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I've got a 2D array that I'd like to sort into descending order depending on the contents of the first column, however I'd like the array to retain each row and move the second column as the first moves. To put it into an example;

[2, 5]
[4, 18]
[1, 7]
[9, 3]

would be sorted into:

[9, 3]
[4, 18]
[2, 5]
[1, 7]

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I'm so confused about this. It looks like you have a 1D array of pairs of ints. That's not the same as a 2D array. – shoebox639 Nov 11 '10 at 19:59
2  
That is so a 2D array :) It's an array of arrays. A value can be referenced as arr[0][1]; – Chris Dennett Nov 11 '10 at 20:01
    
I know what the presentation of a 2D array is. However what he's asking doesn't really make sense. Does have a x by 2 array that really should be one array of just pairs? EDIT: OK after looking at some of the answers it looks like that this is just a really really bad use of 2D arrays (imo anyways). The OP would do better if he just had an array of objects that acted as pairs for the ints. – shoebox639 Nov 11 '10 at 20:05
up vote 2 down vote accepted
int[][] d2 = {
           {2,5},
           {4,18},
           {1,7},
           {9,3}
          };

java.util.Arrays.sort(d2, new java.util.Comparator<int[]>() {
    public int compare(int[] a, int[] b) {
        return b[0] - a[0];
    }
});
share|improve this answer

Try this:

    int[][] test = new int[][]{{2,5}, {4,18}, {1,7},{9,3}};
    Arrays.sort(test, new Comparator<int[]>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(int[] o1, int[] o2) {
            return o2[0] - o1[0];
        }
    });

I haven't tested this but it should work. Note you may want to reverse the subtraction to change descending.

share|improve this answer
    
woops i thought you meant second item in the array. I changed index to 0. – Amir Raminfar Nov 11 '10 at 20:03
1  
If you want to this to work for negative integers, use < and > instead of returning the difference. Otherwise, the difference can overflow the int range. – erickson Nov 11 '10 at 20:08

It's nothing but Radix Sort. Its C code is as follows:

void Rsort(int *a, int n)
{
  int i, b[MAX], m = a[0], exp = 1;
  for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
  {
    if (a[i] > m)
      m = a[i];
  }

  while (m / exp > 0)
  {
    int bucket[10] =
    {  0 };
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
      bucket[a[i] / exp % 10]++;
    for (i = 1; i < 10; i++)
      bucket[i] += bucket[i - 1];
    for (i = n - 1; i >= 0; i--)
      b[--bucket[a[i] / exp % 10]] = a[i];
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
      a[i] = b[i];
    exp *= 10;
 }
}

Here it's operating on digits of the numbers in array. It's not much harder to edit the code to get code for the above problem. Here each element of the array is considered as a digit for that ROW NUMBER.

share|improve this answer

I can't speak to java specifically but the algorithm should be translatable. The point is to move both elements (or more) of the row when swapping.

int var[ n ][ 2 ] // your int array
// [[ choose a sort method ]]
// I'm going to use a bubble sort
// for clarity, despite inefficiency
int temp[ 2 ];
bool stillSorting = true;
do
{

stillSorting = false;
for ( int x = n; x < 1; x-- )
{

if ( var[ x ][ 0 ] > var[ x-1 ][ 0 ] )
{

temp[ 0 ] = var[ x ][ 0 ]; // if it's more than 2
temp[ 1 ] = var[ x ][ 1 ]; // consider using a loop
var[ x ][ 0 ] = var[ x-1 ][ 0 ];
var[ x ][ 1 ] = var[ x-1 ][ 1 ];
var[ x-1 ][ 0 ] = temp[ 0 ];
var[ x-1 ][ 1 ] = temp[ 1 ];
stillSorting = true;
}
}
}
while( stillSorting );

share|improve this answer
    
Which programming language is this? – Anderson Green Oct 8 '13 at 17:06

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