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So I have some Xaml like this:

        <Trigger Property="ItemsControl.AlternationIndex" Value="2">
            <Setter Property="Background" Value="Red"></Setter>
        </Trigger>

How can I set the color Red, to something like 250 200 150? I tried Color 250 200 150, and 250 200 150, but doesn't work. Any ideas?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Use HTML-style colors.

    <Trigger Property="ItemsControl.AlternationIndex" Value="2">
        <Setter Property="Background" Value="#FF0000"></Setter>
    </Trigger>

Or, if you want alpha transparency:

    <Trigger Property="ItemsControl.AlternationIndex" Value="2">
        <Setter Property="Background" Value="#80FF0000"></Setter>
    </Trigger>

Or using your example color of 250,200,150:

    <Trigger Property="ItemsControl.AlternationIndex" Value="2">
        <Setter Property="Background" Value="#FAC896"></Setter>
    </Trigger>
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Thanks, do you know how can I convert colors from RGB to HTML easily in VS? I mean I think in RGB and HSV, but not HTML :O –  Joan Venge Nov 11 '10 at 20:24
    
When I say "HTML colors", is was referring to the format of the specifier, not the color space. The format is #RRGGBB or #AARRGGBB, with R, G, and B in hex, not decimal. –  David Yaw Nov 11 '10 at 20:28
    
Thanks, that's good but I don't know how to do in my head. Like when I see 255 217 220, I think of light red, and vice versa, or even in HSV, I can quickly imagine the color in my head. But doing this in HEX in my head, never did it and seems like I need a calculator for it, right? –  Joan Venge Nov 11 '10 at 20:31
    
Windows Calculator can do it for you: Use Scientific view, type in your number, and switch it from "Dec" to "Hex". –  David Yaw Nov 11 '10 at 21:29
    
Thanks, I guess I will be stuck with HEX colors. –  Joan Venge Nov 11 '10 at 22:22

Sorry, I was wrong here. The way to use this is with floating point values ranging from 0 to 1.

<Trigger Property="ItemsControl.AlternationIndex" Value="2"> 
    <Setter Property="Background" Value="sc#1.0,0.7,1.0,0.5"></Setter> 
</Trigger>

To use ARGB values we must use this, a little less straight forward

<Trigger Property="ItemsControl.AlternationIndex" Value="2"> 
    <Setter Property="Background">
        <Setter.Value>
            <SolidColorBrush>
                <SolidColorBrush.Color>
                    <Color A="255" R="250" G="200" B="150"/>
                </SolidColorBrush.Color>
            </SolidColorBrush>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter> 
</Trigger> 

Update
You could also use a custom MarkupExtension

<Trigger Property="ItemsControl.AlternationIndex" Value="2"> 
    <Setter Property="Background" Value="{markup:BrushFromArgb 255, 250, 200, 150}"/>
</Trigger>

BrushFromArgbExtension

public class BrushFromArgbExtension : MarkupExtension
{
    public BrushFromArgbExtension() { }
    public BrushFromArgbExtension(byte a, byte r, byte g, byte b)
    {
        A = a;
        R = r;
        G = g;
        B = b;
    }

    public byte A { get; set; }
    public byte R { get; set; }
    public byte G { get; set; }
    public byte B { get; set; }

    public override object ProvideValue(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
    {
        return new SolidColorBrush(Color.FromArgb(A, R, G, B));
    }
}

And a similar MarkupExtension could also be used for Color

<SolidColorBrush Color="{markup:FromArgb 255, 255, 200, 150}"/>

FromArgbExtension

public class FromArgbExtension : MarkupExtension
{
    public FromArgbExtension() { }
    public FromArgbExtension(byte a, byte r, byte g, byte b)
    {
        A = a;
        R = r;
        G = g;
        B = b;
    }

    public byte A { get; set; }
    public byte R { get; set; }
    public byte G { get; set; }
    public byte B { get; set; }

    public override object ProvideValue(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
    {
        return Color.FromArgb(A, R, G, B);
    }
}
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That's that's gold. Do you know what sc mean? Also do you know if this is any slower or faster than using HTML colors in terms of program performance? I remember a friend telling me WPF uses HTML colors because they are faster to parse. –  Joan Venge Nov 11 '10 at 20:28
1  
Good question, what does scRGB stand for? Anyone? :) I don't believe that there's any real time difference in the parsing but I can't be sure. However, unless this is a real bottleneck for you than this sounds like premature optimization :) –  Fredrik Hedblad Nov 11 '10 at 20:40
    
You're specifying the colour in scRGB colour space: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ScRGB –  Jackson Pope Nov 11 '10 at 20:45
    
Yes, I looked at that page but I couldn't find a clear "s" stands for, and "c" stands for. But maybe that wasn't the question to begin with. I probably read it wrong –  Fredrik Hedblad Nov 11 '10 at 20:53
1  
@FredrikHedblad This sir was fantastic! Provided an excellent solution to a longstanding problem. Thank you! –  jrandomuser Jul 1 at 18:54

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