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I have the following problem.

Let's take the input (wikitext)

======hello((my first program)) world======

I want to match "hello", "my first program" and " world" (notice the space).

But for the input:

======hello(my first program)) world======

I want to match "hello(my first program" and " world".

In other words, I want to match any letters, spaces and additionally any single symbols (no double or more).

This should be done with the unicode character properties like \p{L}, \p{S} or \p{Z}, as documented here.

Any ideas?

Addendum 1

The regex has just to stop before any double symbol or punctuation in unicode terms, that is, before any \p{S}{2,} or \p{P}{2,}.

I'm not trying to parse the whole wikitext with this, read my question carefully. The regex I'm looking for IS for the lexer I'm working on, and making it match such inputs will simplify my parser incredibly.

Addendum 2

The pattern must work with preg_match(). I can imagine how I'd have to split it first. Perhaps it would use some lookahead, I don't know, I've tried everything that I could imagine.

Using only preg_match() is a requirement set in stone by the current implementation of the lexer. It must be that way, because that's the natural way of how lexers work: they match sequences in the input stream.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
return preg_split('/([\pS\pP])\\1+/', $theString);

Result: http://www.ideone.com/YcbIf

(You need to get rid of the empty strings manually.)


Edit: as a preg_match regex:

'/(?:^|([\pS\pP])\\1+)((?:[^\pS\pP]|([\pS\pP])(?!\\3))*)/'

take the 2nd capture group when it is matched. Example: http://www.ideone.com/ErTVA

But you could just consume ([\pS\pP])\\1+ and discard, or if doesn't match, consume (?:[^\pS\pP]|([\pS\pP])(?!\\3))* and record, since your lexer is going to use more than 1 regex anyway?

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If you could think about "addendum 2" in the question it would be great. Using only preg_match() is a requirement set in stone by the current implementation of the lexer. It must be that way, because that's the natural way of how lexers work: they match sequences in the input stream. –  Flavius Nov 11 '10 at 19:35
    
Thank you, '/((?:[^\pS\pP]|([\pS\pP])(?!\\2))*)/mu' did it. I didn't need to match the "======" because that one is already matched by the lexer, and then it puts the lexer into the context of attempting to match the regex you jut gave me. Anyway this solved my problem. –  Flavius Nov 11 '10 at 20:45

Regular expressions are notoriously overused and ill-suited for parsing languages like this. You can get away with it for a little while, but eventually you will find something that breaks your parser, requiring tweak after tweak and a huge library of unit tests to ensure compliance.

You should seriously consider writing a proper lexer and parser instead.

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This is actually for a lexer I'm writing. The matched string will be one token. If I manage to do this in the lexer (using the regex I'm looking for now), the parser will be extremely simplified. –  Flavius Nov 11 '10 at 19:16
    
When writing lexers you usually read one character and decide what to do with it, and then read another. In the parsing stage you would decide exactly how to handle this case, but the lexer should just return tokens like (in pseudo-code) [LEVEL_6_HEADING, TEXT("hello"), LPAREN, TEXT("my first program"), RPAREN, RPAREN, LEVEL_6_HEADING] for the second example. The parser will need to make sense of those tokens. –  cdhowie Nov 11 '10 at 19:19
    
I know how a classical lexer works. The one I'm working on ain't a classical one. The "user" will be able to hook into it (so no "lexer generator" involved here). Look, I'm not looking for advices on what to do and what not, I already know my requirements and the way I'm doing it is the only best one. I'm only looking for a pattern. –  Flavius Nov 11 '10 at 19:22
    
Understood. I just see a lot of questions like this and usually the person writing the parser thinks regex is the only way to write parsers. I like to try to push them in the right direction when I can. No judgment of your approach should be implied. –  cdhowie Nov 11 '10 at 19:24

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