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Was there any reason why the designers of Java felt that local variables should not be given a default value? Seriously, if instance variables can be given a default value, then why can't we do the same for local variables?

And it also leads to problems as explained in this comment to a blog post...

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Sorry about that... this question didn't popup when I was typing in the question.. however, I guess there's a difference between the two questions... I want to know why the designers of Java designed it this way, whereas the question you pointed to does not ask that... –  Shivasubramanian A Jan 8 '09 at 6:20
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because initializing was not fun anymore. –  Bastardo Oct 25 '11 at 23:06
    
See also this related C# question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1542824/… –  Raedwald Mar 11 at 13:06

11 Answers 11

Local variables are declared mostly to do some calculation. So its the programmer's decision to set the value of the variable and it should not take a default value. If the programmer, by mistake, did not initialize a local variable and it take default value, then the output could be some unexpected value. So in case of local variables, the compiler will ask the programmer to initialize with some value before they access the variable to avoid the usage of undefined values.

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Notice that the final instance/member variables don't get initialized by default. Because those are final and can't be changed in the program afterwards. That's the reason that Java doesn't give any default value for them and force the programmer to initialize it.

On the other hand, non-final member variables can be changed by anyone with access to those variables. Hence the compiler doesn't let them remain uninitialised, precisely, because those can be changed later. Regarding local variables, the scope of local variables is much narrower. Compiler knows when its getting used. Hence, forcing programmer to initialize the variable makes sense.

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The answer is instance variables can be initialized in class constructor or any class method, But in case of local variables, once you defined whatever in the method that remains forever in the class.

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The actual answer to your question is because method variables are instantiated by simply adding a number to the stack pointer. To zero them would be an extra step. For class variables they are put into initialized memory on the heap.

Why not take the extra step? Take a step back--Nobody mentioned that the "warning" in this case is a Very Good Thing.

You should never initialize your variable to zero or null on the first pass (when you are first coding it). Either assign it to the actual value or don't assign it at all because if you don't then java can tell you when you really screw up. Take Electric Monk's answer as a great example. In the first case, it's actually amazingly useful that it's telling you that if the try() fails because SomeObject's constructor threw an exception, then you would end up with an NPE in the finally. If the constructor can't throw an exception, it shouldn't be in the try.

This warning is an awesome multi-path bad programmer checker that has saved me from doing stupid stuff since it checks every path and makes sure that if you used the variable in some path then you had to initialize it in every path that lead up to it. I now never explicitly initialize variables until I determine that it is the correct thing to do.

On top of that, isn't it better to explicitly say "int size=0" rather than "int size" and make the next programmer go figure out that you intend it to be zero?

On the flip side I can't come up with a single valid reason to have the compiler initialize all uninitialized variables to 0.

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Yes, and there are others where it more or less has to be initialized to null because of the way the code flows--I shouldn't have said "never" updated the answer to reflect this. –  Bill K Jan 12 '12 at 20:35

(It may seem strange to post a new answer so long after the question, but a duplicate came up.)

For me, the reason comes down to this this: The purpose of local variables is different than the purpose of instance variables. Local variables are there to be used as part of a calculation; instance variables are there to contain state. If you use a local variable without assigning it a value, that's almost certainly a logic error.

That said, I could totally get behind requiring that instance variables were always explicitly initialized; the error would occur on any constructor where the result allows an uninitialized instance variable (e.g., not initialized at declaration and not in the constructor). But that's not the decision Gosling, et. al., took in the early 90's, so here we are. (And I'm not saying they made the wrong call.)

I could not get behind defaulting local variables, though. Yes, we shouldn't rely on compilers to double-check our logic, and one doesn't, but it's still handy when the compiler catches one out. :-)

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The local variables are stored on a stack, but instance variables are stored on the heap, so there are some chances that a previous value on the stack will be read instead of a default value as happens in the heap. For that reason the jvm doesn't allow to use a local variable without initialize it.

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Flat out wrong...all Java non-primitives are stored in the heap regardless of when and how they are constructed –  gshauger Mar 25 '10 at 15:54
    
Before Java 7, instance variables are stored on the heap and local variables are found on the stack. However, any object that a local variable references will be found in the heap. As of Java 7, the "Java Hotspot Server Compiler" might perform "escape analysis" and decide to allocate some objects on the stack instead of the heap. –  mamills Apr 11 '13 at 16:57

Moreover, in the example below, an exception may have been thrown inside the SomeObject construction, in which case the 'so' variable would be null and the call to CleanUp will throw a NullPointerException

SomeObject so;
try {
  // Do some work here ...
  so = new SomeObject();
  so.DoUsefulThings();
} finally {
  so.CleanUp(); // Compiler error here
}

What I tend to do is this:

SomeObject so = null;
try {
  // Do some work here ...
  so = new SomeObject();
  so.DoUsefulThings();
} finally {
  if (so != null) {
     so.CleanUp(); // safe
  }
}
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That's just pointlessly messy. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 6 '09 at 14:13
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What would you rather do? –  Electric Monk Jan 6 '09 at 14:24
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Yup, ugly. Yup, it's what I do, too. –  Scott Biggs Mar 28 '13 at 20:38

It is more efficient not to initialize variables, and in the case of local variables it is safe to do so, because initialization can be tracked by the compiler.

In cases where you need a variable to be initialized you can always do it yourself, so it is not a problem.

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Eclipse even gives you warnings of uninitialized variables, so it becomes quite obvious anyway. Personally I think it's a good thing that this is the default behaviour, otherwise your application may use unexpected values, and instead of the compiler throwing an error it won't do anything (but perhaps give a warning) and then you'll be scratching your head as to why certain things don't quite behave the way they should.

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The "problem" you link to seems to be describing this situation:

SomeObject so;
try {
  // Do some work here ...
  so = new SomeObject();
  so.DoUsefulThings();
} finally {
  so.CleanUp(); // Compiler error here
}

The commenter's complaint is that the compiler balks at the line in the finally section, claiming that so might be uninitialized. The comment then mentions another way of writing the code, probably something like this:

// Do some work here ...
SomeObject so = new SomeObject();
try {
  so.DoUsefulThings();
} finally {
  so.CleanUp();
}

The commenter is unhappy with that solution because the compiler then says that the code "must be within a try." I guess that means some of the code may raise an exception that isn't handled anymore. I'm not sure. Neither version of my code handles any exceptions, so anything exception-related in the first version should work the same in the second.

Anyway, this second version of code is the correct way to write it. In the first version, the compiler's error message was correct. The so variable might be uninitialized. In particular, if the SomeObject constructor fails, so will not be initialized, and so it will be an error to attempt to call so.CleanUp. Always enter the try section after you have acquired the resource that the finally section finalizes.

The try-finally block after the so initialization is there only to protect the SomeObject instance, to make sure it gets cleaned up no matter what else happens. If there are other things that need to run, but they aren't related to whether the SomeObject instance was property allocated, then they should go in another try-finally block, probably one that wraps the one I've shown.

Requiring variables to be assigned manually before use does not lead to real problems. It only leads to minor hassles, but your code will be better for it. You'll have variables with more limited scope, and try-finally blocks that don't try to protect too much.

If local variables had default values, then so in the first example would have been null. That wouldn't really have solved anything. Instead of getting a compile-time error in the finally block, you'd have a NullPointerException lurking there that might hide whatever other exception could occur in the "Do some work here" section of the code. (Or do exceptions in finally sections automatically chain to the previous exception? I don't remember. Even so, you'd have an extra exception in the way of the real one.)

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why not just have an if(so!=null)... in the finally block? –  izb Jan 6 '09 at 9:42
    
that will still cause the compiler warning/error - i dont think the compiler understands that if check (but i m just doing this off memory, not tested). –  Chii Jan 6 '09 at 9:52
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I'd put just SomeObject so = null before try and put null check to finally clause. This way there will be no compiler warnings. –  Juha Syrjälä Jan 6 '09 at 11:00
    
Why complicate things? Write the try-finally block this way, and you KNOW the variable has a valid value. No null-checking required. –  Rob Kennedy Jan 6 '09 at 16:09
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Rob, your example "new SomeObject()" is simple and no exceptions should be generated there, but if the call can generate exceptions then it would be better to have it occur inside the try-block so that it can be handled. –  Sarel Botha Jan 28 '09 at 16:58

I think the primary purpose was to maintain similarity with C/C++. However the compiler detects and warns you about using uninitialized variables which will reduce the problem to a minimal point. From a performance perspective, it's a little faster to let you declare uninitialized variables since the compiler will not have to write an assignment statement, even if you overwrite the value of the variable in the next statement.

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Arguably, the compiler could determine whether you always assign to the variable before doing anything with it, and suppress an automatic default value assignment in such a case. If the compiler can't determine whether an assignment happens before access, it would generate the default assignment. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 6 '09 at 7:13
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Yes, but one might argue that it lets the programmer know if he or she has left the variable uninitialized by mistake. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 6 '09 at 7:15
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The compiler could do that in either case too. :) Personally, I would prefer that the compiler treats an uninitialised variable as an error. It means I might have made a mistake somewhere. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 6 '09 at 7:16
    
I'm not a Java guy, but I like the C# way of handling it. The difference is in that case, the compiler had to issue a warning, which might make you get a couple hundred of warnings for your correct program ;) –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 6 '09 at 7:29
    
Does it warn for the member variables too? –  Adeel Ansari Jan 6 '09 at 7:32

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