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Just want to rearrange the data in array so that similar items are not next to each. The data should not be removed from the array, if it can't be rearranged it can be put at the end of the array. But keeping the original order is necessary.

Example

   1 1 2             =>   1 2 1 
   1 1 1 2 3         =>   1 2 1 3 1
   1 1 2 1 3 3 5 1   =>   1 2 1 3 1 3 5 1
   1 1 1 1 1 1 2     =>   1 2 1 1 1 1 1
   8 2 1 3 7 2 5     =>   rearrange not needed
   8 2 2 2 7 2 5 2   =>   8 2 7 2 5 2 2      // keep the original order

EDIT: Added example to show keeping original order is needed

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3  
You want to rearrange them, but keep the order....? –  Nick Craver Nov 11 '10 at 17:19
    
I am just saying if possible –  Mark K Nov 11 '10 at 17:21
1  
@Mark - The two are mutually exclusive..either you keep the order or change it...can you clarify what you mean? –  Nick Craver Nov 11 '10 at 17:21
2  
instead of tagging any programming language you have thought of you could and should have tagged it with algorithm tag –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 11 '10 at 17:35
    
This really sounds like a homework question--you might mention that in the question if it is--it will help people answer it correctly. –  Bill K Nov 11 '10 at 17:40

8 Answers 8

  1. Sort your array
  2. Swap elements at small even indexes with their higher antipodal counterparts:

    for ( i=0; i < arr.length/2; i+=2 )
        arr.swap(i,arr.length-1-i);
    

Edit: Okay, we should redefine the antipodal counterparts. Maybe this one is better: mixing the first and third quartile (denoted x, y in illustration), and mixing the second and third quartile (denoted u, v, w). Let the counterparts ascend parallel.

        25%  50%  75%
         |    |    |
    -----[----[----[----
    11122334455667788999
     x y u v w x y u v w  <-- u, v, w, x, y indicate swap positions
    16172839495161738495
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I like this answer. It is simple, and appears to have good time complexity (not worse than a constant factor more than the sorting algorithm) –  Willi Ballenthin Nov 11 '10 at 18:06
    
I like the answer, although it concerns me about the potential run time, in that a list which is minimally different from the target condition will cause the maximal run time with this algorithm (due to the sort). I.e., a list which matches the target criteria which then has one element added to it will potentially cause a large runtime execution (i.e., this algorithm is agnostic of the degree by which the input meets the completion criteria). That said, if that's not an expected case, this algorithm looks like it works nicely. –  Paul Sonier Nov 11 '10 at 18:27
    
sorted --> 1 1 1 1 1 1 2; swap(0, 6) --> 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 –  pmg Nov 11 '10 at 18:30

Hmm. Bubblesort comes to mind, but with a three-element comparison; that is, if item[x] and item[x + 1] are the same and item[x + 2] is different, swap item[x + 1] and item[x + 2]. Repeat iterating through the list until no swaps occur. Execution order is, of course, horrible, but that should meet your needs.

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Okay, what's with the downvote? Is there some problem with this approach (other than the acknowledged run time order)? –  Paul Sonier Nov 11 '10 at 18:09
    
I didn't downvote, but this isn't even guaranteed to terminate. –  wnoise Nov 11 '10 at 23:49
1  
@wnoise: it's not even pcode, just a simple description of an algorithm; getting proper termination conditions in place is sort of assumed as an exercise for the reader. –  Paul Sonier Nov 12 '10 at 0:50

After I grasped what you're after, here's a possible solution

  1. Partition your array

    [1,1,1,8,8,8,2,3,3,4,1,1,1,2,2] -> [[3,1],[3,8],[1,2],[2,3],[1,4],[3,1],[2,2]]
    

    (read 3 times 1, 3 times 8, and so on)

  2. For each partition entry i with p[i][0] >1 (times >1):

    • Choose a "valid" position j (so p[j][1] != p[i][1] && p[j+1][1] != p[i][1])

    • Decrement p[i][0] element and insert [p[i][1],1] in partition at position j

    or leave it out if there is no such position.

This should have linear time complexity (book-keep valid positions for each number).

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Populate your array into a class var, then you can run your custom sort methods on it without changing it. Congratulations, you just created a new nosql database.

What is scaring everyone is losing the original order.

This is why the key in a hash is called 'index', think about it.

class Dingleberry
  {

   private $shiz= array();

    function __construct(array $a) { $this->shiz = $a; }

##### PUBLIC

    public function unmolested() { return $this->shiz; }

    /* @see http://www.php.net/manual/en/ref.array.php */
    public function sort($type)
        {
        switch ($type)
            {
            case 'key_reverse': return krsort($this->shiz); break;
            # Check all the php built in array sorting methods to 
                    # make sure there is not already one you want
                    # then build this out with your own
            }
        }

}

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Java: Something like this?

void resortArray(ArrayList<Integer> arr) {
  for(int i = 0; i < arr.size(); i++) //loop trough array
    if(arr.get(i) == arr.get(i + 1)) { //if the next value is the same as current one
      for(int j = i+2; j < arr.size(); j++) { //loop again trough array from start point i+2
        if(arr.get(i+1) != arr.get(j)) { //swap values when you got a value that is different
          int temp = arr.get(i+1);
          arr.set(i+1, arr.get(j));
          arr.set(j, temp);
          break;
        }  
      }
    }
  }
}
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I'm not sure this works. What if the sequence is 1 2 2 1? The first 2 swaps with the last 1, yielding 1 1 2 2. –  Willi Ballenthin Nov 11 '10 at 18:03
    
good point, sorting the array should solve this tough, but it should be possible to make an algorithm that is more efficient. –  Mark Nov 11 '10 at 18:07
    
Added && arr.get(j) != arr.get(i-1) to the if. If im right that solves the problem aswell? –  Mark Nov 11 '10 at 18:12
    
Edited again so not the i value but the i+1 value is changed. Should be better for performance. –  Mark Nov 11 '10 at 18:20

In javascript, I'd probably do:

    var arr = [ 1, 1, 1, 2, 3 ];
    var i = 0, len = arr.length;

    while (i < len - 1) {
        if (arr[i] == arr[i+1]) {
            //index is equal to it's partner.
            if (arr[i+2] && arr[i] == arr[i+2]) {
                // 3 equal values in a row, swapping won't help. Need to recheck this index in this case.
                var tmp = arr[i];
                arr.splice( i, 1 );
                arr.push( tmp );
            } else {
                // Swap the next and 2nd next index.
                var tmp = arr[i+1];
                arr[i+1] = arr[i+2];
                arr[i+2] = tmp;
                i++;
            }
        } else {
            // this index is fine, move on.
            i++;
        }
    }

This is a quick example, coding style could probably be cleaned up a lot

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Assuming A Array Containing Digits Between 0 To 9:
Similar To Bucket Sort In A Way

int B[10];//buckets
diff=0;//how many different digits appeared

for(i=0;i<A.length;i++)
{
 x=A[i];
 if(B[x]==0)
 {
  diff++;
 }
 B[x]++;
}//loaded
while(diff>=0)//now to place back to array makes an interleaving
{
 for(digit=0;digit<10;digit++)
 {
  if(B[digit]<>0)
  {
   A[B[digit]+diff]=digit;
   B[digit]--;
  }
 }
 diff--;
}
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Take the entire array and scan it for duplicates. When you encounter dupes, remember where they are. So for something like 2 1 2 2* 3 3* 3* 4 4* 2 2* 5. The ones with stars should be remembered.

Now look at the "Remembered" stuff, you have 2 2's, 2 3's and a 4

Now I'd sort those LISTS the most numerous first (2's and 3's) to the least numerous (4's)

Now just take the most numerous that doesn't duplicate the current "Front" (which would be 3 because 2 duplicates) and move it to the front, then remove it from your list.

repeat until the lists are empty. The second time through your list will start with "3" and you will have 2 2's a 3 and a 4, so you'll put one of the 2's in the front...

If you have any left (it can only be one number) put it at the end..

done, cake.

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