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I am trying to do something like this:

var test = {
    a: 10,
    b: 20,
    c: (this.a+this.b)
};

but it doesn't work. How can I access the test.a from within test.c? Is it possible?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's not possible to reference "this" in an expression specifying an object literal. Either do it in a following line or use a constructor like this:

function myobj(a,b) {
  this.a = a;
  this.b = b;
  this.c = this.a + this.b;
}

var test = new myobj(10,20);

In response to which method is faster, creation with the object constructor is faster. Here's a simple test case comparison. Run it yourself on JSBIN.

The results show that the object creation with a constructor vs an object literal is almost twice as fast:

0.450s : testObjectLiteral

0.506s : testObjectLiteralWithFunction

0.280s : testConstructor

Here's the test code inlined as well:

// timer function
function time(scope){ 
  time.scope = time.scope || {}; 
  if(time.scope[scope]) {
    var duration = (new Date()).getTime()-time.scope[scope]; 
    time.scope[scope] = null; 
    var results = document.getElementById("results");
    results.innerHTML = results.innerHTML + '<p>'+(duration/1000).toFixed(3)+'s : '+scope+'</p>';
  } else { 
    time.scope[scope] = (new Date()).getTime();
  } 
}  

// object creation function with constructor
function myobj(a,b) {
  this.a = a;
  this.b = b;
  this.c = this.a + this.b;
}

function testConstructor(iterations) {
  var objs = new Array(iterations);
  for(i=0;i<iterations;i++) {
    objs[i] = new myobj(i,i+1);
  }
  return objs;
}

function testObjectLiteralWithFunction(iterations) {
  var objs = new Array(iterations);
  for(i=0;i<iterations;i++) {
    objs[i] = {
      a: i,
      b: i+1,
      c: function() {
        return this.a + this.b;
      }
    };
  }  
  return objs;
}


function testObjectLiteral(iterations) {
  var objs = new Array(iterations);
  for(i=0;i<iterations;i++) {
    var item = {
      a: i,
      b: i+1
    };
    item.c = item.a + item.b;
    objs[i] = item;
  }  
  return objs;
}

var ITERATIONS = 1000000;
time("testObjectLiteral");
testObjectLiteral(ITERATIONS);
time("testObjectLiteral");

time("testObjectLiteralWithFunction");
testObjectLiteralWithFunction(ITERATIONS);
time("testObjectLiteralWithFunction");

time("testConstructor");
testConstructor(ITERATIONS);
time("testConstructor");

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for OOP solution. –  zzzzBov Nov 11 '10 at 18:18
    
Thanks for your help. Another question: Is this way of declaring an object faster than the "var myObj = {a:4, b:5....};" one? –  dizzy_fingers Nov 12 '10 at 0:23
    
@dizzy_fingers see the performance test case I added to my answer –  mbrevoort Nov 12 '10 at 18:34

It's not possible within an object literal since this cannot be made to refer to an object that has not yet been created. Your best option is to assign the c property in a separate step:

var test = {
    a: 10,
    b: 20
};

test.c = test.a + test.b;
share|improve this answer

You simply can't do this when declaring an object literal, the closest you can do is:

var test = {
    a: 10,
    b: 20
};
test.c = test.a + test.b;

In your context this refers to whatever parent context you're in, not the test object...and even if it did, you can't declare members like that, for example this is also invalid:

var test = { a: 10, b: 20, test.c: test.a + test.b };

...because test, a and b aren't defined yet, since it's a single statement that hasn't completed.

share|improve this answer

Why not make c a function so that it always returns the current value of a+b?

var test = {
    a: 5,
    b: 1,
    c: function() {
        return this.a + this.b;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestion. But what about performance issues? Is adding a closure after the c: declaration an extra overhead? –  dizzy_fingers Nov 12 '10 at 0:25
    
Well I would imagine so - each time c() is called it is evaluating a+b, rather than simply retrieving the value of a variable. However, depending on your situtation, this difference may be negligible. If the addition operation you are doing involves a significant number of values, and/or you are referencing c() a significant number of times, then it may be preferable to only do this calculation once at initialisation, in which case, mbrevoort's solution below may be more useful. Ultimately it boils down to your situation and whether or not a/b will change during execution. –  Nils Luxton Nov 12 '10 at 10:29
    
-1 is this answer correct??? –  gath Nov 19 '10 at 12:21

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