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I am trying to execute command line arguments via Java. For example:

// Execute command
String command = "cmd /c start cmd.exe";
Process child = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command);

// Get output stream to write from it
OutputStream out = child.getOutputStream();

out.write("cd C:/ /r/n".getBytes());
out.flush();
out.write("dir /r/n".getBytes());
out.close();

The above opens the command line but does not execute cd or dir. Any ideas? I am running Windows XP, JRE6.

(I have revised my question to be more specific. The following answers were helpful but do not answer my question.)

share|improve this question
    
joe, if you still feel that your question hasn't been answered I think you should provide more background. My answer definitely does what you want to achieve, which is to list the files in C:\. Vincent and Carles' answers show you how to run multiple shell commands from a single exec() call. I'm not sure what you're not satisfied with at this point. – Andrzej Doyle Nov 12 '10 at 10:29
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The code you posted starts three different processes each with it's own command. To open a command prompt and then run a command try the following (never tried it myself):

try {
    // Execute command
    String command = "cmd /c start cmd.exe";
    Process child = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command);

    // Get output stream to write from it
    OutputStream out = child.getOutputStream();

    out.write("cd C:/ /r/n".getBytes());
    out.flush();
    out.write("dir /r/n".getBytes());
    out.close();
} catch (IOException e) {
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Thanks. This opens the command line, but it does not execute the cd or dir command. – joe Nov 11 '10 at 17:44
29  
Gee, I love snippets of code with the disclaimer: "Never tried it myself." >_< – b1nary.atr0phy Aug 28 '12 at 14:38
3  
This opens the command line, but it does not execute the cd or dir command, why? – Akhilesh Dubey Apr 21 '13 at 17:31
10  
why it has been approved..its falsepositive ! – Rorschach Aug 14 '13 at 7:33
2  
Answers below have the actual answer. – Mgamerz Oct 26 '14 at 17:37

I found this in forums.oracle.com

Allows the reuse of a process to execute multiple commands in Windows: http://kr.forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?messageID=9250051

You need something like

   String[] command =
    {
        "cmd",
    };
    Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command);
    new Thread(new SyncPipe(p.getErrorStream(), System.err)).start();
    new Thread(new SyncPipe(p.getInputStream(), System.out)).start();
    PrintWriter stdin = new PrintWriter(p.getOutputStream());
    stdin.println("dir c:\\ /A /Q");
    // write any other commands you want here
    stdin.close();
    int returnCode = p.waitFor();
    System.out.println("Return code = " + returnCode);

SyncPipe Class:

class SyncPipe implements Runnable
{
public SyncPipe(InputStream istrm, OutputStream ostrm) {
      istrm_ = istrm;
      ostrm_ = ostrm;
  }
  public void run() {
      try
      {
          final byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
          for (int length = 0; (length = istrm_.read(buffer)) != -1; )
          {
              ostrm_.write(buffer, 0, length);
          }
      }
      catch (Exception e)
      {
          e.printStackTrace();
      }
  }
  private final OutputStream ostrm_;
  private final InputStream istrm_;
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is actually correct answer that works! – Boris Daich Jan 17 '12 at 14:45
1  
Great that the link is invalid but codes copied here are enough. – mrmoment Jun 23 '14 at 4:17
    
Works ! This is great! thanks – GP cyborg Oct 27 '14 at 9:00
    
@tvanfosson Hi, I have one doubt! It works for 'cmd', I am unable to use this for 'powershell'. Is there any workaround that I could follow ? – GP cyborg Oct 27 '14 at 9:06

If you want to run several commands in the cmd shell then you can construct a single command like this:

  rt.exec("cmd /c start cmd.exe /K \"cd c:/ && dir\"");

This page explains more.

share|improve this answer

Every execution of exec spawns a new process with its own environment. So your second invocation is not connected to the first in any way. It will just change its own working directory and then exit (i.e. it's effectively a no-op).

If you want to compose requests, you'll need to do this within a single call to exec. Bash allows multiple commands to be specified on a single line if they're separated by semicolons; Windows CMD may allow the same, and if not there's always batch scripts.

As Piotr says, if this example is actually what you're trying to achieve, you can perform the same thing much more efficiently, effectively and platform-safely with the following:

String[] filenames = new java.io.File("C:/").list();
share|improve this answer
    
@Boris - check the question history, it's been edited in the two months since I posted this answer. – Andrzej Doyle Jan 17 '12 at 22:44

Try this link

You do not use "cd" to change the directory from which to run your commands. You need the full path of the executable you want to run.

Also, listing the contents of a directory is easier to do with the File/Directory classes

share|improve this answer
    
answer totally missed the point of the question – Boris Daich Jan 17 '12 at 14:46
    
Answer is not related to question – Mert Serimer Jan 19 at 8:51

Each of your exec calls creates a process. You second and third calls do not run in the same shell process you create in the first one. Try putting all commands in a bat script and running it in one call: rt.exec("cmd myfile.bat"); or similar

share|improve this answer
    
Answer is not relevant to code of the question - there is no "other" exec invocation – Boris Daich Jan 17 '12 at 14:44
2  
There was when I replied, but the question has been edited since. Please see revision history for this question before downvoting. – Carles Barrobés Jan 18 '12 at 11:42

This because every runtime.exec(..) returns a Process class that should be used after the execution instead that invoking other commands by the Runtime class

If you look at Process doc you will see that you can use

  • getInputStream()
  • getOutputStream()

on which you should work by sending the successive commands and retrieving the output..

share|improve this answer

Writing to the out stream from the process is the wrong direction. 'out' in that case means from the process to you. Try getting/writing to the input stream for the process and reading from the output stream to see the results.

share|improve this answer

As i also faced the same problem and because some people here commented that the solution wasn't working for them, here's the link to the post where a working solution has been found.

http://stackoverflow.com/a/24406721/3751590

Also see the "Update" in the best answer for using Cygwin terminal

share|improve this answer

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