Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a user control wherein I would like to do something different in the case of a single click vs. double click. I'm handling mouseLeftButtonDown event as such:

 private void cueCanvas_MouseLeftButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
    {
        switch (e.ClickCount)
        {
            case 1:
                {
                    cueCanvas.Focus();
                    e.Handled = true;
                    _mouseStartPoint = Mouse.GetPosition(null);
                    break;
                }
            case 2:
                {
                    double pos = Mouse.GetPosition(cueCanvas).X;
                    TimeSpan time = ConvertFromPosition(pos);
                    AddNewEvent(time);
                    e.Handled = true;
                    break;
                }
        }
    }

The problem is that WPF doesn't really care how many times you've clicked the mouse so I get the first click event even though I'm about to get a second one (in the case of a double-click). Has anyone come up with a way to work around this? I realize I could try to get clever and set some timers such that the first click gets "canceled" in the event that the second one comes in (I realize this is what the framework would be doing anyway). If that's the only answer, does anyone know how we query the system for the appropriate click delay?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

To my knowledge, there's really no way to do this. The problem is that you're fighting reality. :-) In reality, there are 2 clicks to a double-click. You want single click to be ignored if quickly followed by a double-click.

You'll have wait a short interval to see if it's followed by a second click. You can query for that interval using the SystemInformation class from WinForms, or just call the Win32 API directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I would say it's not without precedent. Try double clicking on a file in the windows file manager and see if it also renames it every time. –  Jeff Nov 11 '10 at 20:57
    
But thanks for the SystemInformation tip. That's actually what I ended up using. I'll post the code if no one has any better ideas... –  Jeff Nov 11 '10 at 20:57
    
Oh, yeah, it's a scenario that some people need, no doubt, it has precedence. I'm just saying, it's kind of fighting the system -- you have to wait for a second or two to verify there was no double-click. You'll notice Windows Explorer waits a moment before renaming the file. Anyways, good luck. –  Judah Himango Nov 11 '10 at 22:56
    
I agree, it's not great. Thanks. –  Jeff Nov 12 '10 at 0:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.