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So I am wanting to create a login script for my page using php and MySQL. I have been searching the internet for a good tutorial on all the information about this but it seems most of them just give a script and say here you go. The Problem is that I need more information about sessions and cookies and stuff. Does anyone know of a good place to learn about this stuff?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Honestly I don't know of any place for what you want cause I learned it by myself. Because really it's easy.

The basic principle behind all that is to verify that the entered login information is correct (checking it via your BL and DA, if you know what I'm talking about) and then store some arbitrary info about the user in the $_SESSION variable like$_SESSION['name'] = 'guest' and then write a simple statement at the beginning of every page that requires login to check the contents of the $_SESSION array and if it's not set, redirect to another page an so on...
That's it! :D Hope I could answer what you were looking for! ;-]

EDIT: Here is a simple login page:

<?php
session_start();    //required if you want to use the $_SESSION array
$username = $_REQUEST['txtUsername'];   //storing the value of the "txtUsername" text box in the form sent by client after the form has been submited
$password = $_REQUEST['txtPassword'];   //same as $username

if (isset($username) && isset($password))
{
    /*
    * this section depends on the implementation of your BL and DA layers.
    * assume that my BL selects a member by it's username and returns an array
    * containing his/her info
    */
    require_once('mybl.php');   //assume that my BL tier is implemented in the "mybl.php" file
    MyBL $bl = new MyBL();
    $queryResult = $bl->selectByUsername($username);

    //authenticating user
    if ($queryResult['username'] == $username && $queryResult['password'] == $password)
    {
        //the user has been authenticated and can proceed to other pages available for members only

        /* 
        * i'm storing the user's username in the session so that I could refer to it in other pages
        * in case I want to update/modify database tables for this specific user.
        */
        $_SESSION['username'] = $username;
        //store anything else you want for the current user:
        $_SESSION['name'] = $queryResult['name'];   //for welcome prompt

        header('Location: welcome.php');    //redirecting the user
    }
    else    //in case of wrong username/password
    {
        $message = "Incorrect username/password";
    }
}
?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>LoginPage</title>
</head>

<body>
<form method="post" action="login.php">
<table style="border: 1px dashed">  
    <tr>
        <td>Username:</td>
        <td><input name="txtUsername" type="text" />
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Password:</td>
        <td><input name="txtPassword" type="password" />
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="2" align="center"><input name="btnSubmit" type="submit" value="Login" />
    </tr>
</table>
</form>
<span style="color: red;"><?php echo $message; ?> </span>
</body>
</html>

The welcome page:

<?php
session_start();
//checking to see if the user is logged in
if (!isset($_SESSION['username']))
    header('Location: login.php');  //the user is not logged in, he/she is redirected to the login page.

/*
* Basically you might want to put this code at the beginning of every page that requires
* logging in. This way a user that hasn't logged in can't see the contents of the page
* and you don't have to worry about extra checking and conditions that could raise errors
* due to empty "$_SESSION" array.
*/
?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Login successful</title>
</head>

<body>
Login successfull!<br />
Welcome <?php echo $_SESSION['name']; ?>
</body>
</html>
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This is what I want to learn. You didnt use anything to help learn it? –  shinjuo Nov 11 '10 at 19:58
    
Just some simple codes written by others. Nothing complicated really. I could post a sample code if you want –  M2X Nov 11 '10 at 19:59
    
That would be excellent and maybe a description of how you post it on each page. I know how to use MySql and stuff its just the sessions and login I am unsure of –  shinjuo Nov 11 '10 at 20:03
    
So what do you put at the top of each page to check the seesion? –  shinjuo Nov 11 '10 at 20:45
    
Sorry for the late update! The "welcome.php" page has been included as well. Just check the fields you stored in your "$_SESSION" array to see if they are empty. In case they are empty, redirect to login page. –  M2X Nov 11 '10 at 20:57

You must to understand that every time you use the session_start(); function, you are creating a new session on your server or if its already created it makes a reference, so this identify every visitor by browser, and at the same time you create this session the server sets the cookie variable on the headers with a variable called PHPSESSID this variable has a hash with the id of your session.

In PHP you have a pre-defined global variable called $_SESSION this variable can be use it to store data such a flag for your login, something like this.

$_SESSION['login'] = true;

so you can use this variable to check if the user is already logged, every time you need to show something just allowed to registered users.

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I forgot to tell you, the session_destroy(); function should be use it to log out, it ends your session. –  alejandro Nov 11 '10 at 20:18

What exactly are you looking for regarding sessions and cookies?

Make sure you use http://php.net/manual/en/index.php

But if you give more info we can help point you in a much better direction

EDIT: This looks like a pretty comprehensive tutorial with all the functionality you will need: http://www.evolt.org/node/60265

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I just want to create a login –  shinjuo Nov 11 '10 at 19:54
    
Ok, see my edit above. –  Bill Nov 11 '10 at 19:56

Here are some references that might help:

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Is sessions and stuff a good way to create a login page? –  shinjuo Nov 11 '10 at 19:55
    
Sessions are a good way to track user authentication status, yes. PHP itself will deal with setting the session-tracking cookie. You are just given what appears to be a local array where you can dump and fetch whatever you need to track. Note that this data is not sent to the client, so it is fairly safe to store information like passwords in the session array. You should never store sensitive information like that in cookies. –  cdhowie Nov 11 '10 at 19:58

My authentication PHP authentication with multiple domains and subdomains, not so secured, will be updated later.

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Learn about PDO for database manipulation. That doesn't just go for login scripts but for PHP in general. It will go a long way to help you write secure programs.

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Okay I will put that on my list of tasks –  shinjuo Nov 11 '10 at 20:04

I think the problem you're running into is that a secure login script brings into play a number of features of MySQL and PHP, which is more than a lot of the tutorials want to get into.

There's a pretty good tutorial here, but it's set up so it shows how to build the login routine both in PHP4 and PHP5, so watch the numbered headings and make sure you're using only the files applicable to your version of PHP. Be sure to check out the section on encrypting passwords. These days, you'll definitely be better off doing that. The nice thing about the tutorial is that it includes comments for each step, so you will know what they're doing and can search for more info if you need it. The other thing you can do is post back here with a portion of your script if you need explanation about a particular part.

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