 11 '10 at 16:49
1  
@Mark: Actually, if I read the question correctly, the OP could get it to compile successfully using Outer.Inner in javac. And that's the best you can do, in this instance. Should Outer<T>.Inner ever be allowed? That's the part I'm not sure about. –  Chris Jester-Young Nov 11 '10 at 16:55
    
I agree, and I didn't downvote you because it's a perfectly valid observation. Should Outer<T>.Inner be allowed? I don't see why not. The compiler allows all other kinds of unchecked casts (like casting an Object to a List<String> for example), so I don't see why this is critically different. –  Mark Peters Nov 11 '10 at 17:03
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You cannot cast an Object to something that it's not.

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2  
If you have an Object reference, it can be casted to literally any reference type as far as the compiler is concerned. Inspection would tell you this would throw a runtime error sure, but that's not what the compiler is complaining about. –  Mark Peters Nov 11 '10 at 16:42
    
Heh, I removed that part before you answered. Sure, the compiler may not care, but the VM will. Also, he's using <T> as both as a class generic and a method generic. Wouldn't the method generic win? –  Jeremy Heiler Nov 11 '10 at 16:46
1  
the class parameter is ignored completely for static methods. Parameterization of a class only applies to references to instances. –  Mark Peters Nov 11 '10 at 16:48
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There are two problems in you code:

First is at compile time: you cannot safely cast an object to a generic type as generics are not reified in Java. Casting to a non-instantiated generic is clearly to dangerous for your javac. I fear the compiler response to this depends on the compiler vendor and version.

Second, casting an Object, of type Object, to any other type will throw a ClassCastException at runtime as in Java the type information is contained in the object and won't change after creation.

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I don't care about what will happen at runtime, because this is a simplified example. I only care about why javac is failing to compile my code. –  dogbane Nov 11 '10 at 17:04
    
Then you should give your javac version because I already did similar casts and only got the 'unchecked' warning, though I can't check the javac version right now. –  Guillaume Nov 11 '10 at 17:13
    
javac version: 1.6.0_21 –  dogbane Nov 11 '10 at 18:30
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The following "fix" worked when I compiled with javac. It also successfully compiled in Eclipse. The problem I perceive is that you can't create a new Object from a variable (like what you did in your case). I don't know how to explain it or validate my theory.

/**
 * 
 */
package testcases;

/**
 * @author The Elite Gentleman
 *
 */
public class Outer<T> {

    public class Inner{
    }

    public static <T> Outer<T>.Inner get(){
        //Object o = new Object();
        //return (Outer<T>.Inner)o;
        return new Outer<T>().new Inner();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Outer.<String>get();
    }
}

Basically, since Inner is not a static nested class, in order to instantiate it, this is how you would do it:

new Outer<T>().new Inner();

Also, Object o = new Object(); doesn't guarantee that the object o is actually an instance of type Inner class.


Update My solution helped with Object instantiation and not for object casting of existing instantiated object. For that, I don't have answers to (but we're developers, we'll figure something out :-) ).

What I can think of is why not make Inner class static nested class?

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1  
I'm not sure it's a "fix" if it's functionally completely different. This is creating a new instance, the OP was casting an existing object. –  Mark Peters Nov 11 '10 at 16:51
    
+1 for noticing it's not a static nested class –  Brad Cupit Nov 11 '10 at 16:53
    
@Mark Peters, true, but for this example, essentially, Object o = new Object(); doesn't guarantee that the object o is of type Inner as well, hence my "fix". –  Buhake Sindi Nov 11 '10 at 16:54
2  
@The Elite: Try doing Object o = new Outer<T>().new Inner(); return (Outer<T>.Inner)o; and I'm guessing you're back to the same problem. This isn't a question of instantiation, it's a question of casting. –  Mark Peters Nov 11 '10 at 16:55
    
@mark is right. It's about casting. This is a somewhat simplified example. In the real case, I have an existing object which I am trying to cast. –  dogbane Nov 11 '10 at 16:59
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if you must use a cast, you can suppress the warning with @SuppressWarnings

   Object o = new Object();

   @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
   Outer<T>.Inner returnVal = (Outer.Inner) o;

   return returnVal;

But realize the warning exists because you're doing something unsafe. Object can't be cast to String. This will result in an exception at runtime.

And as The Elite Gentleman noticed, you may want to mark Inner as static:

public static class Inner {
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2  
Suppressing a warning won't evade the compile error. –  Mark Peters Nov 11 '10 at 17:04
    
@Mark he said "If I change the cast ... it compiles, although there is a warning" –  Brad Cupit Nov 11 '10 at 17:15
1  
@Mark but you do bring up a good point, I should have taken the <T> off. Fixed now. –  Brad Cupit Nov 11 '10 at 17:16
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(Giving another answer because my previous one is too noisy.)

There are two big steps to do in order to compile Java source code to bytecode:

  1. The source code must be parsed into a syntax tree.
  2. The syntax tree is used to generate bytecode.

When javac compiles, it uses its own parser and bytecode generator (whose implementation details will depend on the JDK you are using).

When Eclipse's JDT compiles, it uses its own code parser and after that… I don't know. The point I want to make is that, one way or another, they "bypass" some of javac's parser. (For example, they could pass to javac modified java files that replace all casts of generic classes with raw classes).

My point is - in the end, it is a bug in the part of javac that parses java source code. (There is no reason why such a construct would not be permitted in language specification.)

In order to counteract that bug, you could: * Modify the design of your application to avoid it completely. * Every time you have to make this cast, everyone puts a raw type and an @SuppressWarnings annotation instead of the natural cast.

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