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Consider the following scenario. I have a table (a stupid_table) in a schema over which I have no control. It's third party, off limits. No touchy. I can query it, but not add indexes or new tables or change the design.

Every column in the stupid_table is a VARCHAR2(50 BYTE), there are lots of columns but I only need two of them: row_type and magic_number. The magic_number is populated with the string representation of an integer, but only where row_type is set to 'DATA', I only need the magic numbers that are greater than zero.

SELECT TO_NUMBER(magic_number)
FROM stupid_table
WHERE row_type = 'DATA'
AND TO_NUMBER(magic_number) > 0;

This results in an "invalid number" Oracle error, because the Cost Based Optimiser (CBO) is choosing to evaluate the TO_NUMBER before the checking the row_type and there's a whole bunch of rows with a different row_type and a different use for the magic_number field.

OK, how about if I filter the rows first, and then do the comparison?

SELECT TO_NUMBER(t.magic_number)
FROM (
    SELECT magic_number
    FROM stupid_table
    WHERE row_type = 'DATA'
) t
AND TO_NUMBER(t.magic_number) > 0;

Now the CBO seems to work out that the query is quite simple and ignores the cunning that I have employed, yielding an identical query plan to the original.

Finally, in frustration, I resort to dirty hacks: using the /*+RULE*/ query hint to force Oracle to use the old Rule Based Optimiser. This works like a dream, but it shouldn't be necessary, not to mention it's using a feature of Oracle which is no longer supported.

Is there a better way to do this?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Can you just avoid using TO_NUMBER altogether? Seems like that would improve performance anyways. Something like:

WHERE t.magic_number != '0'

If there could be negative numbers, or the numbers are floating point, you might need additional checks, but it certainly seems feasible.

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1  
Sometimes the simplest solutions are often the best. Whilst this may not be the best general solution for this kind of problem it does solve my particular problem in the most performant way. –  ninesided Nov 12 '10 at 10:46

I would solve this by writing your own conversion function that swallows the exception, i.e.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION my_to_number( p_str IN VARCHAR2 )
  RETURN number
IS 
BEGIN
  RETURN to_number( p_str );
EXCEPTION
  WHEN OTHERS THEN
    RETURN null;
END;

and then change the query

SELECT TO_NUMBER(magic_number)
FROM stupid_table
WHERE row_type = 'DATA'
AND MY_TO_NUMBER(magic_number) > 0;

Barring that, you could certainly take the query plan generated by the RBO and create a profile that forces the CBO to use that plan. That's probably a bit easier to manage than trying to provide a complete set of hints that would prevent the CBO from ever applying the MAGIC_NUMBER predicate before the ROW_TYPE predicate.

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1  
+1 for writing conversion functions, I like this idea and it does work. –  ninesided Nov 12 '10 at 10:47
    
Yes - it is a solution I really like. I am not sure how others try to solve similar situations, but for my generic use, I ended up having several 'protected' versions of operations: safe_to_number, safe_div (returning null in case of divide by zero), etc. –  JoD. Nov 16 '13 at 8:56

Make CASE do the work for you

select to_number(magic_number) 
from stupid_table
where row_type = 'DATA'
and case when row_type = 'DATA' then to_number(magic_number) else 0 end > 0

In my test case, I had trouble recreating your error so wonder if maybe there are some DATA rows that don't have numbers in them. But it could also be the way the optimizer is treating my queries.

I would think that a no_merge hint might also solve your problem but since I had trouble reproducing the issue, I can't be sure.

SELECT --+ no_merge(t)
  TO_NUMBER(t.magic_number)
FROM (
    SELECT magic_number
    FROM mike_temp_stupid_table
    WHERE row_type = 'DATA'
) t
where TO_NUMBER(t.magic_number) > 0;
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1  
I was just typing up essentially the same info. But in my testing the NO_MERGE hint does not seem to make a difference. It disables "complex view merging", but what the optimizer is doing here is "filter push-down". There appears to be no hint to disable this; NO_PUSH_PRED affects "join predicate push-down". –  Dave Costa Nov 11 '10 at 18:42
    
+1 good answer, the case statement works nicely –  ninesided Nov 12 '10 at 10:48

The exact way is to use a "ordered_predicates" hint, to change the order your Where condistions are evaluated.

Documentation: Oracle ORDERED_PREDICATES Hint

SELECT /*+ ORDERED_PREDICATES */ TO_NUMBER(magic_number)
FROM stupid_table
WHERE row_type = 'DATA'
AND TO_NUMBER(magic_number) > 0;

Now try to swap around the conditions, and you get your error again. Please also considder the other answers, because I also doubt that evoking the TO_NUMBER is your best solution.

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How about creating a materialized view of the slice of stupid_table that contains only the row_type of 'DATA'?

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I usually add a rownum to stop predicate pushing. (Hints can do this too, but they are so easy to get wrong, and with this type of problem if you get it wrong you may not notice right away.) Also you should probably add a comment so someone doesn't later try to "optimize" your code and remove what looks like unnecessary logic.

SELECT TO_NUMBER(t.magic_number)
FROM (
    --Bad data, use rownum for type safety
    SELECT magic_number, rownum
    FROM stupid_table
    WHERE row_type = 'DATA'
) t
AND TO_NUMBER(t.magic_number) > 0;
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Have you tested this? I suspect the optimizer will throw away the rownum completely since it is never referenced outside the subquery. –  Jeffrey Kemp Nov 12 '10 at 2:34
    
Yes, I've been using this method for years and it's always worked. It seems like it shouldn't, but ROWNUM is treated differently: download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e17118/… I think that's part of the reason I use it; it looks so weird it makes you stop and think about what's going on. –  Jon Heller Nov 12 '10 at 4:15
    
Adding rownum has being very useful for some hard to tune queries for me. –  user584583 Jan 21 at 16:42

The with statement lets you apply a specific order of evaluation.

WITH
has_numerics_only AS
(
    SELECT magic_number
    FROM stupid_table
    WHERE row_type = 'DATA'
)
SELECT TO_NUMBER(t.magic_number)
FROM has_numerics_only
WHERE TO_NUMBER(t.magic_number) > 0;

Also consider the possibility that there really is bad data in one or more 'DATA' rows.

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+1 but: this works in current versions of the database, but I don't think it's guaranteed that Oracle will never implement a merge path for CTEs in the future. –  Jeffrey Kemp Nov 12 '10 at 2:33

You might try:

SELECT TO_NUMBER(magic_number)
FROM stupid_table
WHERE row_type = 'DATA'
AND REGEXP_LIKE(magic_number, '^\d{1,}$');

If this still doesn't work, moving the condition into a HAVING clause might force the optimizer to evaluate it first.

SELECT TO_NUMBER(magic_number)
FROM (
SELECT magic_number
FROM stupid_table
WHERE row_type = 'DATA'
GROUP BY magic_number
HAVING REGEXP_LIKE(magic_number, '^\d{1,}$')) ilv;

Failing that, a materialized view or using a PL/SQL cursor might be the only way to go.

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