Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to know how can I control the rate of my network interface, In fact, I want to receive with a rate of 32 Kbits/s and send the received data to the network with a rate of 1 Mbits/s....do you have any ideas on how to control the interface's rate?....or do you know any tricks that could help?...

Thanks in advance..

share|improve this question
    
Network interface rates are determined by hardware. Controlling it requires a soldering iron. –  Hans Passant Nov 11 '10 at 17:28
    
NetLimiter might help? –  Bojan Komazec Nov 11 '10 at 17:34

3 Answers 3

There is a difference between data throughput rate and the baud rate of the connection. Generally, you want the baud rate to be as fast as possible (without errors of course). Some low level drivers or the OS may allow you to control this, but it is fundamentally a low-level hardware/driver issue.

For data throughput rate, throttling sending is easy, just don't call send() as fast. This requires that you track how much you are sending per time period and limiting it with sleeps.

Receiving can work the same way, but you have to consider that if someone is sending faster than the rate you are receiving, there may be issues.

share|improve this answer
    
I did a search..and the result was that I can control the throughput as you said by adjusting the socket options, like SO_SNDBUF and SO_RCVBUF, which indicates the buffer size of the receiving and sending socket...ex: if I give a SO_SNDBUF=16 kbit and a sleep of 16 ms, I can get a throughput of 1 Mbit/s...and the same logic for the receiving end will work fine...What do you think? –  fsidiosidi Nov 15 '10 at 10:13

You can do this, you must only control time and carry about not recv more and less than 32kbits (you can set this in function arguments) in second and same practice on send.

share|improve this answer

I've done this "the hard way" (dunno if there is an easier way). Specifically, I did it by controlling the rate at which I called send() and/or recv(), and how much data I indicated I was willing to send/receive in each of those calls. It takes a bit of math to do it right, but it's not impossible.

share|improve this answer
    
I did a search..and the result was that I can control the throughput as you said by adjusting the socket options, like SO_SNDBUF and SO_RCVBUF, which indicates the buffer size of the receiving and sending socket...ex: if I give a SO_SNDBUF=16 kbit and a sleep of 16 ms, I can get a throughput of 1 Mbit/s...and the same logic for the receiving end will work fine...What do you think? –  fsidiosidi Nov 15 '10 at 10:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.