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I'm looking an interval data type for .NET 4.0. For example the interval (a,b], all point x such that a<x<=b.

What i would like to be able to do are create intervals with the following properites:

  • Closed and open ends
  • Unbounded intervals, fully unbounded, and right/left unbounded.

With these I would like to do thing like:

  • Check if a point is in a interval.
  • Check if two intervals overlap.
  • Merge two overlapping intervals to a single interval.
  • Check if a collection of intervals covers a single interval.
  • Etc :)

Would be nice if I could work with both numerical datatype and datetimes.

I know that the logic is pretty straight forward, but I see no reason that I would be the first one to need such a thing either.

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Since DateTime is an integral type there can be no such thing like an open end. This will only work with floating point datatypes. –  codymanix Nov 11 '10 at 17:50
1  
shouldn't be too hard to write one yourself –  Ilia G Nov 11 '10 at 17:50
4  
You are not alone. I can't publish the code but I had to write a small library to process most of basic interval operations (overlaps, intersect, union, subtraction, etc.. look for any math book) and used it for complex operations. This really simplified the abstraction on a task planning software. I hope Noda Time (code.google.com/p/noda-time) fill this gap of the .net framework. –  AntonioR Nov 11 '10 at 18:02
    
Regarding codymanix comment. I think a common senario with time intervals in finansial applications is that you have a interval [a,b] and split this in to two using a break date, c. This resluts in two intervals [a,c) and [c,b]. If i would ask wish interval contains c it would the second, [c,b]. Any date larger or equal to a and less than c would be in the first interval. I think that the syntax of open/closed ends would be more understandable than crating two intervals [a,c.addmillisecond(-1)] and [c,b]. –  gSpotTornado Nov 12 '10 at 9:07
1  
Thanks for the input. Sadly the general consensus seems to be to it your self. Like the peons say "work, work". The node-time presented by AntonioR above seems really interesting, hoping for a quick release. –  gSpotTornado Nov 12 '10 at 14:51
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6 Answers

To get you started:

public class Interval<T> where T : IComparable
{
    public Nullable<T> Start { get; set; }
    public Nullable<T> End { get; set; }

    public Interval(T start, T end)
    {
        Start = start;
        End = end;
    }

    public bool InRange(T value)
    {
        return ((!Start.HasValue || value.CompareTo(Start.Value) > 0) &&
                (!End.HasValue || End.Value.CompareTo(value) > 0));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, that's only going to work with value types. Nullable<T> requires that T be a value type. In addition, your constructor doesn't give a way to set start or end to a null value. –  Jim Mischel Nov 11 '10 at 18:28
1  
Fair enough -- 'twas from the top of my head. –  Stu Nov 11 '10 at 18:32
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As others have stated, there are no integrated interval type. Depending on the needs of your project, a simple Tuple<T1, T2> or call to Enumerable.Range with a few additional lines of code might suffice. The HashSet<T> contains set operation methods, such as UnionWith, IntersectWith and more, but still stores all the items, not just the endpoints.

Many implementations can be found online. There is the basic generic Range class part of the Microsoft Research Dynamic Data Display project and another from Kevin Gadd. The AForge project contains a non-generic IntInterval/DoubleInterval implementation. Other (1, 2) SO questions might also be of interest. Andy Clymer has an interesting dynamically compiled implementation on his blog. More complete solutions can be found on CodeProject, in Jon Skeet's book and From Russia with Love. There seems to be a few (1, 2) commercial solutions as well. I've seen others before that I can't find at the moment.

Whatever you do, please watch out when using a generic interval type. It's actually hard to write a correct monolithic generic interval class because integer and floating point intervals have different mathematical properties. For example all integer intervals can be represented with closed endpoints and the pair [1,2] [3,6] can be considered as contiguous, equivalent to [1,6]. None of this is true with floating points intervals. See Wikipedia for details. A group of classes might be better, with an abstract generic base class and typed derived classes IntInterval or DoubleInterval to implement the different behaviors.

Aside from the math, there are a few more implementation difficulties with generic interval types. It's not possible to easily do arithmetic with generics in C#, and there is floating point NaN and rounding errors to take care of. See the Boost library documentation for Interval<T> for more on this. (A lot of it translates to C# and .NET.) Luckily many operations can be done with just IComparable<T>.

As I mentioned before, the choice of what is appropriate in terms of functionality and correctness all depends on the requirements of your projects.

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The following allows open ended ranges of any type that implements IComparable. An obvious extension would be to allow you to pass your own comparer (in much the same way that Hashset<T> does.

The range in this case is a<=x

It includes overlap and merge. Other functions should be reasonably easy to add.

public class Interval<T> where T : IComparable
{
    public T Start { get; private set; }
    public T End { get; private set; }

    public bool HasStart { get; private set; }
    public bool HasEnd { get; private set; }

    private Interval()
    {
    }

    public bool Overlaps(Interval<T> other)
    {
        if (this.HasStart && other.IsInRange(this.Start))
            return true;
        if (this.HasEnd && other.IsInRange(this.End))
            return true;
        return false;
    }

    public static Interval<T> Merge(Interval<T> int1, Interval<T> int2)
    {
        if (!int1.Overlaps(int2))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Interval ranges do not overlap.");
        }
        bool hasStart = false;
        bool hasEnd = false;
        T start = default(T);
        T end = default(T);

        if (int1.HasStart && int2.HasStart)
        {
            hasStart = true;
            start = (int1.Start.CompareTo(int2.Start) < 0) ? int1.Start : int2.Start;
        }
        if (int1.HasEnd && int2.HasEnd)
        {
            hasEnd = true;
            end = (int1.End.CompareTo(int2.End) > 0) ? int1.Start : int2.Start;
        }
        return CreateInternal(start, hasStart, end, hasEnd);
    }

    private static Interval<T> CreateInternal(T start, bool hasStart, T end, bool hasEnd)
    {
        var i = new Interval<T>();
        i.Start = start;
        i.End = end;
        i.HasEnd = hasEnd;
        i.HasStart = hasStart;
        return i;
    }

    public static Interval<T> Create(T start, T end)
    {
        return CreateInternal(start, true, end, true);
    }

    public static Interval<T> CreateLowerBound(T start)
    {
        return CreateInternal(start, true, default(T), false);
    }

    public static Interval<T> CreateUpperBound(T end)
    {
        return CreateInternal(default(T), false, end, true);
    }

    public bool IsInRange(T item)
    {
        if (HasStart && item.CompareTo(Start) < 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
        if (HasEnd && item.CompareTo(End) >= 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Overlaps seems to be reversed from how I'd think of it, though; smallerInterval.Overlaps(largerInterval) returns True, but largerInterval.Overlaps(smallerInterval) returns False. For example try var largerInterval = Interval<int>.Create(0, 10); var smallerInterval = Interval<int>.Create(4, 6); –  TrueWill Nov 12 '10 at 18:52
    
@TrueWill: It's tough to say. The way I imagined it, "overlaps" should mean that the intersection of the two ranges is non-empty. So if A.Overlaps(B), then B.Overlaps(A). Your interpretation of "overlaps" is what I could call "Contains". That said, this problem is somewhat more involved than I originally thought and my answer here is, at best, only a starting point. –  Jim Mischel Nov 12 '10 at 23:17
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Such a thing is trivial to implement. Note that because most primitive datatypes and also DateTime implement IComparable, you can make create a generic inval type which can work with all these types.

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Included a starting point below.

Though this would be a nice brain teaser, so gave it a try. This is far from complete and a lot more operations could be conjured up, but it's a start.

class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var boundedOpenInterval = Interval<int>.Bounded(0, Edge.Open, 10, Edge.Open);
        var boundedClosedInterval = Interval<int>.Bounded(0, Edge.Closed, 10, Edge.Closed);
        var smallerInterval = Interval<int>.Bounded(3, Edge.Closed, 7, Edge.Closed);
        var leftBoundedOpenInterval = Interval<int>.LeftBounded(10, Edge.Open);
        var leftBoundedClosedInterval = Interval<int>.LeftBounded(10, Edge.Closed);
        var rightBoundedOpenInterval = Interval<int>.RightBounded(0, Edge.Open);
        var rightBoundedClosedInterval = Interval<int>.RightBounded(0, Edge.Closed);

        Assert.That(
            boundedOpenInterval.Includes(smallerInterval)
        );
        Assert.That(
            boundedOpenInterval.Includes(5)
        );
        Assert.That(
            leftBoundedClosedInterval.Includes(100)
        );
        Assert.That(
            !leftBoundedClosedInterval.Includes(5)
        );
        Assert.That(
            rightBoundedClosedInterval.Includes(-100)
        );
        Assert.That(
            !rightBoundedClosedInterval.Includes(5)
        );
    }
}

public class Interval<T> where T : struct, IComparable<T>
{
    private T? _left;
    private T? _right;
    private int _edges;

    private Interval(T? left, Edge leftEdge, T? right, Edge rightEdge)
    {
        if (left.HasValue && right.HasValue && left.Value.CompareTo(right.Value) > 0)
            throw new ArgumentException("Left edge must be lower than right edge");

        _left = left;
        _right = right;
        _edges = (leftEdge == Edge.Closed ? 0x1 : 0) | (rightEdge == Edge.Closed ? 0x2 : 0);
    }

    public T? Left
    {
        get { return _left; }
    }

    public Edge LeftEdge
    {
        get { return _left.HasValue ? ((_edges & 0x1) != 0 ? Edge.Closed : Edge.Open) : Edge.Unbounded; }
    }

    public T? Right
    {
        get { return _right; }
    }

    public Edge RightEdge
    {
        get { return _right.HasValue ? ((_edges & 0x2) != 0 ? Edge.Closed : Edge.Open) : Edge.Unbounded; }
    }

    public bool Includes(T value)
    {
        var leftCompare = CompareLeft(value);
        var rightCompare = CompareRight(value);

        return
            (leftCompare == CompareResult.Equals || leftCompare == CompareResult.Inside) &&
            (rightCompare == CompareResult.Equals || rightCompare == CompareResult.Inside);
    }

    public bool Includes(Interval<T> interval)
    {
        var leftEdge = LeftEdge;

        if (leftEdge != Edge.Unbounded)
        {
            if (
                leftEdge == Edge.Open &&
                interval.LeftEdge == Edge.Closed &&
                interval._left.Equals(_left)
            )
                return false;

            if (interval.CompareLeft(_left.Value) == CompareResult.Inside)
                return false;
        }

        var rightEdge = RightEdge;

        if (rightEdge != Edge.Unbounded)
        {
            if (
                rightEdge == Edge.Open &&
                interval.RightEdge == Edge.Closed &&
                interval._right.Equals(_right)
            )
                return false;

            if (interval.CompareRight(_right.Value) == CompareResult.Inside)
                return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

    private CompareResult CompareLeft(T value)
    {
        var leftEdge = LeftEdge;

        if (leftEdge == Edge.Unbounded)
            return CompareResult.Equals;

        if (leftEdge == Edge.Closed && _left.Value.Equals(value))
            return CompareResult.Inside;

        return _left.Value.CompareTo(value) < 0
            ? CompareResult.Inside
            : CompareResult.Outside;
    }

    private CompareResult CompareRight(T value)
    {
        var rightEdge = RightEdge;

        if (rightEdge == Edge.Unbounded)
            return CompareResult.Equals;

        if (rightEdge == Edge.Closed && _right.Value.Equals(value))
            return CompareResult.Inside;

        return _right.Value.CompareTo(value) > 0
            ? CompareResult.Inside
            : CompareResult.Outside;
    }

    public static Interval<T> LeftBounded(T left, Edge leftEdge)
    {
        return new Interval<T>(left, leftEdge, null, Edge.Unbounded);
    }

    public static Interval<T> RightBounded(T right, Edge rightEdge)
    {
        return new Interval<T>(null, Edge.Unbounded, right, rightEdge);
    }

    public static Interval<T> Bounded(T left, Edge leftEdge, T right, Edge rightEdge)
    {
        return new Interval<T>(left, leftEdge, right, rightEdge);
    }

    public static Interval<T> Unbounded()
    {
        return new Interval<T>(null, Edge.Unbounded, null, Edge.Unbounded);
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(this, obj))
            return true;

        var other = obj as Interval<T>;

        if (other == null)
            return false;

        return
            ((!_left.HasValue && !other._left.HasValue) || _left.Equals(other._left)) &&
            ((!_right.HasValue && !other._right.HasValue) || _right.Equals(other._right)) &&
            _edges == other._edges;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return
            (_left.HasValue ? _left.GetHashCode() : 0) ^
            (_right.HasValue ? _right.GetHashCode() : 0) ^
            _edges.GetHashCode();
    }

    public static bool operator ==(Interval<T> a, Interval<T> b)
    {
        return ReferenceEquals(a, b) || a.Equals(b);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(Interval<T> a, Interval<T> b)
    {
        return !(a == b);
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        var leftEdge = LeftEdge;
        var rightEdge = RightEdge;

        var sb = new StringBuilder();

        if (leftEdge == Edge.Unbounded)
        {
            sb.Append("(-∞");
        }
        else
        {
            if (leftEdge == Edge.Open)
                sb.Append('(');
            else
                sb.Append('[');

            sb.Append(_left.Value);
        }

        sb.Append(',');

        if (rightEdge == Edge.Unbounded)
        {
            sb.Append("∞)");
        }
        else
        {
            sb.Append(_right.Value);

            if (rightEdge == Edge.Open)
                sb.Append(')');
            else
                sb.Append(']');
        }

        return sb.ToString();
    }

    private enum CompareResult
    {
        Inside,
        Outside,
        Equals
    }
}

public enum Edge
{
    Open,
    Closed,
    Unbounded
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for unit tests! –  TrueWill Nov 12 '10 at 18:38
    
Have to make sure the code works :). –  Pieter van Ginkel Nov 12 '10 at 18:44
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I'd generally use the standard .NET Framework classes.

int a = 2;
int b = 10;

// a < x <= b
var interval1 = new HashSet<int>(Enumerable.Range(a + 1, b - a));

// Dump is a LINQPad extension method.
interval1.Dump();
// 3..10

// Check if point in interval
interval1.Contains(a).Dump();
// False
interval1.Contains(b).Dump();
// True

var overlappingInterval = new HashSet<int>(Enumerable.Range(9, 3));
overlappingInterval.Dump();
// 9, 10, 11

var nonOverlappingInterval = new HashSet<int>(Enumerable.Range(11, 2));
nonOverlappingInterval.Dump();
// 11, 12

interval1.Overlaps(overlappingInterval).Dump();
// True

interval1.Overlaps(nonOverlappingInterval).Dump();
// False

interval1.UnionWith(overlappingInterval);
interval1.Dump();
// 3..11
// Alternately use LINQ's Union to avoid mutating.
// Also IntersectWith, IsSubsetOf, etc. (plus all the LINQ extensions).

EDIT: If you want to enforce that this is an interval instead of a set (and/or enforce immutability) you could wrap this in a custom class.

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1  
That solution will work for relatively small intervals using integral types. But it's not going to work for floating point types or large ranges. For example, a one-day range with DateTime contains 864 billion possible values because each tick is 100 nanoseconds. –  Jim Mischel Nov 11 '10 at 18:24
    
@Jim - you're absolutely right. But the question is if you need that feature. I tend to follow YAGNI and avoid implementing frameworks if a simple solution is sufficient. –  TrueWill Nov 11 '10 at 18:33
    
I often use floating point ranges and date ranges, and would expect that from any class that claims to provide an interval functionality. –  Jim Mischel Nov 11 '10 at 18:38
    
@Jim - in that case this solution will not work for you. I hope it may solve this problem for others who are dealing with integral ranges. Perhaps you can post your solution. –  TrueWill Nov 11 '10 at 18:44
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